Do self bailing scuppers really work?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Flying Flivver, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. Flying Flivver
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 35
    Location: Ottawa ON canada

    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    I have a quick question.

    SELF BAILING "FLOW-MAX" SCUPPER

    Do these actually work? if so where is the optimal location for it?

    Thanks for your answers in advance.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 477, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes scuppers work. The one you're looking at is a floating ball type of scupper. Location depends on the boat type.
     
  3. Flying Flivver
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 35
    Location: Ottawa ON canada

    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    hydrostream-flivver.jpg

    as you can see the boat has no drain at all so the location is of my choice and I know from experience depending on what you are doing this type of boat can fill with water quickly depending on what you are doing.
     
  4. JEM
    Joined: Jan 2004
    Posts: 299
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: Greensboro, NC

    JEM Senior Member

    Does it have a subfloor?
     
  5. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 44
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 36
    Location: USA

    goldhunter_2 Junior Member

    what about using the "duckbill" style self drains on the transom for that hull , it would move them back out of your floor and drain when in motion
     
  6. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Ive never seen a self bailing scupper that works. A blade of sea grass or desiccated flying fish makes them leak and blow back. A plug is more reliable and dry.

    One way valves are just are troublesome, restrict water flow and are dangerous when junk builds up and plugs them
     
  7. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    I've never had a hand bailer fail, accept for the one that wasn't tied to the boat and blew overboard.
     
  8. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    That's a nice little punt. From where did it come?
     
  9. Flying Flivver
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 35
    Location: Ottawa ON canada

    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    No it does not have a subfloor.

    I just looked at the duckbill style valve they look interesting and better than the floating ball type, but it appears that it may have the same pitfalls as Michael mentioned getting clogged with debris for me it would be pine needles.

    It would not be dangerous if the boat filled with water as the hull has a good amount of positive floatation.

    I might install two expanding plug type drains, one in each corner to evacuate the water faster and perhaps try a duckbill in one.
     
  10. Flying Flivver
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 35
    Location: Ottawa ON canada

    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    I have had the bailer fly out a few times then I tied it to the gas tank

    It is a 2012 Hydrostream FLIVVER from Gordon Bay Marine in Ontario.
     
  11. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

  12. Flying Flivver
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 35
    Location: Ottawa ON canada

    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    that makes perfect sense. the less holes through the core the better they only promote rot but it only works if you have a battery and an electrical system.

    so it is now 1 centered drain plug.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 477, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's absolutely ridiculous to suggest that scuppers always leak and that you shouldn't have them. Just about every production and custom boat built, incorporates scuppers of some sort, deep sea vessels would founder without them and speaking in general terms about the evils of scuppers, just shows a serious lack of knowlage. For God's sake, you need scuppers on most boats and the lack of them can cause you to swim home.

    On plane mode dinghies, the Anderson bailer is the way to go, with literally hundreds of thousands in service, we all must be nuts, right? On power craft you have several options, but you have to decide what you want, how it will be used and what you expect from it.

    Since that boat hasn't a self bail height sole, you'd be better off with a pump, as you'll always have water in that little thing. Mounted at the transom, because she'll always be in stern down trim. Coupled with a pump, I'd also have a transom plug, though a bit of over kill for a boat easily turned over, with an engine and tank mounted, not so much.

    Lastly, most water boards a boat over the sides or as sweet water (rain) folks, not through hull fittings. A boat this size will constantly have it's bow wave and passing wakes climbing in. Just not enough freeboard, so it's thru hulls are an irreverent consideration, in spite of the manic instance to the contrary.
     

  14. Flying Flivver
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 37
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 35
    Location: Ottawa ON canada

    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    I don’t know that is why I ask. It is a simple Pursuit of greater knowledge and understanding.

    Yes there will always be some water in the boat. It is what I call a wet boat, but I want a drain of some sort and have no electrical system so a pump is out of consideration.


    I haven’t heard of the Anderson bailer before, now it sounds like the best answer.

    I want the water to leave the boat as I accelerate. I don’t like having to hold the tiller and pull the plug that’s behind the gas tank at speed.

    So from my understanding a good place for an Anderson bailer would be through the bottom of the center panel at the stern where I can pull the handle to let the water out and close it before I slow down.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.