Decking Choice?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ddrdan, Oct 25, 2010.

  1. ddrdan
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: Raleigh NC

    ddrdan Junior Member

    I could just glass everything but I thought FRP would reduce the labor issue to 'joining' only.

    I was looking for decking choices and found FRP (slip resistant) in load bearing capacity. Application will be pontoon decking with a watertight cabin area. There is also an 1/8" FRP laminated to 1/4" luan I was considering for a roof material.

    I am trying to achieve minimal exterior maintenance. Painting seems so 'passe':)o) with all the tech products that are available?


    Pro's / Cons????????
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Weight is an issue, as are cost and flexibility. 1/4" stuff over a reasonable substrate might be interesting, but price it out against sheathing some plywood and see where you stand.
     
  3. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Minimal exterior maintenance is achieved with a very simple method used by millions of people with great success:
    They don't have a boat :p
    Daniel
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There are two materials that may work for you. One is the material for truck sides and doors. It is plywood with fiberglass veneer. A lighter material is the foam core, aluminum faced panels made for decking on houses. It is rated structural and has a non-skid surface.
     
  5. ddrdan
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    ddrdan Junior Member

    Thanks PAR,

    1/2" FRP or 3/4" ply w/glass for decking is a toss up weight wise. Cost is double. I'm thinking it's worth that for longevity and durability in the base to the whole vessel? Plus, my deck is integrated into the pontoon, not sitting above it.

    By "flexibility" do you mean it should have some flex or not have flex?
     
  6. ddrdan
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    ddrdan Junior Member

    I meant to say "Pro's .... Con's .... Humor". :D
     
  7. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Help Boost American Rep Points! I approve this Message

    Another Excellnt deck material is to go to Homy Depot/Sams clunb and get the interlocking rubber foam antifatigue mats and just contact cement them down on your PT Plywwod.

    It looks great and are Comfortable an your beer bottle wont break when you drop it. ( Trust me, You Will Drop it). Also absorbs impact from many other sources and keeps the deck tempature moderated. You can lay some indoor outdoor plastic grass right over it in your colour preferance of Traditional Green or Trailer Park Blue.

    Also all the potato chips, Blood, fish guts, Beer, Ban Du Sole' & Margarettis wash right off at ghe end of a hard day using nothing more than a garden hose and some Joy dish detergant.

    Its Cheap and Stylish and Durable.


    [​IMG]
     
  8. MatthewDS
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    MatthewDS Senior Member

    We use a fair amount of that stuff building boat harbors. Typically this brand:

    http://www.fibergrate.com/frp-products/fiberplate.aspx

    It's nearly indestructible against foot traffic, and remains effective when wet, icy or covered in snow.

    However, I'm not sure that you can glue to it. Typically, it is mechanically fastened (SS bolts) to a timber or steel backing. I also don't think you can seal up the seams between the panels, so you will have gaps for water to enter every 4 feet or so.

    Call the manufacturer rep, and ask them if it can be glued. This stuff isn't cheap, and reps work on commision, so they are always willing to help.
     
  9. ddrdan
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    ddrdan Junior Member

    That's a great link. Thanks. They have better span capacities than the one I found, but their #/SF is much higher.

    Info I've found:

    You can resin the joints. Using a spline helps. You can lap to it with any resin system. Attachment is unlimited. Use of resin for adhesion to wood recommended. Has a good "pull out" for screws. Span capacities aren't bad, even when using the .5".
     
  10. ddrdan
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    ddrdan Junior Member

    :D:D:D
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Compared to other materials it's heavy, costly and has other issues. Given it's physical properties, I wouldn't use it in structural applications, unless it was static, which a boat isn't. On the other hand the thin overlays offer by some other manufactures could be glued to a reliable substrate, but again at considerable cost.
     

  12. ddrdan
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    ddrdan Junior Member

    Thanks Par. After a good research review and the advice on here I'm going back to wood.

    I have found a UV resistant rubber laminate to avoid painting. Thanks for the idea direction MatthewDS.
     
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