Decking Question.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Evil_Fish, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. Evil_Fish
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Location: SoCal

    Evil_Fish Junior Member

    I am working out the details of buying this skiff that I found online and had a few questions about what I can do.

    [​IMG]
    http://www.boatdesign.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/21746

    [​IMG]
    http://www.boatdesign.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/21745

    It is 22’x8’, use to be used commercially in Alaska. My plans are to add a low deck to it so the kids will not trip over the stringers. I would also like to add a center console. At this time I do not have the equipment to weld aluminum so I was thinking of making a glassed in plywood deck.
    Questions-
    1. Should I even be thinking about using wood?
    2. How would you seal the edge of the decking where it meets the hull?
    3. Could I use wood for building the support structure or should I have it welded in?
    Thanks
     
  2. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    1. Should I even be thinking about using wood?
    By all means you can use wood, and in fact wood is a good choice.

    2. How would you seal the edge of the decking where it meets the hull?
    I would coat the wood with epoxy and paint it. make it so it comes to within a 1/4" or so from the hull and fill the gap with a polysulfide or polyurethane, you could use silicone too, but it would not be my first choice.

    3. Could I use wood for building the support structure or should I have it welded in? Use wood if its easier for you. Either drill and tap to fasten it or fasten right through the stringers and crossmembers.

    Looks like a good candidate for what you want to do, center console would be nice.

    Looks like a nice boat, have fun.

    Steve :cool:
     
  3. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    You wouldn't have to make a glassed in deck, but could make it of 1x6 boards like a patio deck that you could remove slats once in a while to clean underneath. You couldn't use treated wood as it will corrode aluminum, but redwood would be a good choice.
     
  4. Evil_Fish
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Location: SoCal

    Evil_Fish Junior Member

    I was actual thinking of doing this as a temporary fix so I could fish it while it was still had tiller setup. I'm not sure how that would work (at least for me) with the cc.

    Thanks for the suggestions guys. I was originaly going to build a 16-18' plywood boat but I could not pass this one by.
     
  5. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    The vessel already has structural integrity, so all you have to have for a deck is something strong enough to be a deck, it doesn't need to be part of the structure. You don't want it any heavier than it has to be, but you want it to last. Good quality plywood with a couple of coats of epoxy resin and then paint on the top (or truck bed liner, or whatever finish you want) will do that as light as possible and the next time the deck needs to be replaced it will be your middle aged adult children doing it.

    Fiberglass itself is not necessary and will add nothing but weight.

    When I see that term "glassed in plywood deck" it makes me cringe.

    Steve
     
  6. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I would build sections of cleated slats for easy removal. I wouldn't complicate things by using epoxy or finishes. I'd buy 1 x 6 Port Orford cedar, and run it fore and aft with 1/4" spaces between boards.
    I'd screw the floorboards to 2 x 2 pressure treated cleats with stainless wood screws.
    The pressure treated wood will help protect the underside of the cedar from rot.
    This is probably the easiest and cheapest and most attractive way to go. The cedar will bleach grey or you can stain or paint to taste.
     
  7. davhill
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: Massachusetts

    davhill Junior Member

    I'm with Allen on this .. nearly exactly what I've done with our 16' utility skiff. Keeps your gear out of the bilge, lets rainwater drain through and is easy to remove for cleaning. Leave a gap so you can pull the transom drain without lifting floorboards . Dave
     
  8. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    I concur with post 6 & 7!
     

  9. Evil_Fish
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Location: SoCal

    Evil_Fish Junior Member

    Thanks guys. I just finalized the purchase of it today. I wont even get a chance to pick it up for 2 weeks. Its a 19 hour drive to go get it... I will post some more pictures once I get it home.
     
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