diy kayak outfitted for fishing?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by jason41987, Jun 21, 2013.

  1. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    im moving to wisconsin soon, and most of my fishing at this point will be on lakes, no longer on the shores of rivers, and id like to get into building my own boats.. probably hardwood, but id consider fiberglass designs too..

    anyway, i dont want a large boat, like a full size speed or bass boat.. i want something that can be carried on the top of a car, or towed behind with a small car so im looking into kayaks.. and im fine with manual propulsion for fishing.. im a bit of a minimalist, so the idea of a fishing kayak really attracts me.. im also considering a fishing canoe.. and considering the idea of foldable or retractable pontoons for the aided stability when leaning over to pull a fish out of the water

    as for design, well, id like something i could mount a rod holder or two to the top or sides of, an area to put fish i catch and want to keep.. a livewell would be really cool.. to some extent a small area for bait storage (minnows) would be a plus, but not a deal breaker as i mostly fish with lures and artifical baits.. but id like tackle storage onboard.. id like to be able to easily reach the tackle storage to change bait and lures... so, id like all storage to be in front of me if possible

    im not sure if i want a closed top kayak, or the sit on top style, but id like the hull to be sealed for floation, so should it roll over, itll have a trapped pocket of air inside the hull and float

    so.. what kind of kayak would you recommend, and are there any guides to installing a livewell and tackle storage onboard?.. tackle storage doesnt need to be huge... enough to hold a dozen or two lures, some spare line, sinkers, couple containers... doesnt have to be really big.. and for livewell id probably only need enough to store a couple bass or perch.. but id like some means of holding a pike or muskie if i catch a fish that size.. but for something like that i might be willing to just strap it across the top

    so.. any suggestions or ideas?
     
  2. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    Most fishermen prefer sit-on-top kayaks. SOTs are wider, you sit higher, and there is less interference with arm motion. Windage, paddle speed/efficiency and exposure don't mater to you so you don't want a sit-in. The other big item is hands free propulsion -it's nice but costly.

    Beyond that I think you will find better advice in this magazine than this blog.

    http://www.rapidmedia.com/kayak-fishing.html
     
  3. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    You might want to check out texaskayakfisherman.com
    I have a friend who wants to move from a canoe to a kayak, because the canoe gets blown around.
    I was looking at Dave Gentry's Chuckanut 12 or 15 (more volume and stability) but thought I would lower the deck line to avoid the wind pushing the boat. I also thought about narrowing the Chuckanut 15 to 30" since I believe it would have plenty of stability.
    http://www.gentrycustomboats.com/New Homebuilder plans.html

    Actually I also thought about the Whitehall and particularly Ruth since I think that is Dave's most beautiful boat. But Ruth is bigger and probably subject to wind issues compared to a kayak.
     
  4. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    im thinking for a fishing kayak, i might go with a single, retractable pontoon on the left side (my off-side) to offer better stability when leaning over to pick up a fish.. i wonder if i put a net between the hull and the pontoon if that net would be capable of holding fish as an alternative to a livewell?

    but anyway.. what i was thinking is kind of like a closed in kayak, except for the area where i sit.. keep that open.. maybe have an area between my feet for tackle storage, and have a lid in a sealed in compartment in the front, where i can reach it and let this be my livewell... perhaps put a mesh bottom on this to allow for free flow of water into and out of the livewell so i wont need to aerate the water.. have some posts on the front and back where i can tie down netting for carrying camping gear should i use it for this purpose.. a couple rod holders on the sides and a bit forward of where i sit so they wont get bumped when rowing.. and maybe a couple set of hooks along the sides in the front section to lay down the fishing rods

    pontoon optional, but i might add one for stability
     
  5. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Few features of my old Aquaterra Prism I'd like to share....

    1)it had two additional 'unofficial' seating positions. You could sit back up just behind the seat and raise yourself up about 6" and move 6" back, or you could go on knees and paddle "Indian style".

    2)It had a half circle indent from gunnel to gunnel on deck just behind the seat about "paddle shaft" size that worked perfect for strapping down upside down on roof bars (boat carried backwards). It was intended I believe to accept paddle shaft to make boarding easier, but could have been used for outrigger shaft. Three excellent possible uses! It should have had one just before the front hatch as well, so with just two poles or paddles it could pair up and make cat-kayak.

    3)Big hatches fore and aft meant EVERYTHING (and more) could be stored inside nice and dry and boat could be treated as "one unit" and left out in muddy part of yard, hosed off and go to go, or more often just left on top of car(didn't seem to hurt handling or MPG much, and nice shade in summer!).....instead of stuff strewn all over garage.

    4)full length 1/4 Moon "keel" which helped in tracking and controlled quick rolling.



    Instead of FLOAT outriggers, consider using just paddle ends!

