cruise ship/ocean liner hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by pancho_es_cool, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. pancho_es_cool
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    pancho_es_cool Junior Member

    Hi. Im designing a hull of a small cruise ship and it's designed to look like an early 20th century british liner. Although its highly unlikely, I hope i can get it built sometime in the future.

    I'm using freeShip! plus

    Have a look at it and tell me what you think!!!! :) I also included the linesplan and design hydrostatics if anyone is interested

    Edit: Added modified linesplan and better picture of original linesplan
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 12, 2011
  2. Perm Stress
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    Perm Stress Senior Member

    Did you search trough books about ships of the era?
    They should contain lines plans to start from and and to compare anew design to, for sure.
    As to hull presented, S-shaped frames forward are not at all typical for the early 29th century ships, as I know.
     
  3. pancho_es_cool
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    pancho_es_cool Junior Member

    Sadly I dont have access to many books about ships of the era. The only book i have access to is "Titanic: The ship magnificent"
    On the internet I found the bodyplan view for the RMS Lusitania and the whole linesplan for the SS United States.

    I tried to make the hull look as similar to these lines plans, but not identical. They are fairly similar. But I'm not a Marine Engineer nor a Naval Architect, so I could be doing something wrong.
     
  4. pancho_es_cool
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    pancho_es_cool Junior Member

    I did some changes to my hull to eliminate those s-shaped frames and all I can say is that I like it better than my original design. Thanks for pointing that fact out! I added the new lines plan if you want to check it out....
     
  5. RAVENNA
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    RAVENNA Junior Member

    What legth of vessel ?
     
  6. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'd say the fashion right now is sail/auxiliary steamer cruise ship.

    Think about a replica of what ships were like before they lost ALL the sails.
     
  7. pancho_es_cool
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    pancho_es_cool Junior Member

    The length is 542.5 ft or 165.354 meters. Neither too big or too small.


    Sail boats with auxiliary steam propulsion are neat. I'm thinking of starting a small sail/auxiliary steamer cruise ship line and then, if everything goes well, I might build this ship.
     
  8. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

    You mean build a scale model right?

    You can't seriously think that you could design a working 150m ship based on visual cues picked from one book.

    Ever designed a dinghy?
     
  9. pancho_es_cool
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    pancho_es_cool Junior Member

    No scale model. Full size, working ship it is.

    I am fully aware that one can not design a 150m ship using cues from one book. It takes a lot of resources, knowledge and experience. This is a long term project which will evolve as time goes on. This is not the final version of the hull, I can assure.
     

  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Not really, simply put it takes certification, which you are a long way from attaining, though the picture is pretty. Generally it takes a team of engineers and NA's to design a ship of this class. The styling clues are a frivolous bow to the owners, having little to do with the project, from a man hour stand point.
     
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