Couple of questions about origami

Discussion in 'Software' started by solrac, Apr 19, 2006.

  1. solrac
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    solrac 100% sudaca

    May the professionals excuse me, I'm just an amateur, but I've seen some threads about the subject, photos of the suposed final result, & think there must be some way to meke hulls look smoother (mean not too "angled")
    so, the question, is it possible to make more "cuttings" (i.e. instead of aproximating curve to 3 panels, do it on 6?)
     
  2. Martijn_vE
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    Martijn_vE Marine software developer

  3. solrac
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    solrac 100% sudaca

    thanks Martijn, already seen that site, my question is on another subject, is it posible to improve precision on the origami method by subdividing the lateral resulting panels from the origami model in more subdivisions/more cuts to obtain a less "angled" hull?
    my actual experience on the subject is just trying to unfold a designed hull in AutoCad (drivin' me nuts):rolleyes:
    by the way, there is another interesting proggie, touchcad, but this guys don't allow in the demo mode even print their own models, how are you suposed to test acuracy of it?
    let's see an example:
     

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  4. SeaSpark
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    SeaSpark -

    origami method

    A major point of the origami method is reducing the amount of welding.

    By multiplying the cuts the number of welds increase and so do costs.
     
  5. solrac
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    solrac 100% sudaca

  6. SeaSpark
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    SeaSpark -

    multi chine

    Think what you are referring to is most commonly known as "multi chine" construction.

    It will be possible to achieve a more rounded effect by increasing the number of chines but still at cost of labour. The major reason you want to build a chined hull is reducing costs.

    Still, multi chine hulls can be surprisingly effective.
     
  7. solrac
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    solrac 100% sudaca

    thanks again SeaSpark. as I'm just an amateur, trying to check all posibilities... multichine,origami, & whatever else....
     
  8. ludesign
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    ludesign Senior Member

    As one of the pioneers for the method, I had a US patent for the method in the first half of the seventies, I would say that it offers many advantages over conventional multi-chine designs. The shapes look more rounded, which also adds strength to the skin. No jigs are required. You can assemble even a 30-40 feet long hull in less than a day. Though having some limitations in shapes, the method is surprisingly flexible it terms of what you can do with it. I have used steel, aluminum, plywood and sheets of plastic, and it works fine.

    Some examples can be found here. All examples, except the bottom one are made with this method.

    http://www.touchcad.com/luboatdesign.html
     
  9. Raggi_Thor
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    What about plywood in some areas (like the topsides) and strip planking in other areas (like the bottom)?
    You can have a rather flat area along the keel and another one in the topsides and then strip plank the round "chines" or bilges.

    http://mboats.no/B18/B18_building_pictures.htm
     

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  10. yago
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    yago __

    Yes, you can do more divisions and thus spread the hard transiton between the chined and the forward and aft conical sections over several darts.
    Basically the transtion is harder and shows more "knuckle" the bigger the inside angle of the dart - in your example the darts are very long and narrow cuts and that should give a smooth transition almost without knuckle.

    "Origami" is not really a certain type of hull, you can cut your patterns in many different ways, and that has been done for a long time, in all sorts of materials. For Plywood you have to be careful to get gentle transitions, otherwise you risk breaking the fibre at the end of the dart.

    There is a German who has been doing boats like that forever, maybe since the sixties.. have a look at http://www.dr-segger-boote.de/
    His patterns are completely different from what Brent Swain, Greg Elliot or myself are doing.

    The real advantage is the easy fast assembly method, not the resulting shape itself which can be very close to a round hull - check out the big alloy hull on Greg's origamimagic.com. For a metal boat this also means less seams to weld (if you get full length sheets, that is) and, if you fit your stringers before pullig the hull together, a very nice tension and fair surface.

    Most of all it's just a lot of quick and easy fun to build a hull like that ;-)
     

  11. solrac
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    solrac 100% sudaca

    thanks a lot to all answers, you really helped a lot.
    now it's on me the rest of the process.
    thanks again
     
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