Do they exist? articulating paddle wheel

Discussion in 'Propulsion' started by justinDesign, Sep 24, 2007.

  1. justinDesign
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    justinDesign Junior Member

    Is there such a thing as an articulationg paddle wheel? I have tried to find some pictures or videos on the internet and have not had any luck. I wish to lern how they function and what they look like so I may decide wether or not to use on in a design of mine.

    Please help me
     
  2. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The articulation was a set of levers that allowed the paddle (mounted on a pin) to drop into the water with less splash , set the angle as the power was used , and then had the padle lift WITHOUT lifting any water, a waste of energy.

    Look at some of the Mississippi river boat sites.

    FF
     
  3. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Hmmm - Me and Google cant find any references. Any one else have better luck ?
     
  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Attached Files:

  5. RAY TOSTADO
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    RAY TOSTADO Junior Member

    Here is my conclusion, based on a 14 day old real time application of a 20" dia. 6"X14" wheel with 8 spokes. This was done on a 14' efficient dinghy hull. Grooss weight (with 2 crew) at about 600#.

    Too many spokes. What will seem like application power does nothing but create a turbulent vortex that will rob the next paddle of a firm water mass to push against.

    I did not lack for power, just application. This I believe is an accurate conclusion as how the slower I turned the wheel the more real forward push the system developed. I will, given a return of my interest level, remove 50% of the wheels and make another test.

    My full conclusion is that for a basic 14' hull the diameter of the wheel should be a minimum of 60". Such geometry provides a less turbulant footprint into the water.

    As to the water push and lift power consumption I feel, by witness, it to be minimal. But if it is of concern then the next generation wheel design should be a triangular design with a single upper driver wheel and two immersed lower idler wheels. The proper distance between the idler wheels will allow for multiple paddles to be providing force at an optimum attitude simultaneously.


    Ray Tostado
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Thats an interesting observation, but on reflection - quite expected.
    The paddlewheelers of the past had much larger wheels, and paddles, so the disturbance created by extra 'machinery' dipping in the water would have been far less intrusive.
    Also, you did not state the RPM you were operating when the disturbance was so noticable. I imagine the slower speeds you operated at were closer to the 'scaled up' operations of the bigger wheels.
    For all that, I think paddlewheels have a good place in craft even today. At one time, it was a two man paddle wheeler that held the world record for man powered propulsion.
    I would be very interested to hear and see the new designs you come up with.
    Keep up the experimenting.
     
  7. Lin Olen
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    Lin Olen Junior Member

    Numerous types, look up Kensington Museum, London, UK
     
  8. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Its hard to look up a museum without being there.
    Do you have one or two usefull links ?
     
  9. tinhorn
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    tinhorn Senior Member

    A Compendium of Paddle Wheel Knowledge, complete with Formulas and Complicated Calculations, as Recorded from the Year of Our Lord 1840 through 1918, inclusive. Also pretty pictures:
     

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  10. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

  11. tinhorn
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    tinhorn Senior Member

    Addendum

    Man, I left out one of the coolest ones:
     

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  12. Dan Listermann
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    Dan Listermann Junior Member

    Riding lawn mower powered sidewheeler.

    We recently bought a cabin on a small river. The river's depth does not allow for prop driven motors. I thought a paddle boat could better handle the shallows better. It occured to me that a riding lawn mower might have the drive train needed to propel a paddle wheel. Obviously the motor is there, but much more important is the transmission. A reverse would be needed and a change of gears would be handy too.

    The hull would be a jon boat. Hanging a paddle off the stern might be clumsey. Side wheels would provide more balance. Further a belt tightening system could allow single side power for tight manuerving.

    Paddles made from stiff rubber might be nice to head off inevitable problems.
     
  13. robherc
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    Hmm....the articulated (or feathered) paddle-wheel would seem to hold quite a lot of promise to me. The biggest advantage I see for it, however, is by not introducing as much air in the wake of each paddle, far more than simply not lifting water.

    By not mixing (as much) air into the water at the beginning of each paddle's "push" it would seem to me that a more stable waterflow would be available for the next paddle to "push against," thus allowing better efficiency at higher RPMs. ...but that's just my opinion...I haven't tested it yet, but now you guys have piqued my curiosity!
     
  14. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I still get excited by this concept at

    http://www.autocanoe.com

    A small craft with this setup could go so many places.

    Now if we could have an adjustable articulation setup that was efficient at paddling, that could be adjusted so that it "walked" on the flats of the paddlewheel over sand and mud .....

    I have a lot of thinking to do .......
     

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  15. Dan Listermann
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    Dan Listermann Junior Member

    That does look like fun!

    Feathering would be great, but that is far more time and effort than I have time to work out.
     
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