Day/weekender with wet deck?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by kroberts, May 21, 2012.

  1. kroberts
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: Chicago area

    kroberts Senior Member

    Hi,

    Awhile back I introduced myself on this forum, did some research and then life hit me.

    Now I'm still interested but my life situation has changed a bit.

    Originally, I was recommended a PaperJet 14, Alexa's Rocket AR15, CoreSound 17 among others. I was after something I could learn to sail on and still convert to get some serious speed, so that I could use one boat for basic handling training without killing myself. So a PJ14 was my focus.

    So now my situation has changed a bit. I have a girlfriend who is likely to be a permanent part of my household, and a Rottweiler who loves the water.

    So while I was mostly interested in a single-hander before, now I'm interested in something that can take 2-4 adults and a dog or two, still fit on a trailer and be able to take to a remote beach and camp on it. And I'm talking "real" adults too, I weigh 250 lbs (usa) and the women likely to go on are 150 or so. I'm 6'4".

    Looking at pictures, I was fascinated by the wet deck on an AR15 picture. That was obviously a competition boat, but my limited experience in an actual sailboat, I spent a lot of time bailing one day when the chop was a bit up. I couldn't help but wonder if it would be easier to swim out of a boat with a wet deck, and if there's some sort of disadvantage to it other than having your stuff wash out of the boat? It seems to me that you'd want to tie your stuff in anyway, right? waterproof bags and such?

    Right now I'm interested in things like a CoreSound 20 or similar, and looking for recommendations. I'm looking for a light, strong and relatively fast but still forgiving wooden hull that can look like a wooden boat. I could definitely see getting into a competition every now and then.
     
  2. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    Sounds like you are looking at the right kind of boats. You might want to take a look at the i550 as well. It has a retractable bulb keel - and a little cuddy cabin. The added stability of the bulb makes it a lot easier to sail without people spending a lot of time in the water - and the cuddy cabin can easily hide a porta-potty - which is an essential accessory if you wish to sail with ladies (word choice intentional).

    The i550 and the Core Sound series are easily built and fit your requirements quite well.

    --
    CutOnce
     
  3. kroberts
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 318
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 210
    Location: Chicago area

    kroberts Senior Member

    Hmmm. Hadn't thought of that requirement. Frankly the only time I've ever been out on the water and had anyone "feel the need" we would just hook our feet into the strap, both hike out over the side on opposite directions and "take care of business." Minor business rather than major if you take my meaning....

    A couple couples aboard and a possible overnight kinda make that arrangement a bit strained.

    The i550 is a wood boat? I was kinda hoping for something that could do without paint. Maybe glass/epoxy/wood composite with UV blockers, although I know the CS series is plywood.

    If I had my "druthers" I'd pick something that looks like an International Swift Solo. Admittedly that thing is entirely out of my pay grade to even breathe on it, but I like artfully built wood products.

    Aside of the head, I would prefer to keep it all simple. The i550 is a nice looking boat, but a cabin seems a bit extreme for some reason.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The Swift Solo was built from other materials initially, but wood tolerated repeated flex better, so rather then having to replace a competitive sailor after a couple of seasons, WRC was selected, as you could keep hull shape longer (more seasons of hard racing), before replacement.

    Open transom boats are only good for one thing and aren't especially conducive to camp cruising. Considering your sailing skills, you shouldn't be thinking about a preformance sailor so much as a forgiving sailor with some preformance potential. The CS series would be best described as a raid boat. It has some preformance potential, but is also stable and forgiving, partly because the rig will not let you get too crazy. The SC 20 is a big boat to handle as novice sailors, the 17 is a better choice in this regard, with room for you, the better half and a pooch or two.
     
  5. kroberts
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 318
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 210
    Location: Chicago area

    kroberts Senior Member

    PAR,

    Nice to see you're still around and still answering questions from landlubbers. You originally pointed me at the CS17. I've done some of your recommended reading too, so I'm not quite the unlettered peasant I was last time we talked. I didn't soak in all the engineering details of the Lord's method but I now have the basics.

    The Swift Solo was referenced not because I thought to get into it, but rather as a style of building that I think is strong, durable and beautiful. I like the wood strips with a glass skin (Not using carbon, too expensive for my budget!) as a composite since it lets you build something that actually looks like wood and still gets good strength. To me the Swift Solo is like a Ferrari, something to be appreciated from a distance.

    The Paper Jet 14 was attractive at first because one boat could be rigged 3 ways, going from novice to semi-advanced. I figured at the time to go from novice to "ready for a real boat" without having to buy several different boats.

    I'm just interested in what you said, a simple, forgiving boat with potential for speed and no seriously bad characteristics. I don't want a slow boat, I don't really want to sit there bobbing up and down in a tub when the wind slows down a bit. The wet deck idea was mostly because of that one day I spent more time bailing than sailing, and that's no fun at all. :)
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Scuppers Ken, scuppers. Even a swamped boat, once sailing again can drain off it's unwanted wet bulk, without cutting open the transom.

    The Paper Jet is too small for your needs. I think you'll find it difficult to get a design that preforms as well as plays host for a crew of four (12 legs). A raid boat is probably what you want. They're designed to handle a load, but can offer some preformance potential, if relieved of some of it's burden.
     

  7. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

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