Dolfi 37 classic daysailer

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Dolfiman, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. Dolfiman
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 572
    Likes: 249, Points: 43
    Location: NICE (France)

    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Dolfi 37 wants to be in line with the historical Sonder Klasse and Skerry cruisers, fine elegant keelboats with a small cabin, which are still highly appreciated by amateurs of classic sailing. Dolfi 37 offers a renewed version of this program, with a more modern hull and sail plan, with the comfort of a larger cockpit and of a cabin with sanitary, for day or week-end sailing. With a length of 11,3 m for a width of 2.4 m, Dolfi 37 shows classic lines and slenderness (L/B 4,7) proper to this tradition while avoiding the highest L/B ratios (up to 8 !) which were a consequence of these class rules.

    With my thanks by advance for your comments.

    On a complementary document on progress, I will propose you a tentative evaluation of the performance and the seakeeping behaviour of the Dolfi 37 when sailing upwind on waves at 45°, based on the use of RAO's and drift forces crossed with a VPP.
     

    Attached Files:

    JosephT and Doug Lord like this.
  2. CT249
    Joined: May 2003
    Posts: 1,172
    Likes: 52, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 215
    Location: Sydney Australia

    CT249 Senior Member

    Lovely. Nice boat and nice aesthetics.
     
  3. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 715
    Likes: 60, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 218
    Location: Roaring Forties

    JosephT Senior Member

    Nice, fast looking boat Dolphiman. The wooden hull Skerry's look awesome. You're modernized approach chops off the long spoon stern and full keel, but retains much of the rest of the deck & cabin layout. I noticed the legacy Skerry designs have a tiller vs. helm. Did you consider tossing out the tiller as well? As a skipper I would rather have one in a 30+ ft boat. After all...you've modernized it everywhere else! Toss the tiller in the drink! :p
     
  4. Dolfiman
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 572
    Likes: 249, Points: 43
    Location: NICE (France)

    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Dear Joseph, Doug, CT249 , many thanks for your likes and kind comments.

    In a modern classic approach, we try to keep the essential of the classics, i.e. what seems timelessly evident and beautiful in a classic design, through a reinterpretation, not just a copy of the lines. And with the introduction of more modern solutions when relevant and compatible with this main objective.

    As regard the rear overhang, I had always a preference for inverted transom associated with stretched rear water lines, typical of the 60's - 70's designs, they are more rational and timeless in their kind and can be compatible with a skerry cruiser overall look.

    For the front overhang, I was influence by both the Sonder Kassel Tilly XV and the 12m JI KZ5 , but keeping a V at the station 0 associated with slightly pinched front water lines so to avoid bumping on waves. Beyond the aesthetic purpose, this generous overhang has also a bow sprit function to put up a gennaker or an assymetric.

    For the sheer line, again a strong influence from Tilly XV one, Résultats Google de recherche d'images correspondant à http://classicsailboats.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/tilly.jpg https://goo.gl/images/aNZjCS , with soft regular curvature leading to a quite large transom beam/maximum beam ratio although still classic by comparison with current standard.

    While a 37' boat, the displacement in charge is less than 3 t, and a tiller + stick is then, to my opinion, the more pleasant solution, leading to a more natural and confortable sitting windward, the cockpit space is not splitted in two parts, it is more easy for the helmer to go to the winches when necessary.
     
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  5. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 715
    Likes: 60, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 218
    Location: Roaring Forties

    JosephT Senior Member

    Thanks for your detailed response Dolphiman. The ergonomics to/from the winches is very important. It’s clear you have a passion for history and designing better yachts for tomorrow’s sailing. Keep up the good work!
     
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