CSC 30 Catamaran- the coastal passage

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by peterchech, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

  2. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

  3. ecojet
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    ecojet Junior Member

    The hybrid power cat will only really be viable once battery technology improves. There are some good electric motors out there and solar panels are improving all the time and cheap, it's the energy storage issue that needs to improve.
    I built the model so I could experience the process of building a cat to better understand it and to see if I would be able to take on a full size build.
    Now having done that I am designing a smaller cat 24ft ( twin 25hp outboards ) to suit what I would want now, the bigger cat would be better once I have the time to use it when I retire maybe.
     
  4. ecojet
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    ecojet Junior Member

    Here are some more pics of the model, Gus7119.
     

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  5. silvah
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    silvah Junior Member

    I started looking at the plans for the CSC 30 as we well, and although most of the plans are fairly straight forward, the sheet "MAIN PANELS" in the plan lists the length of the 4 joined plywood sheets as 9000mm. Doesn't 4 panels of plywood come out to 9600mm if they are butt joined, or just slightly less if they are scarfed?

    With that 9000mm number wouldn't this be closer to 28 feet once these pieces are wrapped around the bulkheads? Is one of the plywood sheets supposed to get a couple feet cut off?

    I must be missing something. Hopefully someone else can clear it up.

    Thanks!
     
  6. ecojet
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    ecojet Junior Member

    I would change the 2000mm section 2600mm.
     
  7. silvah
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    silvah Junior Member

    I agree, that would seem to be the most logical thing to do.

    It seems like all the measurements on the plans are a bit off. After my previous post I noticed that the "Main Bulkhead" sheet is also incorrect. It lists the measurement from the lower 800mm chine to chine line to the 1200mm line across the upper widest point of the hull as being 1200mm. But if the distance between those two lines is 1200mm, then the line making the actual angle of the hull is going to be greater than 1200mm, and the plywood is not going to be wide enough to fill that gap!

    I think maybe that the plans weren't just written on a case of beer, but written while finishing that case of beer :D

    Lots of good stuff here though. The construction method is intriguing, essentially a twist on stitch and glue.
     
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    -
    I've posted the below info on Jason's "Waller 1200 or Easy Sarah?" thread in post #31.

    Thought it might be handy on this CSC 30 subject thread to have the links here together too . . :cool:

    BTW, I was thinking while gathering the links, and somehow missed this thread till now, ± € 15 K (realistic ?) + 900 hours (realistic ?), that's just 2 months of work for 2 persons full time . . :idea: - Please hold your fire :eek:, I have to go through this thread first, and maybe I'll find some answers already . . :cool:

    Good Luck To You All . . :)
     
  9. silvah
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    silvah Junior Member

    Looking at this plan, I think in terms of hours, yes it is doable if you have some good woodworking skills and stick to a basic interior.

    In terms of cost, that is going to depend. I think it is possible if you source a used rig, motor, and some other hardware. The cost goes into fitting out the hulls, if you leave things basic you could hit that number. So much of the cost is in the fit out to provide the comforts of home, but if you don't need all that it makes a cheap way to get out on the water.

    It really comes down to this in my opinion: If you can find a suitable rig, you can make the hulls sail. The costs come in electrical systems, water systems, galley fit out, level of interior finish, electronics, etc. Are those things necessary? No, but most of us want them anyway. And I doubt that $21K number includes much of anything in those areas.
     
  10. UpOnStands
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    UpOnStands Senior Member

    question for the community
    if the plywood is cut exactly following the dimensions indicated by the computer (all dotted lines in the first image), would the final result look anything like the rendered hull?
    the frames are not carefully placed at this point and the cabin top is still lost in mystery. LOA is 34 feet.
     

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  11. limecc
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    limecc New Member

    I read this entire thread very carefully and must congratulate and thank all the contributors. What a wealth of experience and information!

    I am planning a retirement project to build a custom CSC 30 and have a little over ten years to work out the finer details. I would describe myself as a complete sailing novice but have comprehensive engineering and woodworking skills, it would be a breeze to do. Actually sailing doesn't float my boat, I'd want a pair of 30hp outboards on the back.

    With the above in mind I guess the hulls would need extra length and buoyancy at the transom, and to carry extra weight of a better bridgedeck they probably need to be wider than 1.2m, would joining two sheets of ply be a weak point on the main bulkheads? Would it be able to reach planing speed and what would that be?

    I like the look of a Waller Coral Cove 31 and am considering that but as-is the design would need tweaking to accept the outboards.

    If I go for the CSC I would join the bridgedeck along the length of the hull. I thought I had most things worked out and now realise I haven't even scratched the surface! Thanks to this thread I definitely ruled out Polyester because of the smell and balsa. It's also galvanized my determination to realise the Cat dream and see the project through. Congrats to Gus and everyone else with the courage and conviction to build Leon's design.
     
  12. ecojet
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    ecojet Junior Member

    Build it as a displacement cat, no need for it to plane, you would need a lot more hp for it to plane.
    If you look at my model you will see the hulls have no rocker to them and are the same dimension all the way back to the transom from the main forward bulkhead, very different from a sailing cat.
    Scarf or butt joints are normally used for the plywood sheets
    Here's one set up as a power cat.
     

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  13. silvah
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    silvah Junior Member

    I think you would get exactly what you rendered, however I think you might find that the flat bottom will cause issues with pounding in your design. I agree with ecojet, build it as a displacement hull, it is a proven design.

    I have another thread going referencing a similar design called a Planecat. If flat bottoms were a great design, it would be in more designs, but they are few and far between. The advantages are that because there are less chines it is easier to build, and there is more interior room.

    Where would you plan to use this cat? Inland waters? Then maybe it would be OK.
     
  14. UpOnStands
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    UpOnStands Senior Member

    great to know
    yes, the bilge will need some more development -will use some rocker and
    a simple 1 inch ply plate as a mini keel
    takes time to ensure that the 3D curves can be successfully flattened.
     

  15. silvah
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    silvah Junior Member

    I think if you compare the width of the CSC 30's hulls to other designs that are around the same length you will find that it already has fairly wide hulls for the size. I was looking at the plans for another 34 foot sailing cat (professional design) and they were just a bit over a meter wide, so at 4 foot wide, this boat already has a ton of buoyancy, more seems unnecessary to me.

    As far as joining the hulls and the bridge deck, I would definitely do that. I have been tinkering around with a couple of designs (a 32 and 34 footer) based on the CSC 30 and would do the same. It would provide some additional rigidity, and the additional length allows the addition of a couple of full size bunks in the fore section of the bridge deck.

    This design is really a gold mine for those willing to tinker with ideas a bit.
     
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