Crazy Pallet Boat idea?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by dllcooper, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    There is a guy doing just what you are talking about. He is building a sharpie out of strips of wood and epoxy. he post info and picture over at the woodenboat forum. I am sure you could find info there.

    F
     
  2. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Nope. It was just the most sensible way of getting the bottom shape they wanted with traditional construction. The topsides were still planked longitudinally, as were the decks, and the bottom needed longitudinal timbers to support it.
     
  3. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    Has more to do with the fact that they were using basic cross plank technology. They started with flat bottomed sharpies that evolved into vee bottomed boat, retaining the sharpie construction, which are framed longitudinally. Hence the cross planking.

    F
     
  4. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    So what you're saying is that it was just the most sensible way of getting the bottom shape they wanted with traditional construction. Ok.
     
  5. garren
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    garren Junior Member

    What about using the pallet wood to laminate a hull? Seems shorter pieces would work for the most part.
     
  6. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    No, thats what you are saying.

    Cheers
     
  7. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    ROFL. Ok, I'm up for a pointless and amusing argument about trivia on the internet. :D

    The reason sharpies were cross-planked on the bottom was because it was the most sensible way of planking a sharpie. Sure, you can plank them longitudinally, but it doesn't gain you anything and will be more expensive. The original builders, being sensible blokes, went for the sensible option.

    When the southern builders wanted to build v-bottom craft, they again had a choice of longitudinal planking or cross planking. Using longitudinal planking would have required more expensive stock and more labour to put it on. Using cross planking (actually herringbone, in most cases) meant cheaper stock and less labour. Ergo, it was the sensible choice.

    When using non-traditional construction (plywood sheathing) all of this is irrelevant, but when using traditional construction (planked hull) it really is the most sensible way of doing it.

    Your turn. :D
     
  8. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    I agree completely.

    I guess it evolved out of expanded plank skiff construction. So yes it would be the best way to go about building one with that technology. I think it is still a good way to build if you can find the material. In the old days they used Atlantic cedar, or pine, both readily available at the time.

    F
     
  9. 1618
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    1618 New Member

    I could have sworn that I read that they went to cross-planking Chesapeake deadrises because of a shortage of long clear stuff, but I can't find where I thought I read that.

    I guess I must have made it up...
     
  10. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    I would think that most of those work boat were built as cheaply as possible, and that a long lifespan was not considered overly important. Economy of build was important. The average New Haven sharpie could be built in a few days, by 2 skilled guys. But at that time skill was sort of an expected virtue, rather than an exception.
     
  11. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Use the wood to build framing for a Skin on Frame.
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Do keep us informed of your progress.
     
  13. dllcooper
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    dllcooper Junior Member

    Thankyou - What skin would you use, sure.y the skin would be expensive to import? Also in waters which contain jagged skin tearing lava not sure I would feel hugely safe in a wooden framed boat?
     
  14. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Does your island have goats?

    Try not to run aground on rough surfaces. Keep flotation chambers so you won't sink if holed.
     

  15. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Ballistic nylon would be best for your situation, preferably with a two pack coating. Done like that, they'll survive anything short of a nuclear bomb.

    Have a read around here: http://www.skinboats.org/

    Got any mates who fly in and out fairly regularly? Might be quite cheap and easy to get the stuff to Ascension if you were cunning about it.

    Speaking of cheap: what's your budget for this?
     
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