Definition of coastal cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Raysea Lady, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. Raysea Lady
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Raysea Lady Junior Member

    Hi,

    I am a new member of the forum and have been searching for over an hour to find what is the definition of a coastal cruiser. Wave handling capacity, range etc... does the coast guard or any other agency put out some minimum specifications for a boat to be called a coastal cruiser?

    If anyone could point me in the right direction to find this info, it would be greatlly appreciated.

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I suggest you look at the European standards for the Recreational Craft Directive

    A Category C boat is considered the minimum for a coastal cruiser

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
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  3. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    It's difficult thing to pin down really. It's not specifically defined, but the way it will differ from an offshore boat would be:

    *Food and water stores can be smaller
    *Does not need to be self sufficient for a month at a time
    *Parts and repairs can be sourced ashore, rather than in some remote place
    *Usually smaller, lighter and cheaper than an offshore boat
    *May have an incomplete sail inventory if it's used as a weekender by someone not serious about performance
    *Costs less than an offshore boat because it's not as complex.

    There is no hard and fast rule. Boats are boats, for the most part. I'd say the distinction might be easier to make if you ask, "What makes an offshore cruising boat?"

    The offshore cruising boat is an add-on to the coastal cruiser, so it is slightly easier to define.

    Don't get too hung up on the definition though. You can coastal cruise on anything, including an offshore boat, though you'd be spending a lot of unnecessary money on an offshore boat to do that.

    Lastly, don't assume you need any less quality boat for costal cruising than offshore. The waves aren't much less coastwise than offshore. They still pack the same punch and winds do too.
     
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  4. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    No official definition that I'm aware of in the US or Canada.

    The ISO standards for recreational boats used in Europe have four Design Categories with associated wind strength and significant wave heights, but none are "coastal cruiser" per se.
    A – ’Ocean’
    B – ’Offshore’
    C – ’Inshore’
    D – ’Sheltered waters’

    What is your interest?
     
  5. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    There's also a question of which coast. Cruising along the west coast of Vancouver Island or the north shore of Lake Superior is very different than cruising along the coast of Maine.
     
  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    As DCocky states, in Europe, a coastal cruiser will be built and fit out to class standard . These standards cover equipment like the type of hatches ,the robustness of the hull and its fittings like waterproof bulkheads, plus safety gear.

    Dont be put off by the term coastal cruiser..they are great boats for the majority of cruising that normal people do.
     
  7. Raysea Lady
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    Raysea Lady Junior Member

    Thanks for the info.

    My interest lies in the fact that my boat is a Bluewater which is sold as a Coastal Cruiser. But, since the factory is shut down, it is difficult to identify what the criteria is for a Coastal Cruiser. There must be some specs to define it otherwise, they could call a canoe a Coastal Cruiser.

    I have cruised it all over the Great lakes with no issues whatsoever other than a few folks referring to it as a river boat. So I was just trying to get some information so as to get it straight in my mind.
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Post a picture of your boat (from athwartships) and let us know what motor, tankage, sails (if any), displacement, etc... the boat has. We'll tell you very quickly if it's a "coastal cruiser" or one made to cross oceans. :D

    I put a smile in because I'm joking, but only a little bit. You'll know in seconds.
     
  9. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    I wouldn't agree with your assumption that there must be a definition for a "Coastal Cruiser". Sounds to me like a term used for marketing; one which conveys an idea without making any promises.

    What sort of cruising have you done around the Great Lakes. Lake Superior in late October? Okay, that may be a bit extreme but the Great Lakes are large and varied. There is a big difference between relatively short segments from one protected harbor or bay to another while keeping an eye on the weather, and an overnight trip across one of the lakes.
     
  10. Raysea Lady
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    Raysea Lady Junior Member

    Hi all,

    thanks for the input.

    The boat is definitely not made for ocean crossings. Engines are twin 450 turbo cummins and fuel tankage is one 480 gallon tank.

    We just got back from 5 weeks on lake Huron, Lake Michigan and the North channel. Last year we had spent 4 weeks on lake huron also. We have also cruised the length of Lake Erie several times and lake ontario, cruised the erie canals, the hudson and down the coast to charleston. Worst waters I have been in with it is 7 to 9 footers on lake Huron in 40 knot winds with no issues other than not as comfortable as one would like.:D

    Although I have never been on lake superior, Bluewaters are made in Mora Minnesota and launched on Lake superior for delivery.
     

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  11. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    You have a coastal cruiser and seem ready for more.
     
  12. Raysea Lady
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    Raysea Lady Junior Member

    Thanks,

    I just found this on the web and from this, my boat would be a class C which seems to fit well.


    Boat Design Category
    This is primarily related to the stability or, for small dinghies, the recoverability
    of the boat and will be one of the following:-
    A OCEAN: Designed for extended voyages where conditions may exceed
    wind force 8 (Beaufort scale) and significant wave heights of 4 m and above,
    and vessels largely self-sufficient.
    B OFFSHORE: Designed for offshore voyages where conditions up to, and
    including, wind force 8 and significant wave heights up to, and including, 4 m
    may be experienced.
    C INSHORE: Designed for voyages in coastal waters, large bays,
    estuaries, lakes and rivers where conditions up to, and including, wind force
    6 and significant wave heights up to, and including, 2 m may be
    experienced.
    D SHELTERED WATERS: Designed for voyages on small lakes, rivers,
    and canals where conditions up to, and including, wind force 4 and
    significant wave heights up to, and including, 0.5 m may be experienced.
    The builder’s plate will display a simple A, B C or D as the case may be.
     
  13. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    You seem a perceptive sea-person from your thoughtful communications and already know the 3 sacred rules of boats since you are doing your research well and defining the limits of your present boat and therefore enhancing your decision making in its use on new waters:
    1. Don't be stupid.
    2. Fecal events happen.
    3. Bring beer.
     
  14. Raysea Lady
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    Raysea Lady Junior Member

    For an extended trip, beer, wine and drambuie are paramount...:D and if you follow #1 religiously there should be very little of #2...:D

    Thanks to everyone, the information supplied on here helped me find what I was looking for on the web.

    I had no doubt that it is a coastal cruiser, I was just looking for proof that it is.
    Now, I can lay those riverboat comments to rest as comments from people who just don't know any better. :)
    Thanks again, at least now, I don't need a shot of Drambuie everytime anyone makes one of those comments... :)
     

  15. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "Cruising along the west coast of Vancouver Island or the north shore of Lake Superior is very different than cruising along the coast of Maine."

    Not really , Neither will be picked up and thrown across the water surface., or dropped 10-15 ft.

    Neither will have waves running over the decks and perhaps PH for hours on end.

    Offshore big waves and sound structure are the rule , this raises the cost of construction , and operation.

    FF
     
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