Critique my design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by RagnarTheDane, Dec 20, 2016.

  1. RagnarTheDane
    Joined: Jul 2016
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    Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Texas

    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

    Hello all.
    I'm brand new to boat building (been reading and learning.)
    But I'm not at wood working.

    I went and looked at the boat I want, and it's 26,000.
    Now, I'm usually of the mindset of "not if I can build it"
    So for months I've been reading, looking, lurking, and planning.

    Here's what I want to accomplish:
    I want a boat that I can fish off of, cruise around the lake with the family, and hunt/duck hunt out of.

    The Lowe 18/60 Big River comes close to what I want, but not with a Mud Motor. So, here's what I'm considering, and please tell me what you think

    I want to build an 18x60 Flat Bottom Design boat out of plywood and fiber glass, built tougher than an aluminum boat, and made to last as I don't care to buy another boat.

    I am considering 1/2 Marine Ply for the bottom and 3/8 marine Ply for the sides and topside (deck, box, console, etc). And then coating the entire thing in fiberglass.

    I've gotten through the paper drawings, and have made a 1:14 scale model. (Pics below). But want to know if there are any glaring mistakes in either my design, thought process, etc.

    Here's the photos and the Materials list, Thanks for your time and advice!:

    [​IMG]
    The paper man is my size scaled to 1:14 - Complete with muffin tops :)

    [​IMG]
    The Gun boxes will be padded on top, but removable mounted to a cleat/rail for more on deck storage capacity.

    [​IMG]
    The Transom will be Double stacked to 1", and I'm contemplating utilizing Sponsons... thoughts?

    [​IMG]
    I like the open storage, but am also contemplating a drop in live well that can double as a cooler? and supports for a swivel fishing seat and cutout in the bow for a trolling motor hookup, just haven't decided.

    [​IMG]
    Right now, the bow has the traditional flat drop. I am considering doing a modified V... Thoughts?

    Here is the price list I have (with lights, extras, etc)
    [​IMG]
    I am figuring 1/2 inch for the bottom of the boat and double on transom
    3/8 Inch for everything else.
    17oz cloth with 8oz mat, and epoxy resin.
    Dual Gas Tanks in case one is damaged or runs out because I'm not paying attention. (or long day!?)

    Anywho, I greatly appreciate the advice, and hope i've not distracted you too much with my little paper man.

    Thanks again!
     
  2. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Did the model have a past life as a shoe box ? Really, at a minimum some curvature at the bow giving a smooth transition to the bottom would help.
     
  4. RagnarTheDane
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    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

    Thanks, I'll check it out.
    My reasoning for the 1/2 inch is because this will be going in flooded timber and super shallow (mud)ish water. I was hoping for a bit more strength for when I pop a stump
     
  5. RagnarTheDane
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    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

    Ha, it would appear so, but no.
    I couldn't get the balsa to bend at all so I had to cut and tape.

    I really am considering a modified V on the front for stump deflection and a little softer chop.

    Other than that?
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A vee-nosed punt with a little deadrise would be far better, how many people will be aboard ?
     
  7. RagnarTheDane
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    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

    Ok, I just looked that up, that's almost what I had in mind when I said V, only better:)
    Could be up to six (4 adults 2 children) but I would say the usual max would be me, wife, 2 kiddos.

    6 would be just cruising around. The family would be fishing. Then duck season would be me a buddy, and a crap ton of gear :)
     
  8. RagnarTheDane
    Joined: Jul 2016
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    Location: Dallas-Fort Worth Texas

    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

  9. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    Modified V and flat bottom is what i have.I have a jet outboard made for rivers but also use in still waters.The flat bottom is really stable for landing fish as Im a catch and release kinda guy.Its also easy to get to shore the shallow draft makes it easy to push away.Boats with deadrise often bottom out before you reach shore.
    Having the steering and motor at the back I dont think will work unless its just a little motor.

    I would also add a gun/fishing rod locker with a hatch.Keeps hooks out of your body and your guns clean.
     
  10. RagnarTheDane
    Joined: Jul 2016
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    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

    Yeah, when we go out now, there are times where it's questionable if it's even water. more like a mud slurry. (Currently go out in a 14/36 aluminum jon)

    The motor I'll be putting on it is a 37hp Pro-Drive Air Cooled Mud motor.
    Here's a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUlnUuXgzys

    The two 'box seats' up front are actually gun boxes (rod boxes).
    Just going to pad the tops to make them seats:)
     
  11. RagnarTheDane
    Joined: Jul 2016
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    RagnarTheDane Swabbie's Boot Shiner

    OK, so after cruising the Bateau site, I found the XF20.
    I enjoyed the design so much, that I abandoned my desire to 'design' my own, and bought the plans. (80.00 worth of relief!)

    I have to finish two more rooms in the house, but then I'll start a thread for my build!

    Thanks a TON!!
     
  12. Wayne Grabow
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    The transom should be at least 1 1/2 inches thick.
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I found the Bateau plans very well presented and the support was good too. Good luck with the build
     
  14. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    If you want the boat to last over a long period of time, then use aluminum, not ply. An essentially stump and snag proof skin of 0.125" thickness weighs1.76 pounds per square foot. 0.092 thickness weighs 1.3 lbs/ft square. The ply and glass that you have suggested will likely be heavier and way more likely to make trouble a few years later. The ply, glass, epoxy, will probably cost more too.

    Disclaimer: I am a plywood enthusiast but I am also an old timer who is somewhat in touch with reality. You can park the aluminum boat in the backyard and ignore it for five years and it will still be serviceable. Do that with a wood boat and you will probably have a hopeless mess of mildewed, saturated, rotted wood. If you are certain that it will be stored and pampered indoors, clean, and dry, then OK use wood.
     

  15. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    As far as aluminum is concerned, enthusiasts always forget the years of welding experience needed OR finding a willing, inexpensive welder to employ. That is of course IF you can find plans, and IF those plans incorporate components available in your area. All aluminiun small boats use proprietary hull side sections pressed to incorporate 'chines' to suit the design. The design and optimization of aluminium boats is complicated. Ply and epoxy is the optimum solution for the amateur builder, and if care and attention during storage is maintained then the hull will last twenty years.
     
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