Double "strip planking" Core-Cell

Discussion in 'Materials' started by SeaJay, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. SeaJay
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    SeaJay Senior Member

    I have a substantial amount of 1/2" Core-cell but have some areas that I would like to be 1" thick. Does anyone know was the procedure is for laminating one layer of Core-cell on top of another? Can this be done? My initial thought is a slightly thickened epoxy but I've spent the afternoon on the Core-cell site and elsewhere on the web and can't verify this. Any thoughts?
     
  2. Bentwood
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    Bentwood Bentwood

    I laminated 2 layers of 1/2" corecell together for the deck and cabin cores of my 32' sailboat. I had the "pin-hole" variety of corecell that allows air to get out and glue to leak into the bond. I used epoxy thickened with microballoons and colloidal silica, spread on both surfaces with a notched trowel. It is very important to get an even gluing pressure across the entire surface. Vacuum bagging works best. Other alternatives were to screw the corecell to frames with plywood strips to hold the screw heads.
     
  3. SeaJay
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    SeaJay Senior Member

    Many thanks Bentwood! You have described my exact situation and my ideas of how to deal with it. I will proceed as you have suggested.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Firstly, are you using solid sheets or scored? Secondly, you should bond the sheets with the same resin you will laminate the skins with.
     
  5. SeaJay
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    SeaJay Senior Member

    Gonzo,

    My plan was to use thickened epoxy as noted above...the same as tabbing and deck laminate. The core-cell is kerfed.
     
  6. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    please fill the kerfs. If the stuff is knife cut without scrim, press it over a curved surface, and apply resin. Turn around and do the other side as well.

    With the scrim cloth version, one side bending and filling is enough. Then bed into the core bedding compound. (can be epoxy with fillers added)
     
  7. SeaJay
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    SeaJay Senior Member

    Herman,

    Yes it is knife cut. I will do as you have suggested, thanks.
     
  8. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Actually this procedure is described in "Core-Cell Design Manual" which was publised by ATC Chemicals, but unfortunately it disappeared when Gurit took over.
     
  9. mikereed100
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    mikereed100 Junior Member

    ATC/Gurit make a product called "Corebond" formulated specifically for this purpose http://www.noahsboatbuilding.com/noahusa/itemdesc.asp?ic=cbb705&eq=&tp=
    Mike
     
  10. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    This can be done in a number of ways, and with a range of materials. Basics are that a laminating resin is applied on both sufaces, and a thickened resin for the actual glueing. Pressing things down (vacuum) helps getting a good bond.
     
  11. SeaJay
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    SeaJay Senior Member

    Mike,

    Thanks for the note about Core-Bond and the link to Noah's. I purchased the Core-Cell from Noah's and have considered using the core-bond, but I'm purchasing epoxy for all of the laminating and tabbing and thought it best to try to use an epoxy product for the lamination of the core-cell itself. Just one less variable in the mix.

    Herman,

    Do you know of an epoxy based product simialar to the Core-Bond Mike mentioned?
     
  12. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    I am not familiar with products available in the USA. In Europe the company Sicomin has some nice bonding pastes, based on epoxy.
     
  13. sigurd
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    sigurd Pompuous Pangolin

    Old ATC webpage was still running last time I checked and had some tech pdf files, possibly the one you mention, at least something on the use of the corebond.

    but i dont remember the adress any more.
     

  14. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    It was atc-chem.com, but that brings you to the Gurit website now.
     
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