Dinghy tragedy caused by stability fault

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by zerogara, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. zerogara
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    zerogara build it and sail it

    Original story at

    Could this mean the end of racing dinghies in Europe as we know them?
    I have no idea what 4 person dinghy this was, but let's say grandfather and kid buys a fast 2 person skiff and drown themselves. Does that "fast skiff" need to be conforming to stability tests? Most dinghies I like can barely stand upright in 10knots without anyone on them.

    Enjoy the story!

    Dinghy tragedy caused by stability fault - report

    Mar 15 2006

    icWales


    A DINGHY that capsized causing the death of its owner and his eight-year-old grandson did not meet stability and buoyancy requirements, an accident report said today.

    The crew of the sailing dinghy Mollyanna were not aware deteriorating weather conditions had been forecast on the day of the incident, the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) report said.

    William Tinsley, 64, and his eight-year-old grandson Ben died while Ben�s brother Shaun, 11, and the boys� father Jason were saved after the capsize in force five to six winds off Puffin Island, North Wales, on the afternoon of July 2, 2005.

    The MAIB said problems with the boat were not identified during stability and buoyancy tests in 2001. The report added the crew were inexperienced dinghy sailors and that the clothing they wore would have afforded little protection.

    The MAIB also said that Mr Tinsley, from Buckley, near Mold, in North Wales, did not have his lifejacket securely fastened.

    In addition, the boat manufacturer had failed to provide an owner�s manual and departures from the Recreational Craft Directive regulations were not recognised by the importer of the boat or the dealer who sold the boat.

    :p
     
  2. JonH
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    JonH Junior Member

    I would have thought it more likely that it means the end of liability insurance for the vendor without cast iron evidence that the RCD has been complied with:

    Perfectly possible for small craft to meet RCD requirements.
     
  3. mholguin
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    mholguin Junior Member

    Don't see the point in the smiley in this case.
     
  4. Tim B
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    Tim B Senior Member

    Has anyone actually read the RCD for classes C and D (small boats in sheltered waters)? It's not a hard criteria to meet.

    However, I'd like to pull out a few points before people go on about the designers not making the boat stable enough...

    1. "did not have his lifejacket securely fastened."

    2. "in force five to six winds off Puffin Island"

    3. "inexperienced dinghy sailors and that the clothing they wore would have afforded little protection"

    My apologies if I'm being cold and insensitive, but I know exactly how danerous dinghies can be. I am in no way supporting the designer, or importer, but I feel that some responsibility must be taken by the sailors themselves.

    I would say from this map that puffin island was fairly exposed, and it's certainly something I'd have thought carefully about, and I have a lot of hours under my belt. The report says that they were in-experienced, and whilst it is only about half a mile out to the island, it's not, by the looks of it an easy trip all the way.
    http://www.multimap.com/map/browse....m=0&scale=500000&multimap.x=365&multimap.y=95

    Now back to point 1. Sailing with a lifejacket/boyancy aid that is properly done up is about the first thing we learn. I know yachties can be a bit lax about lifejackets especially as the boat gets bigger. There are a lot of people the lifejacket has saved. Thankfully I've never needed it. There is no excuse for not using a lifejacket or a bouyancy aid. Even in mill-pond conditions.

    Point 2. Force 5 to 6 winds don't do nice things to dinghies. It needs good crews to keep them flat and balanced and that's on the assumtion that it isn't dismasted. With a bit of fore-thought, you shouldn't get caught out.

    Point 3. Not wearing adequate clothing is a common mistake. T-Shirts and shorts are quite adequate on a hot summer's day, but in all other conditions a wetsuit is a necessity. Often drysuits are preferable in winter. Inadequate clothing is uncomfortable and dangerous, we've all seen it, even in the middle of summer in good conditions.

    Tim Brocklehurst.
     
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  5. solrac
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    solrac 100% sudaca

    sorry for posting a dumb question,
    in my country, every time you intend to go out from port on any kind of floating device, you MUST fill a form at the port authority, stating all data, ship name & reg number, the ship´s aproval (inspected by authority not more than 2 years back) & the sailing license of the sailor on charge, no way they authorize you to exit the port without that, and of course, the inspections include bouyancy aid & lifejackets.
    thought it was an universal rule.
     
  6. Oliver Moore
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    Oliver Moore Junior Member

    God no. In the US you don't need anything. I once got yelled at by the harbour master for floating around the harbour on two barrels I had lashed together but there was nothing he he could really do to me.
     
