deep sea mooring

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by exp30002, Mar 16, 2018.

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  1. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    I am interested about developing a deep sea mooring site off the coast of Southern California. ( Los Angeles - San Diego )
    Preferably outside the 12 nautical miles territorial waters, using recycled waste car tires for buoy and line.
    (ringupcycle, ring weave technology, and more... ) ( for kelp, FAD, fish farm, possible OTEC )
    Start up money could come from recycle fee of waste tires. That would be upfront at the time of
    picking up the tires from waste tire generators.
    Vehicles would be necessary, a truck and a boat. I have a van with a hitch. I can get a trailer.
    I could manage a boat too. I have some sailing experience in the area.
    A waste tire hauler permit is also necessary (California). I think, I can manage a permit too.

    Any input is appreciated.
    How would it go with the PR, (public relations), coast guard, Navy, merchant marines, sport fishers, local gov, Greenpeace, and other environmentalists ???

    Main aim is to grow kelp.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,418
    Likes: 333, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You will have two main hurdles. The first is technological: the depth past the 12 mile limit is from 300 to more than 1000 feet. The second is legal: the USA claims 200 miles economic zone.
     
  3. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    Hi gonzo;

    Thank you for your response.

    Yes, those are all challenges. The depth is a challenge, and there are lots of used car tires.
    The more tires I can use the more recycling fees I can collect. Lots of tires: 40 million in Ca per year.

    The EEZ, alias Exclusive Economic Zone: I often wonder about this. To whom is it exclusive?
    I am a United States citizen. That might work for me.

    Though, I would prefer the high seas, so outside of EEZ. More depth, more tires, more recycling money.

    The main goal is not the money, though it is important, it would be kelp, and ocean activity.

    And may be a platform, somewhere on the high seas where boat building would be possible under the
    rules of the high seas, and governmental rules would apply into a much less extent. And other economic
    activities would be possible with much less extent of governmental regulations.

    And, may be yes, may be no, and I am not in the hurry.

    Kind regards;
     
  4. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    You will have two main hurdles.;

    Well, hehe. -))) I expect many main hurdles. I expect there are main hurdles I cannot see yet.
    But more than just two.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,418
    Likes: 333, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    I am not sure how you will make a mooring chain from tires
     
  6. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    Chain??? I might not use chain.
     
  7. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    Anchoring of the floating device might be done with other, non conventional methods, and
    not with anchor chain. The so called 'ring weave technology' makes it possible to weave tire rings
    together. A large sheet of woven material can be produced. The basic building block is a used tire
    with the rims cut off.

    The large woven sheet can be rolled into a tube. I estimate the diameter of the tube about minimum
    6 feet or 2 meters. The maximum diameter of the tube is limited by the number of tires woven together.
    A long tube could be woven that would be vertical position in the water column.
    When the length of the tube would be larger than the hight of the water column, the tube would anchor itself.

    I estimate the length of the tube would be twice the hight of the water column.
    (The hight of the water column is the same as the depth. It just depends the way of looking at it from the
    surface or from the seabed.)

    A suction anchor might be a good idea, but it depends on the depth and technical ability.

    Car tires sink, but close to the point of floating. (The specific gravity of the tire is a little bit higher than the specific gravity of the sea water,
    but not much higher.)
    It might be possible to attach some floating objects (buoys) on the surface and anchors at the end that rests on the seabed.

    Short anchor chains could be used to connect anchors to the tube at the seabed end. These anchor chains would not be
    produced from used car tires. There might be the conventional way to get these short anchor chains, buying them.
     
  8. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

  9. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

  10. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

  11. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    It is also possible to do computer digital images of it in SketchUp

    [​IMG]

    Computer generated, (SketchUp) model by Cowboy Kim Cowdroy:
     
  12. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

  13. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    [​IMG]

    Original idea of ringupcycle Gerd Weiland
     
  14. chinaseapirate

    chinaseapirate Previous Member

    I have a truck. I can load 51,000+ lbs of tires on it per trip. So what is that? $1000-$1500/trip ? And do you know how to slice them up the way you want for little or no cost? like 2 cents of electricity and 3 cents of saw blades?
    I build boats last one I built could carry (above water) 1/2 of a truckload at 10 mph at about 70-80 cents/mile. Although, maybe I could get a really inexpensive sail to help- or better just a MORE efficient design(bigger). Where would you transfer transfer tires from truck to "ship". The way I see it you only need to go 25-30 miles out. yes 200 is better but your gonna need a ship to defeat the cost of transporting them. At 24 mi out the customs is not "supposed" to board and search for undocumented "fellow yachtsmen". And they can't work on a fishing boat. But if you are able to get enough friends to help dangle fish attraction devices there is the nice deep water off Santa Monica even less than 12 miles out. Always free food there also. I'm interested if you are serious and can get the recycling license. What do you do with the sidewalls?
     

  15. chinaseapirate

    chinaseapirate Previous Member

    I'm not visualizing how to close the tube without tying it with something. I can see the large woven sheet but aren't you still going to have to put a rope through the tire loops to finish the tube? whatever small expense if I'm right. Great idea. I could pick up 1500 tires and help you and a friend load them onto load them onto the boat. The two of you could weave them all together and meet me back the next afternoon for 1500 more. or even better i could make 3 or 4 trips a day and you and a few more friends could weave 6000 tires a day. It looks feasible to build a 250 ft ship out of 75% tires that could bring them out 200+ miles especially if you can stitch them together with the dense wire contained in the sidewall lip. Definitely have to cover it with animal skins or something though. No, they might actually be buoyant on their own... easy to find out.
     
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