Costa Concordia, 80 deg list, really scary !!

Discussion in 'Stability' started by smartbight, Jan 15, 2012.

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  1. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Evidently, they don't want to cut it up on-sight because it is in an ecological reserve.

    Remember, the submerged metal weighs 30% less due to buoyancy, however, it's mass remains unchanged.

    Of course, they will be overcoming the inertia of the sea water that fills it as well...

    Watch and learn.

    It's a 400 million dollar class room.

    Fascinating.
     
  2. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    You can ask them at http://www.theparbucklingproject.com/aziende.php and ... they will not reply. I have tried.

    I have a distinct feeling that the mass 60 000 tons of the wreck+sponsoons minus the buoyancy of X m3 of submerged wreck items = say 40 000 tons of load on P will crush the sea floor and/or wreck bilge structure and/or pull wires at point P during the parbuckling and there will be a mess.

    I cannot understand why conventional and tried salvage methods are not used, e.g. just lifting the wreck upwards using pontoons and then pumping it dry, etc.

    It is a mystery - like the 4 200 persons that spent a night at Porto Giglio and then disappeared. Where did they sleep?
     
  3. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    There are no answers only speculation and then, the results.

    Wait and see.
     
  4. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Of course you can, this is a relatively easy job, because she is not even on her beam ends the job is half done. The only issue here is the support of the grounding weight, and I'm sure that they have poured footings for that. The USS Oklahoma (only 27,500 LT) was tough because she was totaly rolled with all her superstructure crushed. Took 3 years to raise her.

    http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/pearlhbr/ph-ok9.htm

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Hm, the USS Oklahoma was parbuckled towards the shore in 1943. Now, 2013, 70 years later, they will parbuckle M/S Costa Concordia away from the shore onto an underwater platform. Isn't there a difference? :rolleyes:
    Anyway, we will see what happens next. And who is going to pay?
     
  6. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Not really, FWIW, the arrangement is smart because the port pontoon has enough buoyancy to keep the port side up. You will actually have to haul the ship down onto the platform for fitting of the stbd pontoon. For this operation, the rigging is correct.

    Who pays? The insurance company (the subscribers)...and if they default the government (the taxpayers). This is why most ships operate under shell company charters.
     
  7. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    You do not need to haul down anything - just ballast the port sponsoon and you land on the platform after the circus performance. But before that happens the wreck will balance on its starboard bilge in contact with the sea floor and ... suddenly ... the whole wreck tips/rotates outwards and produces a mini tsunami, when the port sponsoons are submerged. Then the wreck will rotate inwards again producing a tsunami in that direction. The wreck will also rotate longitudinally and send a tsunami wave into the port of Giglio.
    I sincerely hope the H&M and P&I underwriters do not pay for this nonsense as the capsize was due to ship being not seaworthy, etc, etc, i.e. the insurance cannot have been valid.
     
  8. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Which is why you haul it down...so the trolls don't do the rolls... :rolleyes:

    You never, ever, control touchdown with ballast...too much free surface and other problems.
     
  9. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Only free surface is outside and it is a problem splashing into it. It is like launching a ship sideways into a canal or a river. Having met a male bunch of the 400 salvors the other day at Porto Giglio, I wondered if they were paid at all. They looked pretty rotten, unshaven, confused, dirty and thirsty. They had no idea! And probably didn't care.
     
  10. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    The free surface of most concern is on the inside...
     
  11. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    No, the wreck is 100% full of water = no free surfaces inside there.:D:rolleyes::)

    And the sponsoons on the port outside are empty = no free surfaces there either. :p
     
  12. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Look at the picture.

    The boat is ~65% full of water.
     
  13. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Oh, I see, they brought in the best of the best. Really, you should spend more time with working salvors and divers before drawing conclusions. They are smart, rich as Croesus, and don't give a damn about what you or most other people outside the job think. They are the people who lesser men call in to do the dirty, dangerous, work. If you get a chance to work with them...watch, listen, and learn. They have earned the right to "look" like that.

    First time I worked with salvage divers I had to cross a "brow" over to a dive boat. The "brow" was a 10m ladder. You had to walk on the rungs, no hand rails, 4m drop into the water. I was the first (and only) engineer to walk across it. They had put it up to keep the "deadwood" out. I had no problem with them after that, you just had to take the pranks and give as good as you got. They live in a clearly defined "on job"/"off job" world where deeds and ability, not pieces of paper or titles matter. A world where everyone pulls their weight " on job" or somebody dies.
     
  14. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    You were the one who brough up ballasting down (post #397), I , and others are just trying to point out your missconception on how this will work. Now that you understand how simple it really is, you understand that "tidal wave" during haul down will not occur.

    Glad to have been a help to you. :D
     

  15. smartbight
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    smartbight Naval Architect

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