Direction on where to find a Layup schedule for a 22' speedboat?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by dregsz, Aug 22, 2008.

  1. dregsz
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    Location: Gig Harbor,WA.

    dregsz Junior Member

    Hi All,
    My friend inherited molds in good condition for a 22' speedboat, 1980s Design and we are kicking around the idea of pulling a boat from them as a winter project. I've worked w car body part molds before but never something on this scale.
    Where would I find a good fiberglass or epoxy layup schedule for a solid, (but not too heavy) hull and deck for 60+ MPH boat?

    Thanks
    Evan
     
  2. fcfc
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: france,europe

    fcfc Senior Member

    There is no response to your quest.

    I fear, if you want something strong enougth, but not too heavy, you will have to ask a custom plan to a naval architect, imposing him your hull form.

    A layup schedule on itself does not exist. You will need a layup schedule + stiffening system (stringers and bulkheads). A dense stiffening system will go with a light layup. A simpler stiffening system will need a heavier layup.

    This will be very near the price of a custom designed plan.
     
  3. xsboats
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    Location: St. Augustine, Fl.,U.S.A.

    xsboats xsboats

    Look at some comparable hulls out there. Following the fleet may not put you ahead but might keep you in the race.
     
  4. dregsz
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    Location: Gig Harbor,WA.

    dregsz Junior Member

    There must be a book out there that suggests a starting point layup to work from for a 22' speed boat?....
     
  5. nevilleh
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: scotland

    nevilleh Junior Member

    I have seen layup schedule charts relating to Lloyds specifications for scantlings. I presume that ABS will have such aswell.

    For your information the boat that we build which is slightly larger and quite robust is as follows :
    Gelcoat
    1 x 300 gms / sq m (1 OZ) CSM
    3 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) CSM
    1 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) CSM
    1 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) Woven roving
    1 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) CSM

    The above is for the hull only with additional reinforcement for the transom. Keel areas and corners are overlapped. Standard polyester resin.

    There are PU frames at 80 cm centres (transverse) and similar along the base longitudinal.

    This is for use on a 7 metre (23 feet) to 8.5 metre (29 feet) fast fisher. For a 22 feet speed boat you could easily take one of the layers of csm out. You could substitute another for a woven roving to make it simpler and lighter also.

    Consideration does need to be given to frames / bulkhead spacing although as the vessel gets smaller there will obviously not be so much un supported area.

    We also make a 17 foot fast fisher. It has an average layup of 9 oz on the hull again doubled on the keel. We use no woven roving on this as the sides are slightly stepped witha simulated clinker effect.

    If I find the lloyds chart for scantlings I will post it. Do remember that these are just a rule of thumb. And pretty agricultural at that. If you want a properly thought out design I would approach a designer. They type of boat, the spec of materials etc all have large parameters and this will normally all be addressed at the design stage.

    Good luck. Neville. Scotland
     
  6. tinhorn
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: Massachusetts South Shore.

    tinhorn Senior Member

    Not that you asked, but I strongly suggest bonding the reinforcements into place while the hull is still in the mold. (I have no idea what the standard boatbuilding process is. I learned this in the kit car biz.)
     
  7. nevilleh
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: scotland

    nevilleh Junior Member

    We use a contact adhesive to bond the foam in, or if it is PU foam panels we lay them on wet mat ensuring they are already pretty wet with resin so the bond is good with no air bubbles / voids.

    A sensible layup on a 22 feet speedboat we would go for a similar layup :

    Gelcoat
    1 x 300 (1 oz)
    2 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) CSM
    1 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) Woven roving
    1 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) CSM
    1 x 600 gms / sq m (2 OZ) Woven roving
    1 x 450 gms / sq m (1.5 OZ) CSM

    Above the waterline I would advise a core in lieu of the first layer of woven roving.

    We dont use any cores below the waterline, or above except for decks & wheelhouse. But then we build workboats.

    As has already been pointed out stiffeners should be bonded in the mould or the new moulding will not retain its shape when lifted out.

    Good luck !
     
  8. Alik
    Joined: Jul 2003
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    Location: Thailand

    Alik Senior Member

    Thicknes and lamination schedule depend on bottom panel size and position of stiffeners. There is no universal solution, have to see what is structural arrangement of the boat.

    Otherwise all recommenadtions on lamination schedule is nonsence.
     

  9. nevilleh
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: scotland

    nevilleh Junior Member

    Alik is correct, if you post a picture of your boat we can probably direct you for stiffening design.

    I have mentioned already our 80 cms centres transverse beams which should not be used as this is from an entirely different boat.

    The stiffening design is as critical as the layup schedule .

    However if the vessel is quite straight forward I see no reason that advise cannot be given here .
     
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