Dinghy for people with disabilities

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by taniwha, Sep 17, 2014.

  1. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: Pattaya, Thailand

    taniwha Senior Member

    We all know the 3 paralympics classe sailing dinghies: 2.4, Skud 18 Sonar. You also have the boats from Hansa but are there any other designs. Eventually even concepts? I would like to start a sailing centre for people with disabilities in Thailand and build our own boats. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Nick_Sinev
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    Nick_Sinev Junior Member

  3. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    actually a small cat with a large open deck, with perhaps a lot of grab handles or a low rail around the perimeter might be a good choice. it is much more stable than a dingy, consider the hazard to a disabled person if you capsize it. a 16'x 10' cat is a lot less likely to capsize. You could even mounts seats, or even a wheel chair mounts on a firm deck.

    small cats can also be designed to be dismantled for off season storage. I have always like lashing the beams to the hulls, makes them look more "traditional", and it requires no tools to assemble/disassemble.
     
  4. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    You need a summary of requirements (SOR).

    To create that, you need to ask the following questions:

    1.) What are the local conditions the boats will be sailed in? Protected waters, such as a small lake, bay, or lagoon? More open waters, such as a large bay, lake, or ocean front?

    2.) What are your port facilities? Dock or pier? Just a beach? Very important.

    3.) Do you want the boats to be self righting? Self rescuing (meaning designed so the crew can right the boat, bail it out, and get back underway without outside help)? Or do you want them to be extremely unlikely to capsize in the first place?

    4.) How many crew?
     
  5. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member



    http://www.accessdinghy.org/equipment/index.htm
     
  6. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member



    http://www.accessdinghy.org/equipment/index.htm
     
  7. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Crossbow fl

    ===============
    This is a concept that has been exhaustively tested with RC models and that I believe could be a tremendous boat for people with some disabilities or physical limitations. It is designed to be a fast, safe self-righting planing monohull singlehander. The wing is sealed and allows ballast to slide inside as the wing itself slides. The buoyancy of the wing is greater than the lead ballast inside and allows the wing to be used to right the boat. The thread is in the "Sailboats" forum on boatdesign.net here:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/sailboats/crossbow-fl-43615.html

    Crossbow Specifications: (changes are to be expected)
    --
    Hull length-15.6'
    Beam- 4.75'
    ---at waterline-3.75'
    Sail Area-(boat will use a carbon A Class wing mast from Matt McDonald/ Falcon Marine LLC, laid up specifically for this boat).
    --upwind- 161 sq.ft.
    -- downwind- 290 sq.ft.
    Weight-sailing weight w/o crew- 223lb which includes:
    --hull, rig, foils-124lb
    --Trapeze Power Ballast System:
    ---wing-21lb. @ 12'-16' length overall, pivots for transport, and moving weight aft.
    --- max ballast 78lb(8 pieces of lead-removable-.25" X 8" X 12"-about 9.72lb each)
    Max Crew weight: 250lb-boat is designed as a singlehander.
    All up sailing weight including crew-473lb
    DSS Foils: each 1.63 sq.ft.( 6" X 39") 6.5/1 aspect ratio, Welbourn section.
    Electrical System for moving ballast: Engineering help from Rick Willoughby



    Pictures,L to R, 1-Crossbow sailplan, 2-Crossbow model, 3 & 5 Trapwing 18', 4 & 6-Melges 24RC with Trapeze Power Ballast System--
    click-
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Try contacting Alik he is a forum member. He has recently designed a vessel for disabled people and did a lot of research into what is required, and he's based in Thailand too.
     
  9. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    taniwha Senior Member

    Thanks we know each other very well, unfortunately the boats he designed for disabled people were not sailing boats.
     
  10. taniwha
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    taniwha Senior Member

    1) Gulf of Thailand with mostly a lack of wind.
    2) Beach
    3) Extremely unlikely to capsize and if so self righting.
    4) 2 to 3 with various disability
     
  11. taniwha
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    taniwha Senior Member


    Looks stunning but also looks a bit out of budget for a starting non-profit organization in a poor country.
     
  12. taniwha
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    Location: Pattaya, Thailand

    taniwha Senior Member

  13. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: Pattaya, Thailand

    taniwha Senior Member

    Was more thinking of a boat not a kayak.
     
  14. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    The first disabled sailing boat was probably the Challenger trimaran, still available

    http://www.challenger-sailing.org.uk/

    The main problem has always been getting into the boat from a wheel chair. And of course assembling and rigging the boat in the first place

    It maybe my Strike 16 trimaran would be a better choice as the outrigger could be folded up when alongside the dock to allow for easy boarding.

    http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/designs/27-trimarans-under-25/169-strike-16

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     

  15. taniwha
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: Pattaya, Thailand

    taniwha Senior Member

    Yes indeed the Strike 16 looks very interesting and hopefully within budget.
     
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