DOLPHIN MASSACRE in Japan !!!

Discussion in 'Press Releases' started by brian eiland, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    Stu,

    You're absolutely right. The original inhabitants of North America, our Indians, had/have a culture that believed that man is entitled to kill other creatures for his needs, as other predators do. It was important, however, to kill quickly with as little suffering as possible, to kill for needs and not waste, and to give thanks to the spirit of the creature consumed, and thanks to the Great Spirit who watches over all.

    I still can't find any flaw in that.
     
  2. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    read the EDUCATION OF LITTLE TREE, Forrester I think, maybe have author wrong read also THE LAST OF THE BREED, L'Amour, the only decent book he wrote, IMO, brilliant
    Most Northern indians were this way, BUT some of the Plains NATIONS drove the buffelo in huge herds off cliffs to take a few? I dunno, maybe the storys are embellished with time
     
  3. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    ...."to give thanks to the spirit of the creature consumed"...well said
     
  4. sigurd
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    sigurd Pompuous Pangolin

    I heard on tv most of the big mammals in NA got extinct shortly after the indians came there.
     
  5. sigurd
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    sigurd Pompuous Pangolin

    "You really can not say that living things down the food chain do not feel pain, "

    why not? Btw I was only asking.

    edit: Is it very painful for mammals to bleed to death? A clean cut often does not hurt a lot. Takes a bit of time to die, not necesserily a bad thing? We usually don't shoot humans in the head to "end their misery", even if they are dying slowly.
     
  6. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    Read it; I agree it was an excellent book. Never read his cowboy stuff.

    That story came from an observation by the Lewis & Clark expedition, passing rotting carcasses at the base of a cliff. Never any evidence that Indians did it. Driving them off a cliff was practiced, but most often by large tribes stampeding smaller groups of buffalo. Almost all the meat and hide were taken and used. It took 20-60 hides to make a single tipi. The excess meat was dried into jerky, fed a tribe for up to 6 months. The point is that they did not slaughter wastefully, tried to take waht was needed.
     
  7. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    The big mammals in Europe and Asia became extinct around the time modern man began to spread there, around the same time. Happened all over the world at the end of the Pleistocene Era and the last Ice Age. Guess early tribes liked mastodon and mammoth steak?
     
  8. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    cept bears, bears were in EVERY state, grizzlies that is, til us ****** turned up, oh forget hawii,
     
  9. timgoz
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    timgoz Senior Member

    They have found evidence of past "barren ground" grizzlies on the Labrador Coast.

    Today, it is the only place to support barren ground Black Bears.

    Tim
     
  10. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    By ERIN CONROY, Associated Press Writer Tue Jun 12, 6:24 PM ET

    BOSTON - A 50-ton bowhead whale caught off the Alaskan coast last month had a weapon fragment embedded in its neck that showed it survived a similar hunt — more than a century ago.

    Embedded deep under its blubber was a 3 1/2-inch arrow-shaped projectile that has given researchers insight into the whale's age, estimated between 115 and 130 years old.

    "No other finding has been this precise," said John Bockstoce, an adjunct curator of the New Bedford Whaling Museum.

    Calculating a whale's age can be difficult, and is usually gauged by amino acids in the eye lenses. It's rare to find one that has lived more than a century, but experts say the oldest were close to 200 years old.

    The bomb lance fragment, lodged a bone between the whale's neck and shoulder blade, was likely manufactured in New Bedford, on the southeast coast of Massachusetts, a major whaling center at that time, Bockstoce said.

    It was probably shot at the whale from a heavy shoulder gun around 1890. The small metal cylinder was filled with explosives fitted with a time-delay fuse so it would explode seconds after it was shot into the whale. The bomb lance was meant to kill the whale immediately and prevent it from escaping.

    The device exploded and probably injured the whale, Bockstoce said.

    "It probably hurt the whale, or annoyed him, but it hit him in a non-lethal place," he said. "He couldn't have been that bothered if he lived for another 100 years."

    The whale harkens back to far different era. If 130 years old, it would have been born in 1877, the year Rutherford B. Hayes was sworn in as president, when federal Reconstruction troops withdrew from the South and when Thomas Edison unveiled his newest invention, the phonograph.

    The 49-foot male whale died when it was shot with a similar projectile last month, and the older device was found buried beneath its blubber as hunters carved it with a chain saw for harvesting.

    "It's unusual to find old things like that in whales, and I knew immediately that it was quite old by its shape," said Craig George, a wildlife biologist for the North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife Management, who was called down to the site soon after it was found.

    The revelation led George to return to a similar piece found in a whale hunted near St. Lawrence Island in 1980, which he sent to Bockstoce to compare.

    "We didn't make anything of it at the time, and no one had any idea about their lifespan, or speculated that a bowhead could be that old," George said.

    Bockstoce said he was impressed by notches carved into the head of the arrow used in the 19th century hunt, a traditional way for the Alaskan hunters to indicate ownership of the whale.

    Whaling has always been a prominent source of food for Alaskans, and is monitored by the
    International Whaling Commission. A hunting quota for the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission was recently renewed, allowing 255 whales to be harvested by 10 Alaskan villages over five years.

    After it is analyzed, the fragment will be displayed at the Inupiat Heritage Center in Barrow, Alaska.

    (This version REMOVES incorrect c
     
  11. StianM
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    StianM Senior Member

    Now who gave me bad rep because off this? Only coment they laft was "not a mature thing to say"

    Now I'm going to leave bad rep with everyone I think come with coments that are against annything I like to be true and we will all see how nice this forums will be.
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    zawwwwwwwwwwww stian I love yah!! please dont give me bad rep!!
     
  13. StianM
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    StianM Senior Member

    Sorry I'm a litle homofobic so please keep the words love out of this, but I like you too.
     
  14. timgoz
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    timgoz Senior Member

    LazeyJack,

    I've personally met John R. Bockstoce twice. Both times were on the Labrador coast. He is good friends with my friend Capt. Henry Webb of Nain.

    Because of our mutual friend I was invited to lunch on the "Belvedere", John's 60' steel motorsailor. This boat has done a West to East NW Passage crossing. His book "Arctic Passages" deals with the above.

    Henry & I even left a 3 barrel diesel stash for him at Hebron Fiord. That year John tried to get to Baffin Is. but I think got turned back by the ice. The fuel stash was for topping off on the return.

    Very interesting man.

    Tim
     

  15. charmc
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    charmc Senior Member

    Stian,

    Some irony there, as that person's "disapproving" your words anonymously was "not a mature thing to do". :mad: :mad:

    I find it difficult to understand why people snipe anonymously instead of showing the courage and simple courtesy of posting openly that they don't like what you said, because .... .

    Their loss, because if I argue with you, we both have a chance to learn, whereas they have to live with their sneaky and not courageous selves for all their lives. Too bad for them. :p :p
     
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