differences between: Glass-Epoxy-Composite and Fiberglass hulls

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by gp333, May 4, 2009.

  1. McFarlane
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Australia

    McFarlane Macka

    I think there are some people on this forum who think there gods answer to boat building, there is no bible to which repairs have to be done the same way world wide as for building boats as well, yes there are certain things that have to be done the same way, but everyone is different thats why there is so much competition out there, people work in different climates and with different materials and on different boats.I dont think apex knows there is a different world out there other than his, no disrespect to him but I would say he needs to expand his Knowledge and realise there are other people out there that do this for a living as well.
    I have worked for one the best yacht builders in the world ( John McConagy ) and built from 50 ft to 120 ft high performance racing yachts which compete in the Americas cup and round the world races, these yachts are baked in ovens using pre-preg epoxy cloth, carbon and kevlar, I learnt a lot there but i think some people think they know more.
    Macka:rolleyes:
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No comment, in this case I think, is the best comment.
     
  3. McFarlane
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Australia

    McFarlane Macka

    :d :d :d :d :d
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Actually the market shows a trend to the opposite! But how could you know?
     
  5. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Rock-Paper-Scissor === Steel-Aluminum-Fiberglass-Wood

    The problem with this statement is that;
    Not all Steel, AL, Fiberglass or Wood boats are constructed the same...
    I have seem some very well built wood ships, and many lousily built Fiberglass ones.
    Steel and Aluminum are not affordable by most people but I think they are superior to both Wood and Fiberglass.

    A well built built Wood/Epoxy boat has advantages over a pure fiber boat. Being lighter and potentially stronger being one of them. Interesting to remember, Wood does not rot from Sea water, but from rain water. Of course wood worms are another story... I am just saying Rot is not caused by seawater. When I was a kid, I had a wood boat that I would sink every year after summer and come back the next year and refloat it and use it again. It lasted for years. It did get heavy, and the worms got it eventually.
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well, that is it... well built! Naturally we have to compare apples and apples only.
    Regards
    Richard
     
  7. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    I think I actually know answer to that.
    It is Arthur Piver's fault. He designed a very successful trimaran made from wood covered in fiberglass and resin. Many were well built and went all over world, many were built by bad amateurs and gave composite boats a bad name. Epoxy and wood composites are still tied to these amateurs mistakes.
     
  8. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    "Compared by weight poly/glass is the weakest, followed by steel, alu, wood/EP."

    I dont think that statement "holds water"

    I remember hearing some years ago that pound for pound, fibreglass is a lot stronger than steel.

    eg 1/18 steel plate = say ..... 25 pounds
    25 pounds of fibreglass is a lot, lot stronger. than the eqivalent weight in steel.

    you go on to say

    "A wood/EP hull done to the same weight as a steel hull is several times stronger than the steel one."

    which seems to support that vague memory of mine, and contradict the first point.

    Might just be the grammer ........

    Also, I dont think wood e/p is necessarily cheaper than steel and aluminium.

    My 16 foot strip plank canoe cost around $300 for the wood and epoxy, and over $250 for the paints.

    As aluminium doesnt need a paint surface, I have read a few people saying that aluminium workes out the cheapest of all methods.

    Steel sure is expensive to coat as well.
     

  9. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    Where do you use the canoe when you want a bit of on-water exercise?

    Rick W
     
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