Does 5200 adhere to concrete?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Kailani, Jun 17, 2014.

  1. Kailani
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    Kailani Senior Member

    I want to adhere a treated wood profile to poured concrete and keep any water from going underneath. (This is for an indoor "pool" in a house. The wood will normally be above the water.)

    Will 5200 work?
     
  2. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    West epoxy will (probably all the other marine epoxys)
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  4. SleepyOldDog
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    SleepyOldDog Junior Member

    I second the use of West System Epoxy. Without seeing a profile sketch of this wood piece - I think you may need to consider some other strengthening in the form of dowels (drilled into the concrete and wood) and/or fillets. For the fillets I would use West System Resin with either 404 or 406 filler.

    If the wood - treated or not - is going to get wet in normal use, I would consider "painting" the whole surface of the wood with West system (following all West System recommendations). Think of it like a plywood boat. Then paint the treated wood with a good quality marine topside paint.

    Good luck.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Wood and concrete expand at very different ratios. Epoxy is too rigid for the joint. A polyurethane adhesive is a better choice.
     
  6. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    I would usually use Sika 11FC for that, once I did a fitout to a ferrocement yacht & had to cleat out the whole interior with batten & sika to have something to attach the lining to.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5T8T_km1I-k

    Jeff
     
  7. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Epoxy has held on to my concrete for 10 years - is that enough? I guess the Texas heat would expand the concrete enough to do a realistic test?

    Experience is better than theory
     
  8. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    It's not clear to me, is it gluing something to the concrete, like a piece of wood, or is it just some epoxy that slopped off a project and is still stuck there?
     
  9. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    A wood block fixed to the concrete as a stop.
    I am not really asking, I'm telling you that practical experience says epoxy is flexible "enough".
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A wood block would be OK. Large pieces of wood move proportionally and will break the bond.
     
  11. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Well I gave you my experience, can you give us yours?
    Or is this theoretical?
     
  12. SleepyOldDog
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    SleepyOldDog Junior Member

    I really love this forum. But, I really would not challenge Gonzo's credibility... His collection of posts through the years speaks volumes for his knowledge and experience.

    The joy and challenge of boat "design" is there can be many right answers and many opinions.

    The challenge with this discussion is we do not know from the original post what the "adhere a treated wood profile to poured concrete and keep any water from going underneath" really looks like.
     
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  13. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I generally respect Gonzo's credibility.
    Occasionally I would like something other than a Yoda pronouncement, because I would like to learn something other than "trust me". That sets off alarms. Actually I ask because I expect he has good reasons. Others I don't bother to ask.

    Gonzo can defend himself, if you must view it as an attack.

    As I've said to others, I'll challenge anything I like - its part of what makes this forum valuable.
     
  14. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member


  15. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    I actually epoxy the concrete, just mask up the area, then use the 5200 adhesive, never failed yet that I know about, so continue to do it.
     
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