Deadrise on 13ft garvey style boat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Paul D, Mar 29, 2019.

  1. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
    Posts: 52
    Likes: 3, Points: 8
    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Yea would be bit more work to build to cherz
     
  2. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,159
    Likes: 120, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1082
    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    I disagree with Mr E on the notched transom. If you are going for a light weight garvey design, the wide bow provides more lift further forward than a typical pointy bowed boat, and the notched design helps with a tiller steer boat. If you are trying for a 10 -15hp boat, you don't need too much of a notch. 7-10 inches will do. This lets you put 15 degrees slope on just the notch for standard mounting and tilt clearance while letting you have square boxes on the sides for better use of materials. My preference is to use long shaft motors so I have a bit more height at the tiller, and I get a tiny bit more lift when tilted up as well. The side boxes really help if you want to set or remove a portable motor on a light boat while in the water.

    I agree with the others that 7 degrees is a practical midship deadrise. Its just enough to not make it a hassle to form a stitch and glue hull. You'll need to reinforce the keel with some heavy glass to make the whole boat rigid.

    If you go with a straight transom, plan on using a quality tiller extension to get the weight centered. A 14 foot boat works quite a bit better than a 13 foot boat in this style. The second person can be closer to the middle of the boat when cruising up the river and doesn't change the trim as much.
     

  3. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
    Posts: 52
    Likes: 3, Points: 8
    Location: New Zealand

    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks Phill ...is something like the transom of the tango skiff kind of what u mean?with the angle of the inside of the notch?
    Screenshot_20190331-102158_Samsung Internet.jpg
     
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