Design software help needed to make blueprints out of 3d model!

Discussion in 'Software' started by alex_651, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. alex_651
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    Hello

    i have a 3d model of a boat in rhino... i would like to get the panels in 2d to print them and must have the dimentions on them. how can this be done? i used the make2d command and it flattened the panels. but how can i get that panel, add dimentions and print the panel?

    i need to make theblue prints to be able to make the model.

    thanks for your help.
     
  2. J Feenstra
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    J Feenstra Junior Member

    you could use autocad,
     
  3. alex_651
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    ok but how? after importing the model in autocad how can i get the blueprints? can you help me a little bit?

    also cant rhino give me the blueprint with measurements or at least to scale?

    thanks
     
  4. J Feenstra
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    J Feenstra Junior Member

    I use Autocad to generate blueprints by drawing them into autocad. I'm sorry for the vage response, but im no expert in Rhino. What is youre definition of a blue print? If you want to make building plans, them look for a scale on the Rhino model. Them see of the dimensions in autocad matches the scale of the rhino model
     
  5. alex_651
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    i see. i managed to get parts of the model in 2d by using the unroll command. i just need to add the dimentions now (leght of line etc.) . or should i print it and scale it?
     
  6. J Feenstra
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    J Feenstra Junior Member

    depends, I would add some lines on specified distances and overall length,
    and some overall dimensions,
    so you can easely add frames in youre hull,
     
  7. alex_651
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    i will try these out. do you know of any good tutorial which i can follow which show these things?
     
  8. JEM
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    JEM Senior Member

    Exporting to Autocad is what I do. It's the easiest method I've found. AutoCAD has some decent tutorials to get you started. Send me a PM if you want me to take a look at it.
     
  9. kvsgkvng
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    kvsgkvng Senior Member

    A way to print flanttened panel-patterns to scale

    Hello Alex. I have been in your shoes and understand your frustration.

    To understand your problem, let me to reiterate it:
    1. Flattened panels of the model are already developed.
    2. There is a need to produce a hard copy with dimensions.

    The second line is a bit vague. If you need to make pattern print for a small model, then you do not need to dimension it. All you need is to print it in scale and then cut the panels using these prints as templates.

    There are several ways to do it depending on the model size you want to produce. For a model which fits into any printed paper sheet sizes, including large scale printers like for architects, the procedure is pretty straightforward.

    Measure the largest print your printer physically could print. Let's say it is 11"x17" Check that the scale you are working with is acceptable and does fit in the print margines, excluding non-printable areas.

    In your design program, where you have flat pannels, draw a border which would be scaled around your panels. This border size must be calculated in a way, that when printed on 11'x17" sheet, this border would scale your flat panels to the right size reducing the panels to the right size. So, in essence you enlarge your printer margins/border around flat panels you want to print. This should be happening on your screen. So, if you have your model in real life scale constructed within your program, then the border would be much bigger that 11"x17" -- say 220" x 340" if your scale is 1:20. Just multiply 11x20 and 17x20.

    After that when you want to print the panels, all you have to do is to fit this border to in the maximum size of the printed sheet and you should get pretty good match for your model scale. With practice you could arrive to a surprising precision of the printed material, usually laser printers are accurate up to 1/300 of an inch and more!

    There other ways to produce larger size templates, but I am not sure what you want. One of them is to project the panel with a projector. Please be warned that this method is not suited for the actual production. It will generate small errors, which could not be discounted in the real manufacturing. But this method will allow to produce a large scale model for which panels do not fit on one printed sheet.

    Another way to print large chunks of your panels is using programs which print large images in tiles. Then you just glue/tape pages in the right order and you have your large scale pattern to cut!

    Adding dimensions to the panels is completely different subject. It is done with any CAD program after you export your flattened panels to DXF file.

    I hope it helps. Regards.
     
  10. bhnautika
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    bhnautika Senior Member

    Alex 651 I think most of what you want to do can be done in rhino. When you have your cad model finished use the contour command to get section then add XYZ base lines, centre line. Then use the unroll surface command selecting the surface you want plus the corresponding sections on the model, when unrolled you should have a flatten surface with the section lines drawn on it. As you don’t need a surface for the drawing use the duplicacate edge command to create a line for each side then delete the surface. Move and manipulate the new drawing to somewhere convenient. Repeat for all the surfaces. To get the section drawings, pick the section you want plus the base lines/centre line and use the make 2d drawing command in the end view, then do as before moving to where you want them. Dimension the drawings, as you need.
    Rhino will print to a paper size so you can pick a scale to fit that sheet size. One thing to mention is rhino prints what you see so you can use the “only selected objects “ tick box in the print section or the hide command to show only what you want to print. See quick example files rhino model and print file
     

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  11. alex_651
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    exactly what i wanted! thanks Alot i will try them out tonight
     
  12. alex_651
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    is there a way to get all linear dimention of the lines in your 2d model? or you have get ech line dimention by selecting two points (start and end of line and using the) and using the _Dim command?
     
  13. bhnautika
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    bhnautika Senior Member

    Alex 651 the programme always needs to know which points to measure between.
     
  14. alex_651
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    alex_651 Junior Member

    hi., i have some questions:

    do you know what is the command to add the XYZ baselins,

    add the centre line??

    thanks
    Alex

     

  15. DavidJ
    Joined: Jun 2004
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    DavidJ Senior Member

    There aren't commands to just do these things. You have to do them all yourself. If you want a CL draw a line on the centre. If you want a dimension select the dimension tool and pick what you want to dimension. Setting up professional drawings can take hours and hours. You are asking how to I do the job of a design draftsman in a couple of clicks. Rhino is just a tool. It doesn't do the job. I have a hammer, what do I do to build a house?

    Usually I export to autocad, but bhnautika is completely right that you can do all of it in Rhino. Version 4 added substantial improvements in 2D drafting tools. They work very similar to the tools in autocad.

    Here is how I set up a model for doing what you want. I make sure the hull model is positioned so that it is on the origin. Therefore whenever I type 0,0,0 for a coordinate it will give me the origin of my boat. Depending on the client and whether it is an existing boat or a new design that origin can sometimes be midships, sometimes it is the FWD perpendicular, sometimes it is the baseline, sometimes it is the DWL. Wherever it is your model should be built on that same origin. Then I draw a horizontal CL, a baseline, and a vertical CL all originating from 0,0,0. I usually put those on their own layer and lock it, but it isn't necessary. To mark your unrolled plates with lines such as the CL or frame locations you need those lines to be on the surface before it is unrolled. You can do this in many many different ways. Most often I choose the commands "section", "contour", or "project" for this. So you can section your hull on the CL and it will draw a curve right on the surface that follows the CL (again easier if your model is actually positioned with it's CL on 0). Then when you run the unroll command select the curves you want to include. The command will ask you to select the surface to unroll, click the surface, it then asks "select curves on surface to unroll", pick the marking curves you want. If you click on the option to include labels it will put numbers on the edges of your unrolled plate and matching labels on your model which is handy for lining it all up.
     
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