    All you really need is "damping", so use fishing rod holders or something and have paddle ends down in water and "flat" (for max damping). Maybe disconnect paddle and rejoin as inverted "Vee" with a 90' PVC joint, then 45' mount some right size PVC tubes with 75% cutouts towards the stern(but able to use when seated) so the big Vee 'snaps' into the cutouts.
     
  6. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    so are you saying to lock the oars in place so that the ends are in the water to provide resistance to rolling?
     
  7. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Camping gear etc that you won't need to get at, store in waterproof bags in the kayak thru hatches in the deck. That will keep the stuff secured and the weight as low as it can be, which is what you want. For flotation use inflatable flotation bags, you can buy them in various shapes for kayaks and canoes either ready made or make them yourself. For your live bait, hang a live bait container overboard, for caught fish put them in a net bag or on a stringer, again hanging overboard. Your stabilizing apparatus could also use inflatable floats. There is so little room in a kayak or canoe, the more things that will weigh little and collapse flat when not in use, like net bags and inflatable bags, the better off you will be.
     
  8. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    hmm.. interesting.. i could probably mount something on the kayak, like a hook or something to hold the stringer.. and ill probably get a set of plans online for a kayak.. theres one im looking at thats a bit wider than normal for added stability.. flatter on the bottom for shallower waters, this should be good for what i need it for.. im also considering the idea of some kind of canoe with a deck on top like a kayak.. and considering a small transom on the rear for a small outboard
     
  9. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Sounds like you might like a Gheenoe. They have a lot going for them if only the lunatics that use them would not clamp 20HP on the transom. They do that and somehow get away with it.
     
  10. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    so.. the gheenoe is a canoe hull with a transom, and a top deck all outfitted for fishing by the looks of it.. id be concerned about the overall weight of it though, and its ability to be carried on top of a vehicle.. also, for this reason im undecided of id even want a motor on it.. using oars wouldnt be too slow, but would be much quieter than an engine

    what id like is to be able to carry two of whatever i make, and not require a truck and a boat trailer to do it
     
  11. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    I am getting confused jason, are you looking for gas powered, on a trailer, or something that can be car topped and paddled. The light trailer fishing boat is something you just buy used in Wisconsin. I have not seen anything new worth the price and building does not improve the result.

    A low closed end canoe is know as a rob-roy. I have one of these in Wisc. It's nice but not great for wind and waves. The advantage of these is light weight, low maintenance, access to places the power boats can't go. The problem with light weight is not so much stability, it is leaning over the side. A pontoon would be good for this. I would go with a quick removable float on a long outrigger on the end with the ancor and take it in when you paddle. Another note about power, a small electric trolling motor will power a kayak for miles and provide stability if you mount low.
     
  12. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    if i were to build a single trailerable boat, id build it myself, i have a woodshop and enjoy such projects.. but for now, a kayak or canoe would suffice.. i could carry two on top of a car.. im retiring my pickup truck from daily driver usage and getting probably a hatchback of some sort for better fuel economy and want something i can carry on top, pull off and put in the water whenever i feel like fishing in a lake.. so what im trying to do now is determine canoe vs kayak.. and i need to determine the load capacity of each one, how much they weigh, and determine what will give me the best fishing vessel, still small enough to carry on a car, and carry by hand to the lakes

    but heres another thing.. i want something i can use for leisure as well, something thatll allow me to spend time on the water for enjoyment.. i hear kayaking is pretty good excersize and i love being on the water (more than being IN the water)
     
  13. jason41987
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    jason41987 Junior Member

    i went to guillemot-kayaks.com, and they have one called the "high capacity great auk" which seems like it would be perfect for carrying myself and a good amount of gear with it.. its rather wide, so more stable, more comfortable, and seems like it would be perfect for using on lakes.. so this is the design im leaning towards

    another idea is to use the basic hull of a double, but outfit it for myself, as the doubles seem to be designed for a higher payload.. and lastly my third idea is the idea of using a canoe, with a deck on it
     
  14. Waterwitch
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    Waterwitch Junior Member

    I don't think you live well idea will be feasible in such a small craft. Paddle boats only draw a couple three inches at their waterline, which would be the depth of your well. Free water sloshing around
    would also make the boat much more unstable.
     

  15. johneck
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    johneck Senior Member

    You may want to check out Chesapeake Light Craft http://www.clcboats.com they have a few boats that are good for fishing. I have a Wood Duck 12 that I use. Enough beam for good stability, large cockpit opening, paddles very nicely. I added a rod holder right behind the cockpit coaming and a day hatch into the stern compartment. I also have a mount for a small trolling motor and battery that fits into the aft hatch if I don't feel like paddling (and there aren't too many weeds).
    The mill creek might also be a good choice.
    These are stitch and glue, so very easy to build.
     
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