Designing a floating boat lift - anyone done it??

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by vinalf, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. vinalf
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    vinalf New Member

    Hi There fellow boaters.

    I am in the process of designing and building a floating boat lift (hydrohoist) to park my boat on. Before I head off down that path I thought I would ask if anyone has ever been there and done that or could point me in a suitbale direction so that I don't make too many mistakes en route.

    Thanks in advance
    Vince Alfonso
     
  2. JPOP
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    JPOP New Member

    your boat lift

    How did the build go?
     
  3. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Our member CDK did such boat lift.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  4. JPOP
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    JPOP New Member

    ever seen the launch pad lift www.launchpadlift.com
     
  5. MatthewDS
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    MatthewDS Senior Member

    You mean one of these?
    [​IMG]

    How large? If it's just something to mess around with for your personal boat, you could probably work it out, but I wouldn't attempt commercial use on a home-designed ship lift.

    Basically, it's just a barge with a wing wall on both of the long sides, that can be flooded or drained using a complex system of pumps. The trick is making sure that it remains stable at all times during the process. My guess would be that the biggest problem would be overcoming the fact that the center of gravity rises dramatically when picking a vessel, making the whole unit want to flip over.

    I know people on this forum are always bringing this up, but it's worth repeating, designing something as complicated as a ship lift is a job for a specialist naval architect.
     
  6. JPOP
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    JPOP New Member

    Attached Files:

  7. Knut Sand
    Joined: Apr 2003
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    Knut Sand Senior Member

    Two large PVC tubes/ pipes, (a "small") opening at the bottom? Compressed air in at the top?
     
  8. MatthewDS
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    MatthewDS Senior Member

    Oh, smaller, I see.

    Knut is probabably on to something, although, depending upon how cold it is where you live, I might use HDPE pipe, as it won't get brittle like PVC pipe.
     
  9. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    I bought one... junked it six months later.

    The ones I have seen that work use a cradle floated on top of large metal pontoons (in one case from a decomissioned pontoon boat). The one thing I would point out is that the volume of air is more important than the preassure.
     

  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    All in all it seems to be a nice idea.

    And that was it..................

    Think deeper and you will forget about it.

    Regards
    Richard
     
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