Custom 19' all weather, minimalist, strip plank composite 'go fast'

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by socalspearit, Sep 2, 2021.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    So, build it. The disappointments won't be mine. Gonna rock a lot at sea as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2021
  2. fpjeepy05
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    fpjeepy05 Senior Member

    I just saw this topic. I haven't had time to read through it all. But I will. I have an 18ft Saturn k-boat knockoff and have similar experiences as you. I also have had similar experiences on this forum (as well as others.) Everyone is going to tell you that you need to make it wider, because that's what they have. "It's worth a couple extra dollars in fuel to gain comfort and safety" "You're stupid trying to save money" "You're gonna kill someone" I'll DM you some other posts that you can read through with the same kinda information.

    But I support you. I'll be the only one. Do it. We live in America where these boats aren't common, but in other parts of the world long narrow boats are common because they are more practical.

    Here is a little inspiration for you.
     
  3. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Brilliant! I didn't watch the whole video, but the first few boats all appeared to be powered by elderly British Seagull outboard motors.
    I am sure that their owners have a love / hate relationship with them.

    However what they are doing is far removed really from what Socal is planning on doing with his boat.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I sense you never joined the British Seagull cult, bajansailor ? :)
     
  5. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Sadly no - I was of the wrong mindset I think.
    We still have one lurking in the cellar down stairs - I keep it in the vain hope that somebody (who does not know any better) might want to be frustrated mightily with it, thinking it is a 'bargain' if they can get it for free.
    Heck, I would even pay them to take it if they promise me that they will document all their adventures with the beast on Youtube.

    Although I remember when they were fitted with automatic recoil starters - what luxury! Previously you had to wind the rope around the flywheel for each start, tug it mightily, and hope that the knot on the end doesn't knock out the front teeth of your passengers (who have been lured on board with the promise of a nice little fishing cruise) sitting further forward.
     
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  6. fpjeepy05
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    fpjeepy05 Senior Member

    I understand it is not the same, but they are long narrow boats being pushed with little hp through a little chop. The drivers have to remain seated because the boats are too tippy to stand up. Socal wants to make something a little bigger and a little more specialized, but I think they have similarities.
     
  7. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Yes. They don't board them from the side. The only problem I have with the sor is that it is only narrow to allow for a barrel barge in the slip and that it will have wet scuppers which most everyone hates rather quickly when seawater homes inboard. And if you were going to make a narrow boat for boarding from the side; it'd be done differently than a vee hull.
     
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  8. socalspearit
    Joined: Apr 2021
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    socalspearit Junior Member

    Those are awesome :) When I traveled as a teenager throughout southeast Asia I remember many of the wooden water taxis--long and narrow with giant tiller extensions to allow the pilot to stand in the center of the boat.

    The barrel barge is part of it but what nobody every understands is that I LIKE the way my long hull handles in these waters. Of boats in the 15' - 20' range, besides my own I've of course spent many hundreds of hours on a various center consoles, RIBs, and 'proper' fishing boats. The inflatable has huge disadvantages due to the fact that it's an inflatable--but I love the hull design for what I do. Anyone who has spent time diving with me on vessel gets it quickly but a lot of the local divers can never understand why I often turn down offers to go out on their 'proper' little boats in favor of my own. It's so fun to run, absolutely kills it any type of following sea, and has a nicer ride quality and handling than most of the beamy fishing center consoles when we have weather. And that's leaving aside the very obvious speed and fuel efficiency factors.

    As for seawater in the boat, I would most heartily agree--most everyone hates it when seawater inboards, UNLESS they're freedivers/surfers/swimmers head to toe in a quality wetsuit who view the vessel as nothing more than an engine platform to get them to the next patch of nice seawater that they can't wait to jump into. Underway the planing action of the boat lifts the deck and there's no standing water. On my inflatable I never bothered to fix the rear scupper, it was so much nicer to have the deck flush after everyone's in since it washes any fish blood/smutz, shellfish debris, and wetsuit juice immediately out the scupper. If the open scupper is ever a problem I could just add drain socks.

    ----
    I am finalizing my CAD model and waiting on a delivery of MDF to recut the section forms...
     
  9. cracked_ribs
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    cracked_ribs Senior Member

    Yeah I think there's just a fundamental difference between what you want out of the boat and what most people think you should want. Classic internet:
    "I like this boat I have and I'd like a longer version with a rigid hull and no inflation."
    "Do a Statement of Requirements and don't just pick a boat you think is good!"
    "Okay, I want the handling characteristics of a very long, low, narrow hull for this super specific application that I have lots of experience with."
    "Your requirements are wrong, just pick a boat I think is good!"

    You have lots of experience with a really narrow boat with low gunwales, doing exactly what you propose. You are planning to build a longer, wider boat than the one you have? I'm not sure why everyone thinks they know your needs better than you do. It will definitely have handling quirks but that's life. Yes, it'll be tippier than a fat boat. Sounds like you know that. Yes, it'll be wetter than a typical boat. Sounds like you know that too. Okay, off to the races.

    Post build pics. Totally interested to see this one get done. I've had all kinds of people tell me I'd be better off with off-the-shelf ABC, and frequently I've started from scratch and gone for XYZ and I can't think of a single time I've regretted it. Usually the people giving advice just didn't understand my priorities.
     
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  10. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    our main issue has been the difference between a rib and a vee

    most plywood boats do not tolerate constant immersion either

    there are more problems here than beam

    the OP has not even considered changing the deadrise or to a tunnel hull; both changes would offer a boat that wasn't 'tippy'

    sometimes people come on here dead set to build something a certain way, expecting others to throw holy water on the idea; they take zero criticism, zero input

    if you realize the fact that none of the naval architects on the forum posted here; that ought to tell you something as well

    even your videos are not go fast boats; do you know why? It ain't a horsepower shortage.
     
  11. cracked_ribs
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    cracked_ribs Senior Member

    moderate deadrise with generous chine flats...can always increase the size of the chines after the fact and get more initial stability if he has to

    not necessarily a huge difference between a rib and a V hull and particularly in the case of his rib which has pretty unusual proportions

    he's not concerned about the tippiness and he's got experience in narrow boats doing exactly what he's talking about doing with this one

    those videos do not feature go fast boats...because they are in a racing class with a specific motor requirement

    anyway he's building it so one of you will get to say "i told you so" eventually
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If you think slender boats are safe offshore, you are kidding yourself, humans worked that out, and that outriggers can help, millennia ago, but slim vessels with the proportions of a freighter canoe, being legal to ply for hire as an offshore dive boat, beggars belief.
     
  13. fpjeepy05
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    fpjeepy05 Senior Member

    I'm not sure what you are trying to say, but slender boats are still used all around the world, with or without outriggers. And any boat is legal for a 6-pack charter. Uninspected vessel. That's the point. Have you ever run a dive charter business? Socal has, but you know better than him right?
     
  14. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    A genuine question - is this absolutely true?
    Are there no standards whatsoever in place in the USA regarding general condition of and safety equipment carried by '6 pack' charter boats?
     

  15. fpjeepy05
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    fpjeepy05 Senior Member

    High-paid nav archs don't come here, because there is no point. They get lots of money to design boats. Charity cases for backyard builders aren't really their thing.

    Criticism can be helpful. Telling someone they need something that they don't when you have no experience with it and your reasoning is because no one else that you know does it. That's just being negative. Getting butt-hurt because they don't listen to your advice is childish.
     
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