cutting a ship up

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by peter radclyffe, Jan 3, 2021.

  1. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

  2. Charlyipad
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    Charlyipad Senior Member

    This is where I live and charter. There is still the question of how they managed to improperly load a RO-RO. Anyone know the specifics of how all the traffic is tracked when these ships are loaded? All I have heard is that there is a computer somewhere in the ship. The hearings so far have not produced any kind of real answer.
     
  3. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    From a report on the hearing about the Golden Ray capsize. Bolding added. Analysis points to faulty loading, low ballast in Golden Ray rollover - Professional Mariner https://www.professionalmariner.com/analysis-points-to-faulty-loading-low-ballast-in-golden-ray-rollover/
     
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  4. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    says using anchor chain to cut the ship. Like a regular chain with rather rounded links or is there something they aren't telling us. I'd think just a regular big chain with big rounded links would tend to mostly ride over steel rather nicely and do very little cutting for the energy expanded. Sure maybe the (whatever its called where the anchor chain flies through when dropping an anchor) shute is wear resistant steel compared to regular ship hull, but still. I'd have figured it would be a steel cable with abrasive nobs, or a big cutting/shredding wheel mounted on a big excavator.
     
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  5. Charlyipad
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    Charlyipad Senior Member

    It is a big *** chain. Each link weighs 80lbs, and it makes a jagged cut if you look at it up close. Like a saw with big teeth I guess. They just cut through the second section Sunday and lifted it onto a barge for transport to Louisiana. Photo here; St. Simons Sound Incident Response Update: Responders remove Section Eight of the Golden Ray wreck https://www.stsimonssoundincidentresponse.com/so/55NRJsrF9?languageTag=en&cid=31927a22-2ac7-4960-920b-3d49cb13ebe4&fbclid=IwAR1lnGjfh44reY6cUXQsz1RnGQoSycafc3iKOCLA5EV6m1D1aCb4_HL7QKo#/main
     
  6. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    It's obvious why a wheel wouldn't work when you think about it: any such machine has a limited depth of cut.

    I'd never heard of doing anything like this before reading this post, but it makes perfect sense. The only part that mystifies me is how they got the chain strung under the hull to begin the procedure.
     
  7. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I was thinking make two cuts about 20ft apart, and a cross-cut, then pull that section down to next deck level, repeat with two more cuts 1-2' inside first two, repeat. Lots of steps but more 'surgical'.

    Anyone got video of actual cutting with anchor chain? What speed of chain? How much sparks flying? What does it SOUND like? :)
     
  8. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Have a look the Random Picture Thread, Squidly just a few posts back from the end - early Dec. There's more material including video with sound.
     
  9. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    It's very slow and clunky!
     
  10. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    bummer. I was hoping for something like a Godzilla roar, powered by anchor chains biting metal at near freefall speed. :(
     
  11. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I suspect that small cutting devices are used to start a hole. Then the chain can snag an edge and rip/tear the rest of the way through.
    Since it won't be re-asembled, no need for surgical precision. Simply get it done quickly and cheaply.
     
  12. Charlyipad
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    Charlyipad Senior Member

    they used a horizontal boring machine with a messenger to get the chain underneath. All the cutting chains are already in place now, all they have to do is move the barge into place and hook her up. The stop every so often and cut out a few chain links to shorten up as the chain slices through the ship. they are about to start the third cut now.
     
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  13. Charlyipad
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    Charlyipad Senior Member

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