Discovery 20

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by KSONeill, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. KSONeill
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Lake Jackson, TX

    KSONeill Junior Member

    I'm thinking about a Discovery 20, but I can't find much online about setup/tear down times. Richard Woods says his similar swing-up system on the Strike trimarans is fifteen minutes from trailer to the water or back, which would be great. Is the D20 in a similar range? I'm probably going to leave the mast up, so the question is really how long to drop the amas and bolt it all up. Anyone with real world experience?

    And as long as I'm here, anyone put a bowsprit and downwind sail on a D20? Any advice or comments about that?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  3. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 15,665
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    Location: Melbourne, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Dicovery 21 numbers: LOA 21’3”; LWL 20’9”; Beam 8’6” (folded) to 15’9” (amas extended); Draft 10” to 4’; Displ. 1,400 lbs.; Sail area 279 sq. ft.; Auxiliary outboard optional; SA/D 35.7; D/L 70; L/B 1.35

    Sail Plan including asy spin:
    Discovery-21-sailplan.jpg
     
  4. KSONeill
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Lake Jackson, TX

    KSONeill Junior Member

    Thanks for the reply; I'm aware of the 21. I'm trying to avoid building something here :) There's a 20 for sale in my price range, but the boat club I sail out of only has room for a folded boat on the trailer. So I'm interested in how long it takes to unfold the 20, install the bolts, and go sailing. There are, I think, eight bolts total, four on each beam, plus the pivot bolt. The beams and amas fold up like the Strike, but the Strike beams land in a U-shaped channel. The D20 beams seem to sort of land flush, and have to be bolted in.

    So I'm hoping I can chat with someone who has owned one and can tell me if it's twenty minutes or two hours. The Cyclone 23 is more in the latter camp, I understand, and that's kind of a deal-breaker for me. The Strike is more in the former camp, but an 18 feels a bit small to me and I'm not a huge fan of the stealth-fighter wing shape.

    But maybe a former or current D20 owner will wander by?
     
  5. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Why don't you write or call Chris and ask him?
     
  6. KSONeill
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Lake Jackson, TX

    KSONeill Junior Member

    I've emailed him, but I'd like to hear from owners in the wild too.
     
  7. patzefran
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: france

    patzefran patzefran

    As a Strike 20 builder/owner, I can tell you it is definetly 2 hours, not twenty minutes !
     
  8. KSONeill
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Lake Jackson, TX

    KSONeill Junior Member

    Hi, thanks for the reply. How long does it take you, from pulling up to sailing off, do you think? I've never even been around a boat that folded with the amas over the main hull, so I'm trying to get a feeling for what the time sinks are here.
     
  9. patzefran
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: france

    patzefran patzefran

    In my case, the boat stays on a mooring and I use to launch / retire the boat twice a year. My outriggers are heavy (Nacra 5.8, around 60 kg) and I use to pull them up or down simultaneaously, unless the boat flip on the side ! as she is beamy (5.10 m !), the outriggers stand very high on the trailer when up. I use a center pod above the cockpit together with two sheets with 1/7 ratio to pull up or down the outriggers.
    The complete process from the trailer to sea takes at least half a day with two people. As for sailing it takes 20 minutes at the mooring to hoist the sail and leave.
     
  10. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    bigger boats always take longer to assemble and rig. In part because of the weights involved, in part because the extra size means further to walk around a bigger boat. Usually it is the mast raising that takes the time. It is just possible to push the mast up on a Strike 18 by one man power alone (I can do it at any rate). But a longer mast will need some sort of pole/lever to help raise it. So for speed of assembly I suggest a 16-18ft trimaran. The times I give on my website are times I took when I was hurrying and had no children to look after, no spinnaker to rig etc

    Farriers are not quick either. I have helped several owners assemble/disassemble their boats. allow 45 minutes even if you do it every weekend. I also see most F boat owners keep their boats at full width rather than fold them even in small marinas.

    Few beach cats are disassembled for transport. Most owners trail at their full beam, even in Cornwall.

    My brother has been sailing Lasers for 30 years. it takes him at least 20 minutes to rig it (I cannot see why its that long but that is what he says)

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  11. KSONeill
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Lake Jackson, TX

    KSONeill Junior Member

    Thanks, Richard. I missed your reply.

    We bought the boat, so I guess I'll see how well trailer sailing it works out. It's a nice boat, very pretty shape and in nice shape. Can't wait to get her sailing!
     
  12. jamez
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    jamez Senior Member

    KSONeil, can you please post some pics of your D20?
     
  13. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Neill,

    Too bad you are on the wrong side of Texas, I'd really like to see the boat in person.
    Please post pictures, when you can.

    And a sailing report.

    Thanks,
    Marc
     

  14. KSONeill
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 29
    Likes: 3, Points: 3, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: Lake Jackson, TX

    KSONeill Junior Member

    Hi

    Not too many pictures yet, but here you go:

    Discovery 20 https://imgur.com/a/vc0jekz

    That's the pictures from the ad, and a couple of our first work day last Saturday.

    We left Texas Thursday night, drove all day Friday, saw the boat Saturday morning, bought it by noon, drove to a hardware store and installed new lights on the trailer, then to a Walmart and put on a set of cheap Walmart wheels and tires (the tires looked great until you looked at the dates... 14 years old!), drove Saturday and most of Sunday, got back early afternoon Sunday. Right at 2400 miles round trip.

    The boat looks great. The list of things to do is not zero, but it's not extensive. It had anti-fouling on since it had been kept in the water; we're going to dry-sail it, so that got scraped off last Saturday, and we'll put a coat of paint on the bottom at least. There's a short list of fiberglass patching and stuff to do, especially on the inner ends of the front beams. The whole thing could use a paint job, though that may wait a season. I think we'd like a kick-up rudder housing. I think we'd like a downwind sail. Better foils and a carbon mast may be off in the distance somewhere, but we should probably just sail the boat some first, I think :)

    But the construction itself is great, solid and tight and light. The insides of all the hulls are dry and dusty, the seams and fillets are tidy and nicely done, the beams look good, it's all fair, it's a really nice job. The guy who built it showed us pictures of the 30-odd foot Herreshoff he built years ago, and a 40' cat-ketch he built, there was a nice B&B Lapwing in his back yard... he's in his 80s, been building boats for decades, he knows what he's doing. It's a nice job.

    So, it's in my driveway now, we're going to fiddle about with it, do some small repairs, make some improvements aimed at making drysailing practical, etc. I can move it to the boat club in Galveston in January, so I foresee some cold weather sailing in my future.

    I'll try to keep the thread up to date as we do stuff and go sailing. And Upchurchmr, if you ever get to the coast give me a yell and I'll take you for a ride.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2018
    Doug Lord and jamez like this.
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