difficult .... list question ??

Discussion in 'Stability' started by abdelrhman shah, Dec 19, 2014.

  1. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I'm sorry but this is very straight forward. But only once you have completed and understood your lectures on the inclining experiment and basic flotation and trim and Stability.

    If you have not completed these courses/lecture, you shall find this difficult and shall be constantly asking more questions, owing to the lack of comprehension of the subject matter and its terminology.

    Thus get a book out and read up on basic floatation and trim..and then Stability along with the inclining experiment.

    It is a 2 line calculation....happy reading :)
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm sure the instructors are doing their jobs, but with tablet/i-Pad in hand, they (students) can seem to get a head up on the "problem" with a quick search. Most only ask a question and when pressed for details and context, they disappear. Some hang out offering vague details, then bail out, when they realize they're in over their head.
     
  3. Grey Ghost
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    Grey Ghost Senior Member

    A really good professor shouldn't have any students who get to the final and are in completely over their head. Most of my professors did a good job. In my six years I had two courses that were a waste of tuition. One was obvious the prof was working a full time job and teaching on the side. He read his lecture poorly, there was no question period, no office hours, office door closed, and half the time those of us students who had other classes in common would be talking about what the assignment from the last class was supposed to be.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I too had good professors, but in some parts of the world, less than desirable attention is given and social expectations are quite different then here.
     
  5. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I suspect that "these students" of today are so used to instant access of well, just about everything, via their mobile phones, that they assume, well, why not my homework?

    And, just like on their mobile phones, when they get bored or can't find what they seek, they swipe across to the next app or webpage and move on; with the attention span of a gnat. Hence, the bailing out, no replies or because they don't even understand the question themselves.

    It seems students from countries that are lesser developed have suddenly equated: technology = knowledge.

    Knowledge comes from reading, learning and understanding - not a webpage. The technology is merely the tool, just like a good old book, it's just a different media. If one cannot be bother to either pick up and read a book or attempt to understand that which they initially do not know by finding out for themselves, no technology is going to make them educated. Technology simply exposes their lack of engagement and unwillingness to be proactive and learn, much quicker than before technology came along...that's all.
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I also think that it's personal attitude too John. When I went to school I "took" what I wanted, because I knew they weren't going to "pound it in". In grade school, they do tend to pound home the information, but in higher education formats, you need to get aggressive and take what you're paying for, mostly because they're not going to nurse maid you to the next level, like they did in grade school. I do agree with your comments about the instant gratification generations now coming to rise, but I hope the ones that know what they want are indeed taking it, other wise it's simply a wasted tuition. It would be interesting to see how many actually graduate this course. NA courses in the USA are over 70% degreed.
     
  7. Rastapop
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    Rastapop Naval Architect

    From his posts I thought the OP was sitting a test for his master or mate qualifications, not doing an NA degree?
     
  8. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    I get the feeling these sorts of questions and attitudes are from under-grads
    who are very much out of their depth in the course they are doing.

    I get many emails from post-grad students, especially from China, Iran and
    the USA.
    I have had only one "do my homework" type question in about 5 years.
    In nearly all instances they are extremely polite; they only want an
    explanation of the mathematical subtleties (because detailed working is
    usually left out of a published paper), and they are very thankful for the help.
     
  9. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    I think that kind of proves my point.

    The resourceful proactive "I want to learn" ones, and as Paul points out get what they are paying for, they know what they want and how to get it. Asking very basic questions and providing next to zero back ground is just laziness and yields little. Asking you personally, via a PM, very direct questions aimed at nuances in the maths, is poles apart and, what is expected of a student wishing to learn. Pity we don't see more of them on the public forum.
     
  10. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    Cheating is openly condoned in several Indian universities so it's no surprise
    that some of their students trawl forums looking for easy answers.
    Among many recent articles on cheating here's one that doesn't inspire
    confidence in Indian engineering.

    "The students who feel they have the right to cheat"
    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29950843

    How would you like to employ one of those "graduates"?
     
  11. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Sadly, doesn't inspire critical thinking at all, which is what employees need....:(
     
  12. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    It doesn't inspire much confidence in the safety of Indian ships either :)
     
  13. mchl
    Joined: Sep 2013
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    mchl MCHL Stabilitycalculation

    Nobody is doing something wrong. PhilSweet is right, the solution is easy. With only 2 iterations the result is already very accurate :
    You first calculates the initial GM : 0.80m. And after you assume that the Gz curve is straight from 0° to 3°20mn. You can then calculate the inclining moment to heel up to this angle, using the formula :
    GM= Inclining Mmt/(displ*tan(angle of heel)).
    The inclining arm beeing 4m, you find at the first iteration a weight of 87.35 t.
    Assuming that the KM is constant after the weight loss (it only depends of the hull form for a given draft, but the hull sides are vertical for a cargo ship), you can calculate the new KG : 7.75m and the new GM : 0.849m.
    You use again the GM formula with the updated GM and displacement and you find a lost weight of 91.96 t.
    If you make one more iteration, you find the exact weight : 91.90 t.
    You can see that after only 2 iterations, the result accuracy is 0,06 % !:p
     

  14. cmckesson
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    cmckesson Naval Architect

    Learning

    That's a rather frightening article, Leo!
     
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