  7. Andy P
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    Andy P Junior Member

    The UK ( presumably EC ) RCD regulations specifically exclude stability etc for craft made for racing.
    Which is good news for the more interesting types of racing dinghies like the int moth!

    but RS and laser ( and other ) boats do comply and have the stickers/info plates regarding weight carrying etc, since they may not always be racing.
     
  8. Tim B
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    Tim B Senior Member

    Whilst RCD does not specifically make exception for racing yachts (as I understand it), many of the class rules specify what they expect for stability. It is a difficult subject though, as often the crew weigh more than the boat does.

    In the UK, like the US there is very little regulation over who can sail small craft where and when. It is generally expected that you exercise common sense and take advice from local people.

    Tim B.
     
  9. JonH
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    JonH Junior Member

    Tim B, I couldn't agree more. Conwy Bay isn't a place for a beginner. I have enough time in small dinghies to feel comfortable in sheltered water, but felt way out of my depth there. It's busy, it's cold, and the waves can get up in no time.

    If the restrictions solrac outlines were in force here, my cousin would never have got his free ride in a Sea King (inflatable, Whitby Harbour - well, briefly in the harbour...) Dozy :?: :?: :?: :rolleyes:
     
  10. Andy P
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    Andy P Junior Member

    RCD can be found here
    http://www.icomia.com/technical-info/docs/Directive 2003-44-EC.pdf

    but the relevant bit :

    Products Excluded from the scope of the Recreational Craft Directive.

    Products are often referred to as being ‘EXEMPT’ from the RCD, however the RCD doesn’t detail any Exemptions but only the following ‘EXCLUSIONS’.
    The following are not products for the purposes of these Regulations -
    The following lists the products which are outside the scope of the directive.

    craft intended solely for racing, including rowing racing boats and training rowing boats, labelled as such by the manufacturer.
    canoes and kayaks, gondolas and pedalos.
    sailing surfboards.
    surfboards, including powered surfboards.
    original historical craft and individual replicas thereof designed before 1950, built predominantly with the original materials and labelled as such by the manufacturer.
    experimental craft, provided that they are not subsequently placed on the Community market.
    craft built for own use, provided that they are not subsequently placed on the Community market during a period of five years.
     
  11. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Everyone should read the back ground.

    This accident occured in July of 2005. They were offshore when a weather front moved in and caused a capsize which was righted. The loss occured after a second capsize which swamped the boat. They were in the water for 3 hours, they all were wearing lifejackets, and the boat did not sink. The 14 foot, Polish built, boat was just determined by the British Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) not to meet EU stability requirements and is no longer produced.

    Edit: MIAB synopsis http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources/Mollyanna_Synopsis.pdf

    But still...2 adults and 2 children in a 14 foot sailboat boat 3 miles offshore.
     
  12. water addict
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    water addict Naval Architect

    meet stability requirements in a dinghy?
    all Moths are now illegal?
     
  13. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    No, Moths are not illegal, as they are racing dinghies. What is illegal (In Europe) is to sail a Moth (Or any other racing boat not properly CE marked) for other uses than racing.

    In the report from the MAIB there are several interesting notes:

    - "A Statement of Conformity with the essential requirements of the RCD was issued by a notified body on the basis of the results of the calculations made in 2001, despite no evidence of calculation being produced in respect of the required flotations tests"

    - "Problems with the boat, such as its difficulty to right following capsize and water ingress into the flotation spaces between the dinghy's deck and outer hull when swamped, where not identified during the stability and buoyancy tests conducted on the boat in 2001"

    The MAIB report states that the manufactured and supplier (With their names) were advised by the authorities about the faults in the boat. Also the owner is blamed for not acting in a seamanship like manner.... But the Notified Body, which seems to have a clear responsibility in all this is not mentioned at all. Mmmmm.....:confused:

    More:
    I'm also confused by the mention to 'calculations' and 'bouyancy tests' at the same time. If you run physical Stability, Buoyancy and Freeboard Tests as required by ISO 12217-3, then you do not need at all to perform stability and load calculations to verify the compliance with the rules. You only do this when the boat is so big it's not practical or easy to swamp it. You then perform an 'standard' stability test to find displacement and KG position, and afterwards calculate the compliance with requirements.

    The flotation spaces are suposed to never get flood (!). If they do not perform a physical swamping test, surveyors are supposed to test the integrity of the flotation spaces by means of other regulated tests within the ISO standards.
     
  14. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    C or D design class?
    I understand they are D class, so only able to sail in protected waters with winds not stronger than force 4 and waves not higher than 0.5 m
     

  15. gggGuest
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    gggGuest ...

    Its illegal to *sell* it for uses other than racing. But once you have bought your pure racing craft, advertised and sold as such, you can use it for other things if you so wish - at least in this country.
     
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