Deck Replacement - Protecting the motor.

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by AuxiliaryComms, Sep 14, 2008.

  1. AuxiliaryComms
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: Hayes, VA

    AuxiliaryComms Master work in progress

    I'm getting ready to pull up the decks on my 1969 Trojan. They're plywood with a vinyl cover and they've gone soft. I'm concerned that they're holding water against good wood so even though I'm not ready to replace the decks, I'm going to need to be able to pull it all out.

    The biggest item I'm concerned about is keeping the motor safe. I will be removing parts over the coming weeks to take home and clean up and I want to make sure the engine doesn't rust up inside or out.

    What steps do I need to take to ensure the motor doesn't get any worse that it already is while the decks are up (possibly months)?

    Do I need to wait until I can afford to build some sort of temporary structure over top of the boat?
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Remove the spark pugs and spark arrestor on the carb. Using old oil change oil, begin pouring oil into the oil filler neck, until it starts coming out one of the spark plug holes or the dip stick hole (which ever is lower). If the dip stick hole leaks first, then remove the dip stick and drive a golf tee (yep, a regular old golf tee) into the dip stick tube, until it wedges tight enough to stop the leak. Continue pouring until the spark plugs start to leak, place a spark plug in each as they begin to leak. Continue filling, until it comes out the valve cover breathers. Plug these and continue filling until the oil can be seen up in the throat of the carb. This takes about 5 gallons of oil (which is why you use old oil). It literally fills the engine with oil and it can't rust. When ready to return to service, drain the oil, replace the parts that were removed or altered to hold back oil and you're engine is exactly as you left it, except it's covered internally with oil, which it loves. The longest I've personally stored a motor in this condition is 7 years, but I know of several that have lived this way for a couple of decades. Other then a little smoke after intial start up (gone in 5 miniutes), these engines were exactly as they were when first stored.
     
  3. AuxiliaryComms
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: Hayes, VA

    AuxiliaryComms Master work in progress

    Thanks again, PAR.
     
  4. mongo75
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Orange County California

    mongo75 Senior Member

    WOW, great idea!
     
  5. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    im not sure boating and golfing fit together hehe :D
     
  6. Kay9
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Central Coast Oregon US.

    Kay9 1600T Master

    Might also consider shrink wrapping the engine. This will keep any flying wood debris out of the engine.

    K9
     
  7. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    make a wooden box you can stick over it.
     
  8. mongo75
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Orange County California

    mongo75 Senior Member


    UUUGHHHH- you had to remind me that I keep my 440 (with one of the heads off) right in front of my table saw- yeah, that's gonna be funn cleaning one day......
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Moisture from condensation will eventually rust up the cylinder walls and other components, even if shrink wrapped, just from the temperature fluctuations in the place the engine is being stored.

    If you don't expect a very long stay, before she's "fired" again, then just "fog" the engine with a winterizing lube. This works okay for a few months.
     
  10. Kay9
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Central Coast Oregon US.

    Kay9 1600T Master

    Mongo I left mine outside with the heads off. So dont feel bad ;)

    K9
     
  11. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    PAR's suggestion of flooding the whole thing with oil makes a lot of sense if it'll be a while before the engine's ready to be used again. This should preserve the engine pretty well for years. Do be careful, though: used oil is great, but be sure it's free of metal filings which could cause damage if they stay in there. And make sure you get it all out before trying to start up again!

    The fogging oil used to flood cylinders and 2-stroke crankcases holds corrosion at bay and keeps the moving parts from seizing, at least over winter or sometimes up to a year. But it's a low-viscosity oil and is designed to burn off easily- convenient, but not nearly as long-term a solution as flooding to the brim with regular crankcase oil.

    I think a box of some kind to keep debris off the motor is a great idea- even a cardboard appliance box with some scrap lumber to reinforce it would work. Shrink wrapping seems likely to lead to condensation problems; if you've flooded with oil the internals will be OK but there are many external parts that could still rust. (Actually, giving them a thin spray of oil too might help.)
     

  12. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    marvins mystery oil,,,,,,great stuff,,, but not as cheap as used motor oil hehe ;)
     
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