Cross Indian ocean in 4 meters dinghy sailboat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Nauticals, Mar 4, 2018.

  1. Nauticals
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    Nauticals Junior Member

    For long time now i have thoughts on building a small plywood epoxy dinghy-like sailboat about 4 meters and cross the indian ocean from Singapore or Malaysia to Mauritius.

    I would like your advice for topics vary from building with plywood methods & strength, gear, navigation, self-steering system for small boats, and even best possible route and time of the year to do that.

    I have already done my research and keep searching more information, im looking this forum for sometime now and whats best than asking other people to share knowledge and advice.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    First question: How much sailing experience do you have?
     
  3. Nauticals
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    Nauticals Junior Member

    I have zero "sailing" experience and here this forum kicks in. However have with small motorized boats and much with kayaks. I am aware of the near to shore dangers, but that's it, i haven't been far off-shore beside with ferry lines.
     
  4. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

    And would you seriously consider the advice given by the professionals with relevant experience (I am not one of them)? Would you take the advice to your heart - even if the advise was that you are comung to this from the wrong direction and tha your plan by key criteria is really bad?
     
  5. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    A four meter boat is not well suited to travel any body of water as mean and unpredictable as the Indian ocean. That ocean has no conscience, It will kill you without remorse. That same ocean or any of its kind is not the place for an inexperienced sailor, navigator, survivalist.
     
  6. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    My advice is to start sailing and build up experience, and make plans that are within your ever growing skills and know-how.

    P.S. - Or at least don't execute any plans before they are within your own skills and know-how.
     
  8. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member


    Looks like the boat made it.
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Last edited: Mar 4, 2018
  10. Nauticals
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    Nauticals Junior Member

    @kerosene Yes of course, i ll consider very seriously every advice, idea or opinion will be given by professionals and people with experience.

    Indeed four meter boat is not suitable for a crossing. However the four meter boat im thinking of, will have almost all the features of a larger size sailboat. It will be a very compact design, the only place to enter water will be the hatch. The boat will have a sliding keel with a bulb on the bottom, many sealed compartments with air, thinking outriggers for more stability yet thinking if they gonna break in a long trip due the pressure, and the boat will be self-righting.

    I believe that using the sails to sail is not a rocket science, it is something that can be learn easy and fast, but what i find important is the experience. Because maybe yes you can sail a boat and use the sails, but what it is important is to have the experience on what to do when weather change, or there is change in waves or rain, then there where experience is very important, to know what to do and how to act fast.

    Of course before i set sail for any such trip i will take a proper training first and i ll get every piece of advice and information, but even still, it is different getting an advice from actually living that experience so you can say that you really understood what to do in such situation. Well hopefully i can meet an old salt along the way that willing to show me few things.

    @Angélique Thank you for making me aware of such events and the pre-cautions needed. In the other hand there are far more people made it in that kind of size boats in a cross Atlantic. As example Big Book of Sailing by Frank Grube and Gerhard Richter, Nowadays there are people that crossing Atlantic in rowboats.
     
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    None of the ones you named did it successfully without a proper set of skills + knowledge + own experiences on smaller trips, which they'd built up in length.

    So start sailing and learn to know the ocean from theory, and from your own experiences there.

    Meanwhile pick a design and start building, that's if you're confident while being out there on the ocean every now and then, and on for ever longer trips.

    From the many designers available, below four examples from Paul Fisher's portfolio, where the skipper is the biggest risk for failure on your proposed venture.

    18' 6" Ocean Crossing Kayak - L = 18' 6" = 5.64 m- (Note: all in all this is by far the smallest of these four boats)

    [​IMG]

    Micro 8 Mini Yacht - L = 8' = 2.44 m

    [​IMG]

    Micro 10 Mini Yacht - L = 10' = 3.05 m

    [​IMG]

    4 m Mini Yacht - L = 13' 1½" = 4.00m

    ( P.S. - Note: guidance for use of the 4 m Mini Yacht is only; Inland, Estuary and Coastal = No Ocean Crossing. )

    [​IMG]

    For the latter there are also plans for a scale model, which is always a good thing to build first.

    4 m Mini Model Yacht

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] - [​IMG]

    God speed !
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2018
  12. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Ocean rower Ralph Tuijn would be a good candidate to inform you if he's available, or at least you could study every piece of info that's on the web about him, and his journeys.

    Good luck !
     
  13. portacruise
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    portacruise Senior Member

  14. Nauticals
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    Nauticals Junior Member

    All these are very interesting information, looking at.

    Planning to start building soon and test the boat along the way before any cross ocean trip.

    What it is bothering me the most is the way of construction, especially hull thickness. I have build structures before, but i had never build a boat or use epoxy. A serious worry for me is, what if epoxy and fiber glass failed and the boat break apart in the middle of the ocean. I will be glad to know such information. Can waves break a plywood epoxy boat?

    Also im wondering. what can go wrong in the middle of the ocean? I have lots of things in mind, but by question this, it will help to eliminate any issues will occur and the way the boat will be designed.

    Another consideration i have, technically four meters boats is not that sustainable for an ocean crossing, but 5,5 meters surely can do. This is from a technical point and from my understanding.

    Ralph Tuijn is a great ocean rower, i might could meet him in a time later on when i get some in practice sailing and if he's having that time too.
     

  15. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)






    and more . . .
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2018
    kerosene likes this.
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