CSC 30 Catamaran- the coastal passage

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by peterchech, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. Teleman
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    Teleman Junior Member

    If resale doesn't matter, work out how long you're likely to use the boat.
    If it's no more than 5-8 years, build it out of the cheapest exterior ply.
    You'll save enough money to pay for a new 9.9 Yammy.

    Incidentally, Leon (the designer/builder) reckons CSC stands for "Cheap S**t Cat"!
     
  2. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    I'm going to go out on a limb here and say resale always matters. There are a multitude of reasons to need to sell which are always going be beyond our control.
     
  3. Gus7119
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    Gus7119 Senior Member

    Yeah resale not in equation. Have helped boat builder build one when the plans came out. Itd done one circumnavigation and been sailing in Asia for 5 years, but had full bridge deck cabin. As designed by owner with rear births 1500mm not 1200mm, they extended under the cockpit seats full queen size. Plus boxed beams and it sailed beautifully and sat right on her lines. After the build I was lucky enough to spend a week sailing her and she was fast took to rough seas well and was very comfortable. I just wish I had their contact details because the boat builder, top bloke he was, died so lost any conact or updates on the boat after that. But Ive mentioned this before. Plus much more goes into the build then the simple outline. I think people look at it and think thats it. A few designers who arent trying to sell anything feel with boxedbeams and either dagger or mini keels its really not a bad boat.
    After studying many many plans and the full sets I managed to collect his dimentions actually work really well. And being bare bones give the builder, if they know what their doing scope to make a really efficient cruiser.
    Dont know about what Leon reckons Id heard he called it that cause it was short for costal sailing catamaran (sorry have to learn to read posts b4 i post them). The one in the mag was not the only one he built theres a number of them out there, so unless he told you that Id be a septic on thaT one.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2016
  4. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    Gus, IMHO, stick with the original design and concept for a cheap quick build, the full bridge deck version, again my humble opinion looks like it would be blown across the ocean like a beachball, far too much windage. As you said the original concept is proven.
     
  5. Teleman
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    Teleman Junior Member

    There's a full bridgedeck CSC ( in Queensland) done as a motorboat with twin outboards.
    Looked like a nice boat.

    For a sailing version, I agree with redreuben on the windage issue.
     
  6. Gus7119
    Joined: Dec 2015
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    Gus7119 Senior Member

    Cheers mate. Ive taken some measurements from some cats on Pittwater, gorilla style. As theres a heap of boats that are rearly used so finding owners to ask is difficult. Anyway if the saloon starts at 1900mm (just over 6ft) from bridge deck reducing to 1550mm (5ft2inc) at mast beam then it sits really well with the 5 I measured. Now i only know that 1 was a seawind. As Im coming from a mono background unfortunately dont know the makes of the others.that means the front of the saloon will be max 1500mm and at the bow 1000mm max above side of hulls. Given that this is actually on the low side of the measurements I took if the windage is that bad on that config then alot of cats must have the same problems.

    But as Ive always said from the very start if I am missing something then its better to know know. The good thing is I have time to modify if its discovered it'll be a huge mistake to go with bridge deck as I wont getcto that for a while. But initially from compression it doesnt seem to bad. But there doesnt seem to be anywhere with information on what the average saloon height is above hills, now this information would be really useful if anyone can point me in that direction.
    Always happy to have my mind changed, which it has been by the input of many users here.
    Cheers
     
  7. cookiesa
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    cookiesa Senior Member

    Unfortunately the height above thehulls is meaningless,different designs have different deck/cabin arrangements.

    You would be better comparing heights above the waterline. Then compare that to the more successful designs
     
  8. Gus7119
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    Gus7119 Senior Member

    Sorry was talking from bottom of hull. I know the average waterline height using a table made from 5 or six degners is 700mm to 900mm above WL.
    But its neither here nor there as going for what feels right once hulls finished as going for open deck so can use while I build bridge deck and saloon. It'll give me a fair idea of what will work with the final design as its a work in progress.
     
  9. cookiesa
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    cookiesa Senior Member

    Waterline to cabin top is going to give you a better idea of windage
     
  10. Gus7119
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    Gus7119 Senior Member

    Yep you're right I must have been drunk writing that post.
    So WL to floor or soul of deck hopefully 800 to 900mm. From above top of cabins on hull the roof will sit at a max of 1500mm. I think from the last measurements we took we figured wed get it down to 1100 to 1200mm above the cabin tops on hulls. I know from groppers experiences and hos pointers that a complezx curve will give it more strength so that height is at the highest point in the curve.

    Hope that makes more sense.
     
  11. cookiesa
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    cookiesa Senior Member

    So you are planning on around 2400mm above the water, in total?

    30ft cat?

    Approx 9m beam?

    It would be worth having a think about where you intend to keep it and looking at berthing costs as well. You may find reducing one of these slightly can make a large difference to the cost
     
  12. ecojet
    Joined: Jan 2017
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    ecojet Junior Member

    Hi, first post here.

    After reading this thread and others especially Gropers cat build thread, I decided to try and design a 35ft power cat based on the CSC plans with some modifications. I designed it as a hybrid diesel/electric cat, hence the large cabin roof to hold all the solar panels.

    I built a 1:10th scale model with little jet drives and remote control.
    It goes surprisingly well with the tiny jet drives.

    Here are a couple of picks, it's a little rough but served it's purpose and now I am starting to design a 24ft power cat as a outboard powered weekender coastal cruiser which I may build in the future.
     

    Attached Files:

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  13. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    Nice model :)
     
  14. Gus7119
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    Gus7119 Senior Member

    That looks cool to me. Grooper seems to be the man from recall he may have built 2 could be wrong but he's got the practical experience and is very approachable.
    We finally finished all the bulkheads and have most of the boat cut out. Now comes the mammoth task of putting the puzzle together. Have done it with boat buIlderton but doing it yourself is a dirt matter. Fun but boy the time it takes is huge.
    Im thinking of using old prius motors with I prius battery tray for both as you hope not to motor much on a sail boat. And with the new solar cells that should be out this year they should provide enough power for the engines and house power during daylight with plenty of storage for the dark times. Will one hopes. Do like you design got any photos of model and any dimensions?
    Enjoy research and one thing that I took on board is that cats a fairly forgiving so as long as you follow some basic logical design rules it should be set.
     

  15. ecojet
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    ecojet Junior Member

    It ended up being 10.36m length with a 5.2m beam.

    The main bulkheads were widened from 1200 to 1600, 800 to 1200 and 400 to 800 at the bottom, as it's a power cat I made the bottom wider to help reduce squating at the rear.

    Are you going to have a build thread on here?
     
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