Cutting core cell

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by catsketcher, May 6, 2017.

  1. catsketcher
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Hello all
    I have half a sheet of 40mm corecell I want to cut into 20mm thick pieces. Has anyone done anything like this? I have an idea of using a hand saw and some 20mm guides on the table but is there a good way someone has done this?

    cheers

    Phil
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You mean "split" it into two sheets half as thick ? I doubt that could be done manually without turning the air blue with cursing, and still fail.
     
  3. abourgault
    Joined: Jul 2014
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    abourgault Junior Member

    The best way I can see would be using a hot wire with a guide on each side of the sheet. The sheet would have to be backed by a plywood sheet to remain flat in each direction to work. I've not try that though.
     
  4. jorgepease
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    Band Saw would be the way to go, that's what they use when they cut it from huge blocks. If it's a full sheet find somebody with one of the big saws, I used to have the name of one of the guys that makes them here in Florida, will check if I still have it, you might be able to google it though.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I would have guessed a vertical guillotine-knife arrangement, that would not involve losses of thickness each cut, but band saw it may well be.
     
  6. Beamreach
    Joined: Oct 2016
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    Beamreach Junior Member

    Agree ,Band Saw with thick re-saw blade if the pieces will fit and you set up for re-sawing.Try re-sawing a similar test piece of soft wood
     
  7. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    messabout Senior Member

    Slitting a piece such as that is best done on a horizontal band saw. The firms that cut foam plastic and other padding or packaging material, start with what they call a bun. It is a big chunk of foam similar to a loaf of bread but the dimensions are often 8 feet by 4 x 4 feet. From the bun they slice whatever thickness they want. The machines that do that usually have the saw move along the horizontal surface while the bun is held in a fixed position. Vertical band saws, often without teeth on the blade, make the smaller shapes from the previously slit foam. The hotizontal saw may also be toothless depending on the composition of the foam.

    You might track down one of the foam suppliers and persuade them to slit your foam.....or just buy 20 mm thickness and use you 40 mm stuff for some other application. You just might do your job with a hand saw if the thickness variation is not a critical matter. That kinda' depends on how large the piece to be slit is.
     
  8. catsketcher
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Thanks for the advice. I will check it out
     
  9. rob denney
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    rob denney Senior Member

    Cut 20mm thick pieces off the sides of the big piece, then spot hot melt glue them together. Should be able to use a thinner blade so less wastage and a more accurate cut. Use a hot melt gun with a long nozzle so you can get glue in the join without separating the pieces of foam.
     

  10. UNCIVILIZED
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    UNCIVILIZED DIY Junkyard MadScientist

    Using a hot wire to cut a lot of the foams out there tends to make some pretty toxic gasses, in addition to having the potential to damage the foam due to melting from the wire. Thus leaving you with a surface that you can't much bond to (at least without sanding off the melted layer/bits, & any of the foam which was molecularly damaged by the heat). Or so goes the theory. Talk to corecell & ask'em.
     
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