design for lengthening of vessel

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by akrish, Jul 29, 2014.

  1. akrish
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    akrish naval architect

    Dear all
    I am doing R&D work on design for lengthening of vessel, so i have decided to start it with a tugboat. Below are dimensions.
    LOA-33.01m
    LBP-31.22m
    B-9.4m
    D-2.4m
    Can i get some suggestions or help in this, like how to start and any rules required for this.? It will be really helpful to me.

    Thanks and regards
    Anantha krishnan
    ananthakrishnanbena@gmail.com
     
  2. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Can you give more details of what it means lengthening of vessel?. Cut it for the center section and add a cylindrical body of, lets say, 34.56 m in length?
    Forgive my curiosity. Are you really naval architect?. Do not answer if you do not want to.
     
  3. akrish
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    akrish naval architect

    Lengthening of vessel means increasing its length. And for your curiosity i am a naval architect.
    I think you don't know anything about naval architect. As you said, cut a section and add cylindrical body. How is that possible??
    If you don't know anything about it, better your search in the internet and then post a reply.
     
  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Thanks for your kind considerations concerning me. When you realize that you were wrong, I hope, if you're generous enough, to apologize to me. But I do not see probable. It does not matter.
    The best way, practice and more usual, to lengthen a boat, is the one I have described.
    I think you're naval architect because you claim you so, but, really, your questions make me wonder. I am sorry.
     
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  5. rcnesneg
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    rcnesneg Senior Member

    I have seen someone lengthen a 40ish foot catamaran by cutting the middle, pulling it apart 5 feet, and building fiberglass in the middle. That turned out ok.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can lengthen at the ends or the middle. Both systems work but produce different results and have different challenges. You have to find out what the limitations of the vessel are at its present length and what improvements it needs.
     
  7. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    It's basicly a new design after the modifications so you need to start from the scratch. What rules depends what it'll be for ie leisure, work, passanger etc.
     
  8. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Typically, in the case of extending an existing vessel is lengthen in the middle because, among other things, much more payload space, etc is obtained.
    If it is to use an existing mold to build a boat of greater length, is very common, and often the only solution, lengthen stern.
    If what the OP needs is to make a new design based on an existing one, smaller, what he has to do is an affine transformation.
    Therefore, if he does not tell us what he meant by lengthening a boat, we can not give much help.
    The regulations do not say anything about it, only that the new vessel must have sufficient strength and meet the stability criteria, intact and after damage, that apply.
    In some type of boat, when exceeding 24 m in length, change some aspects of the regulations applicable to the ship.
     
  9. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    You can lengthen a vessel by adding a bulbous bow.
     
  10. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    The most cost effective method is to get a shorter ruler and then declare the vessel lengthened whilst using generous amounts of pomp. No silly cylinders needed.
     
  11. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Or maybe lengthening the stern, below or above the waterline. Reducing the bow rake also increase length.
     

  12. AndySGray
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    AndySGray Senior Member

    What?
    Why?
    Eh?
    Really?
    Huh?
    :?:
    :confused:

    :!:
    I am a Rocket Scientist :cool: and have decided it shall be quite tall and a bit pointy on one end
    (at the moment the top end is the one I feel should be pointy as my first design with a pointy base fell over a lot...:eek:)
    :!:

    If you design jewelry which a lady wears in her belly button, are you a Navel Architect:D

    I am not a Naval Architect - you say it's an R&D project but thats a pretty amateur and ill-considered start for one who claims the distinction?



    A good question is Homogeneous or Heterogeneous? (Same or Different);-

    Are you starting with a Tug and finishing with a longer Tug,
    or
    Are you starting with a Tug and finishing with a longer Bouy Tender/Private Yacht/Fishing Boat/Cable Layer/Cargo Vessel/Hospital Ship/Landing Craft/Dive Tender/Survey Ship? (some of these are clearly not as good ideas).

    Why is it being lengthened - can the same result be achieved by e.g. moving or redesigning accommodation and tankage

    Some tugboats are designed to be maneuverable - is adding length going to have an effect?

    Is it going to be used in similar sea states or is additional reinforcement of existing structures needed.

    Is this a new build - a longer reworking of a proven existing design already in use and owned by the (hypothetical) company which has commissioned you...

    Or is it part of a Rebuild/Refit while an existing vessel will be drydocked

    It is impossible to get a right answer until you start asking the right questions.
     
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