Design For A Small Outboard Fast Cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ILHEU, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. ILHEU
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    Location: MADEIRA/PORTUGAL

    ILHEU Mr

    Hello,I am new in this forum and I am looking for small outboards fast cruiser plywood plans.As I live in a small island with plenty of water all around one of my dreams is to build a boat.Since I do not have any experience in boat building or drawing,I will need some advices but now I am looking for plans or for someone to draw the boat I really need,it must have a length of +/- 6.95 meters,trailerable,outboard on transom brackett,acomodations for up to four,etc.I have done some skteches but I do not know how to draw the plans.Can anyone help me?

    Best regards
    HernĂ¢ni Teixeira
     
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  2. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Google Glen-L boats. They have plans and kits that are ideally suited for either first time or experienced builders. This is not a commercial, I have never built a Glen-L boat but I know some pleased people who have done so.
     
  4. ILHEU
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    Location: MADEIRA/PORTUGAL

    ILHEU Mr

  5. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Attached Files:

  6. ILHEU
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    ILHEU Mr

    I know that but as I am not a professional , just a boat lover ,I need to know if it is possible to be done?

    Best regards
     
  7. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Yes, it can be done, if you have the BS 1088 marine ply and use WEST SYSTEM or Silvertip.

    http://www.wessex-resins.com/

    http://www.boatbuildingsupplies.co.uk/acatalog/Silvertip_Range.html

    Read every "how to" article at

    http://bateau2.com/content/section/5/28/

    and also post your sketch on the forum. Ask questions, they are very helpful.

    http://forums.bateau2.com/viewforum.php?f=9

    Jacques will probably suggest the DE23 is nearest to your idea. The portholes and the broken sheerline are mainly cosmetic, and he will advise you what to do, when you buy the plans. Choose metric 117.80 Euros.

    http://www.bateau.com/studyplans/DE23_study.htm?prod=DE23

    Good luck,

    Pericles
     
  8. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    I have been down this path - be warned DONT design - buy a plan - follow the instructions - these sites have fantastic on line help and forums. It will SAVE YOU MONEY.

    Personally i would go smaller - bigger is much more difficult than what it seems. Here are two beautifull boats
    http://www.bateau.com/studyplans/HM19_study.htm?prod=HM19
    http://www.glen-l.com/designs/cruiser/cabinskiff.html

    I have spent a lot off time on the internet and the above 2 sites are the best by far in my opinion - nothing else comes close. if you find something better let me know - but i dont think you will:D
     
  9. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    The Harbour Master 19 is flat bottomed. ILHEU says he lives in Madeira, either an Atlantic island, or Oleiros, Portugal.

    http://www.madeira-web.com/camera/cam-01.html

    http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=mad...GB:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&sa=N&tab=wl

    If it's the island, there are no coastal waters to speak of there. A DE23 is stable enough to pass the RCD Category B certification process, but the HM19 is Category C. The 16 feet long Glen-L Cabin Skiff even smaller, Category D is what I'd give it.

    http://www.ceproof.com/recreational_craft_directive.htm

    They are both good boats Manie B, but if ILHEU lives on the island, the Atlantic is just outside the harbour walls.

    Regards,

    Pericles
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    :D Thanks Pericles for the post - blimey i enjoyed the camera / google pages, havent seen that before - been on the internet for donkey years and learning every day:D

    I bow to your superior knowledge of the rules. I for get as i am 650 km from the sea.:D
     
  11. ILHEU
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    ILHEU Mr

    Yes I live in the Madeira Island , and I need a good sea boat,not an intracoastal,more freeboard,more power,more security.I think it will belong more to CEE class B,small enought to be trailerable.Madeira Island is a beautyfull place with plenty of sea and places to explore only acessible by sea:cool:

    regards
     
  12. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    ILHEU,

    Take a look at the boats some fishermen in Alaska and California are using. The Tolman Jumbo varies between 22-24 feet in length. Scroll down.

    http://www.fishyfish.com/tolmanskiff.html

    It fits on a trailer, but also has good accommodation. The website should give you confidence in that type of boat and also the DE23 or DE25, which are very similar. If you build the boat yourself. it does not need to have RCD certification and you can sell the boat 5 years after you finally complete it. Keep all the receipts for the materials and equipment to prove your case and then you can eventually apply for an exemption certificate.

    http://www.ceproof.com/Marine/Applications/exemptioncertificate.php

    I can tell you that these boats will easily comply with Category C. Read the next thread for more information.

    http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?t=21826&highlight=pericles

    Read as much as you can. There are many here with very good advice and you will soon learn about the fine art of boatbuilding.

    Regards,

    Pericles
     
  13. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    I guess we do have a difference on the capabilities here. The charts say that, if the DE23 is a category B, it is safe to cross the English channel about 80% or more of the time. I seriously doubt that, although I have crossed the channel only twice. I think you may be optimistic on all counts with the DE23 and the H19. I would not consider any of these boats offshore capable in more than a short dash beyond inshore water. I would rather be out in the Cabin Skiff than the H19 in bad conditions. I would place the DE23 as category C.

    I'm sure we are looking at these boats and the category definitions differently and would be interested in how to arrive at a proper category for any particular boat.
     
  14. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Tom,

    You raise extremely good points, but CEproof included a chart that surprised me and I think will surprise you also. I tried to upload it, but it was invalid. You'll have to click.

    http://www.ceproof.com/Marine/rcd_design_category.htm

    I have on occasion crossed a millpond Channel in the early morning. One trip by hovercraft in 1981 from Dover - Calais took 20 minutes at 70 mph. It was stunning, but the spray was so high, nothing was visible. We were able to enjoy the delicious French cafe au lait for longer and still keep to our driving schedule that day. :D :D

    Thanks for your interest and best regards,

    Perry
     

  15. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    Perry,

    My trips across the Channel were on the Vomit Comet from Poole to St Malo and return. The trip back was in the remains of the storm that hit the Fastnet (I think) last year in August. No big waves but big swells that made some people sick, even on that huge cat.

    My judgment on suitability of these boats is based on my somewhat limited experience with small boats in the ocean. I ran no numbers nor looked at any other qualifying data. After some quarter million miles on the water with probably 90% of that in ships, I know that it is more often than not, pretty calm. Can't depend on it though even if the charts you mention back up my own experience in this. Much as I don't like deep V hulls for most uses, if I'm going on the ocean in a small monohull, that is what I want. Flat, like the HM19 or very low deadrise like the DE23 is not what I'd want out there. Even the Cabin Skiff has a sharper entry than either of the others. I don't trust government formulae to dictate what is safe or not safe. They often have other agendas.

    Other opinions, hopefully well informed, would be good. This includes your reasoned comments. My oldest son who works for NOAA as a hydographer/scientist was for a time assigned to the survey ship Rude. I think it may have been some 150' or so LOA but it has a flat bottom. After a short time, it was restricted to surveys in areas where it could come in to a protected port each night. Its movement in any moderately rough sea was not good. The Rude was decomissioned last weekend and Mark went to Norfolk to cheer with the other crew members. Now, some subcontractor will deal with it.
     
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