Deck Removal

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by aboyd, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 23
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    Hey guys I have a quick questions about my 25' hardtop to centre console conversion. If I support my hull with multiple contact points is it inadvisable to remove deck from hull at joint. I have been told by a co-worker that the hull sides will most likely springout and be out of shape. Is this a common problem or is it from improper supporting of the hull. Sorry I don't have any picks of the project yet I can't seem to find patch cord for my camera. Thanks
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You will haver to do a complete structural redesign. The hull is a box beam. If you remove the deck it will twist and maybe break apart.
     
  3. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    IMO, we're not building a piano here. Support the thing evenly and have fun. If it were to spring/sag/flop a little...put it back if you want. I'd welcome an inch or two more topside beam. It's glass, right?
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A few 2x4's athwartship will keep the sides of the hull from flopping around. The bottom should be supported along the keel and chines well.

    If you're going to walk around inside the hull, directly on the hull shell then additional support may be warranted, to keep things from distorting under your weight.

    You will need to provide some additional athwartship stiffness (as Gonzo alluded to) as a center console, because removing the deck and hardtop also removes considerable athwartship strength, which must be replaced.

    At this point we're shooting in the dark without pictures of your project.

    Mark, if the topsides were "flared" outboard a good bit, the bottom would cup upwards, creating a lovely suction at speed and not a good suggestion for a center console, that will likely plane off at high speed.
     
  5. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    I just have not seen very much movement on boats this size. I have supported well from under, just with blocks and wedges by feel and never had a problem that I know. The new construction, on the other hand, is well stiffened by a cuddy forward and some type of beefed up gunnels, no? It's just such a pain to have supporting members, inside or out, maintaining a shape. Certainly, if I felt that there was enough weight to spring a hollow in the running surface, I would brace from outside before setting the new deck/console in place, but not walk around/step over bracing unless I had to.
    Hey, fellow, PAR is more qualified to have his advice heeded than I, so go with what he says. It's just that I don't have all that much respect for most of these "designed" boats anyway (if poly, they often "oil can" and a running surface is hollow anyway and needs refinement), I use my eye extensively, lay straight-edges where appropriate, and make, I feel, a better boat than what came in.
     
  6. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    Thanks and finally have some pics...

    Thanks everybody for responding to my questions. here are a couple shots of the boat. U can see on the deck the 4 inch or so cap that I want to cut along on the inside edge continuing all the way around the boat. There is also acouple shots of the transom and cuddy floor thats a stringer there poken out of the water. Its quite surprising to that much there because the bow is about 4" higher than the stern tells me the holes are plugged along keel.. Also the hull is quite thick on this boat the pencilis there just for a reference. This weekend I'm going to drop the outdrive and pull the motor. I don't mind doing this amount of work to it seeing how I only paid $2000 and the 351 windsor was rebuilt in 2000 bills to prove. plus the bota has minimal hours on it since rebuild.
     

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  7. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    anti-fouling paint removal

    hey guys I have another question for U all. the picture shows what looks like a forty' outerlimits on its tail. how hard would this be on a transom to hull joint if it was nose up even more. I would like to build a tilt bed mechanism that would allow me to stand the boat almost vertical (which can be achieved due to the fact of being part time farmer euipment is no problem). The resson I'am asking is my hull has a massively thick and hard layer of anti-fouling paint on it due to it being docked, the boat will always be on a trailer now so I wan't rid of it. I tried to sand but that was strenous at best so I figured a good sand blast, blemishes filled smoothed and painted after wouldn't be too hard. My previous job for 6 years was an industial sandblaster painter and I blasted a few sailboats for the local boat yard. would U do this prior to replacing stringers or do it when the hull has been strengthed considerably. Thanks again ...
     

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  8. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    I would use a chemical stripper, scrape, random orbital sand. Just get the bottom paint off for now. After everything is rebuilt, you are going to want to lay a straight-edge along the aft edge of the running surface. Media blasting tends to find porosity most when something distracts the operator...
    As far as the caprail, I would consider leaving it as best as possible and incorporating it into the new design.
     
  9. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    And the fun begins...

    Hey everybody have a few more pics of the mess that I have gotten myself into. Glad I had never taken the boat out. The amount of rot and delamination of glass is startling. The engine beds are totally decomposed, but the glass is ok, only found this after sticking my drills driver bit through fiberglass. The lag bolts holding engine mounts spin freely in their holes, now thats a little scary. Especialy when my wife can't swim. HHHMMM now that I think of that a little bit more that might be a godsend lol ....:D
     

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  10. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    epoxy question

    Has any body out there used the us composites epoxy. price comparison to the west system is alot more resonable. $65 for a gallon and a half kit.
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    On a repair job like yours you can use any epoxy, even the cheapest! But be sure you buy Epoxy!!! There are faux products on the US market, one is named "Fiberglass Epoxy" but in fact is just polyester. (3M I think)
    Make sure you dry out the area completely before applying the glass/resin.
    Do┬┤nt blast the paint off, you are pretty fast through the glass. Use a paint remover as Mark said. Rinse thoroughly and wash with thinned denaturated alc. before applying the layup.
     
  12. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    I don't think it's the cheapest or the worst out there ,I just don't think you are paying for the name that so many companies out there do. Thanks for the heads up on the faux epoxy.
     
  13. BurnabyRocket61
    Joined: Mar 2008
    Posts: 19
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    Location: North Vancouver BC Canada

    BurnabyRocket61 Junior Member

    I'm using System Three Silver Tip laminating resin. I like it. 2 to 1 mix, no blush, fast or slow hardener, I use the slow, its tack free in about 6 hours at 20 centigrade. Application temperature is as low as 2 degrees which is great as you know up here in the great white north. I use those small foam paint brushes for tight areas, but for spreading over large areas I use a 6 to 10 cm square piece of card board, not the corrugated type, but the thinner stuff from a good Canadian beer box eh. You can also add thickeners for filleting and fairing, but check out there other products for that, including GelMagic it mixes to a butter like consistency and is great for gap filling. Although retail for the Silver Tip 6 liter kit is about $200, and similar for the other products by volume, although they come in smaller kits, I think they're worth it. Check it out at systemthree.com
     
  14. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    Well the boats off it's trailer and is finally gutted. I will be doing the transom real soon well as soon as i can get some real epoxy that is. I have to wait untill tommorrow Noahs in Toronto has a five gallon epoxy kit for $299.
     

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  15. aboyd
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: Fenwick,Ont

    aboyd Junior Member

    "Oil can" of hull

    Hello all was just reading some of the previous posts here and mark brought up the point of older glass hulls like mine taking the shape of an oil can. If this happens especially to the keel area would that not be beneficial for the over all speed of the boat. I was reading somewhere where some manufacturers actually form a J near transom to controll speed. If my hull has this pronounced J on in it's under side is this something tha can be fix when new stringers are installed. Or do u fair this out on the under side with the goo.
     
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