Could someone post a few sheets of any real boat blueprints?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Apr 11, 2011.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I seen lots of dirt construction blueprints and "layouts" of boats as seen on the internet, but not any of what they sell for home builders or the type of plans that might go straight from a NA to a professional shipyard.

    Please feel free to post only part of a sheet, or only one of several sheets or otherwise redact as you see fit so you wont worry about getting yourself in some trouble IP-wise.

    In construction the plans will never give you the actual lengths to which lumber needs to be cut, but instead gives you things like "height to finish ceiling" and you are supposed to 'back-in' to the length of studs from 5/8" rock, carpet, top and bottom plates, etc.

    Then of course you got the plumbing and elec. which are mostly just where 'business end' of those are supposed to end up(more or less) and the tradesman is supposed to know how to run them through the floors and walls, and their exact distances from floor, etc.

    This system was a surprise and disappointment to me as prior to getting into construction I'd taken basic computer graphics course where we wrote are own little XYZ 3-d interference checking programs.


    How are boats plans? And are they very different in the age of CAD?
     
  2. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    See anything by L. Francis Herreshoff for a clear, concise plan. His books "Sensible Cruising Designs" or "Common Sense of Yacht Design" are full of them.
     
  3. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    I think you want more than plans. See "lofting" for more..
    Thou I've seen some dinghy plans with lofted details etc.. With bigger boats there must be some allowance for adjusting lines and measures bcs it's impossible to draw to 1:1 scale IMHO.
     
  4. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    This fits with another of my mini-crusades........That it's not the responsibility of the designer to tell the builder how to build the boat.......It is the designer's responsibility to outline the shape, material, fastening and finish of each part of the boat.........

    See this drawing by one of the great yacht designer's, Al Mason. All the information to build this little boat is presented on one sheet, there is nothing about how to build it....that's up to the builder....

    MasonDebby.jpg
     
  5. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Here's a hand drawn construction drawing I made 23 years ago......The Nantucket Splinter......

    Splinterconst.jpg
     
  6. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    And a recent CAD drawing.......This is a couple of sections from the Berry Point 26' drawings......CAD lends itself to breaking things down to many separate sheets with single parts on them.....hopefully this is less confusing for the builder.......

    View attachment BerryPoint26BULKGplusTransom.pdf
     
  7. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    I like what you did with the shape of the cockpit there, TAD. Very clever.
     
  8. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    RE:I like what you did with the shape of the cockpit there, TAD. Very clever. Reply W

    You mean the angled foot rests?

    Reminds me of sitting in the back of Lincoln Towncar with the "L" long wheelbase and extra 6" of leg room. Only problem is the floor was flat and thus uncomfortable when stretching out legs. They need to add a FootBar rest like on some Greyhound buses or trains.
     
  9. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Not so much as footrests, but it gives you someplace to hook your feet into when heeling.
     
  10. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    You can download some sample plan sheets of my catamaran designs using the link on the home page of my web site. These were draw by hand and hundreds of boats have been built by amateur builders using these plans

    You can download typical CAD drawings if you go to my New Designs page and click on the link for the Skoota 20/24 powercat study plans. They were also drawn "by hand" in the sense that my hand was on the mouse. Like most designers I still don't have a button on my keyboard that says "40ft boat click here"

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    One of my small day boats, 17' 7" on deck, 16' 2" LWL, 6' 2" beam, draft - not much with the board up . . .
     

    Attached Files:

  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Squidly, I think you may be seeing a wide range of plan detail for less then obvious reasons. Plans destined for home builders, usually require a good bit of detail as well as a construction guide, detailed scantlings, call out sheets and other "extras". My home builder plans have several sheets about epoxy use, setting up a shop, how to make scarfs, liquid joinery techniques, etc. A plan set, sent to a professional doesn't require any of this. In fact, if you as a designer are familiar with the builder, then they don't need much more then basic construction drawings, scantlings and lines. From this and prior experience with the designers work, they know what to do and how the designer wants it done. The other end of this scale is the home builder who needs a BOM, design overview and general nurse maiding texts to get through the process.
     

  13. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I'm reminded of the time I spent as a tract superintendent, back in the day -- you know, when Moby Dick was a minnow, and I was an up-and-coming leading light in the construction industry....

    Anyway, a homeowner harassed me for weeks, demanding a set of blueprints for the home he had built. I refused him on several grounds: for starters, we didn't own the plans; the architect did. We had only bought the right to build 'x' number of houses per the plans he supplied.

    Secondly, there are folks (believe it or not:)) who are such scumbags they would go through the plans comparing them with the house as built, looking for differences -- and then sue us because we had moved a window six inches to accommodate the framing layout, or because the stairs required one tread more or less than the architect's draftsman had free-handed in.

    I finally managed to arrange a face-to-face meeting with the homeowner, to find out why he was pounding on the subject so hard. I found out he wanted to cut a hole in the wall of his master bath for another medicine cabinet, and he wanted to know if there were going to be any studs or electrical wiring in the way.

    I was completely unable to convince him that the plans wouldn't show him the location of every stick of wood in the framing instead of simply the overall dimensions of each wall. Or the exact path the wiring took, instead of simply the locations of each outlet, switch and light fixture.

    When it got to the point where he was about to start spending money on lawyers and force my boss to do the same, I strapped on a tool belt one Saturday morning. I used an electronic stud finder to locate the 2x4's in the wall, and a voltage detector to make sure there weren't any wires directly in the way. Then I cut him an opening for his cabinet.

    I didn't even get lunch or a beer out of the morning; he was peeved because the location of the studs meant I had to move his medicine cabinet a few inches to the left to fit between them. No good deed goes unpunished...

    But at least I did some lawyers out of work. I suppose that was compensation enough for my shot morning.

    My point, after all this rambling? Sometimes amateurs don't realize that most plans simply show the overall shape and dimensions of a project -- you know, the end result and enough information to get there. They don't necessarily show the actual locations and dimensions of every stick of wood, every piece of wire, and every length of pipe.
     
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