Cost of building a Wooden, Monohull, small, sailing yacht

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by ironmetal250, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. ironmetal250
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    ironmetal250 Junior Member

  2. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    $1000-$1500 USD sounds awfully optimistic for a 24', 6000 lb motorsailer. Lead ballast alone is around $1500 a tonne.

    The materials list provided with the article is handy, but incomplete. It doesn't mention a number of expensive things, like fasteners, ballast or paint.

    Some of the other folks around here have built wooden boats using this kind of construction method and may be able to ballpark the cost-per-tonne. But your best bet would be to do up a spreadsheet, listing ALL the required materials, and get local prices. Don't forget the sales tax, and that everything boat-related always costs at least 150% of what you expect!
     
  3. ironmetal250
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    ironmetal250 Junior Member

    Haha, yeah. I'm thinking it would probably be around $10,000... I'll figure out the exact prices later... do you think I could still get the full size plans, or would the company not be selling them anymore?

    I 'd actually rather build a smaller pure sailboat (no motor) that's capable of offshore cruising, but I don't think that's even possible. And dangerous without the motor.
     
  4. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    $4-6 dollars a pound is pretty normal if you don't use 'exotic" materials for the hull, plus engine and hardware and everything else that makes it useful. A lighter, more modern design might be well worth considering and probably a lot quicker to build. Or buy a used hull and modify to suit, and save time and money.
     
  5. ironmetal250
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    ironmetal250 Junior Member

    bruceb, could you suggest a design? I'm looking for a small wooden sailboat that's buildable within a budget of 10,000 that could be taken solo cruising offshore. 18-22' would be a good length, if possible. I've done searching and can't really find anything that fits that criteria, so it makes me think there is no such boat.
     
  6. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    this could be a similar design that falls within your scope

    https://www.boatdesigns.com/products.asp?dept=432

    i dont know about US$ 10k but at current exchange rates (10:1) you could build a whole lot of that boat (in South Africa) for that money if you worked hard at it yourself.

    from where i stand it is actually do-able
     
  7. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    experience??

    Ironmetal, I am not up to date on the designs available, and certainly not the best to advise you on a choice- I am way too biased. I was a boat dealer in the southeast for 12 years and I still "mess" with boats. I have built several small plywood boats and will probably build some more- I guess I like sawdust, but if low cost/time is any part of the consideration, buying an older boat, wood or glass, is a much better choice. For 5-10 thousand dollars you can find some really good 1960s -80s boats, power and sail. I see them everywhere. You could be afloat in a few months instead of a few years. I bought a boat this past summer from your area that cost me less than the gas I used to go get it, and I was sailing three weeks later. Do you want to build, or do you want to float? That said, (my opinion only!!), smaller- under 23'- light plywood power boats can be cost effective and very useful, but most sailboats are not. Used glass sailboats are so cheap, have decent hull design, and come with all the expensive equipment. Shop well, you can learn a lot about boats just looking, and it costs nothing.
     
  8. ironmetal250
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    ironmetal250 Junior Member

    I won't be sailing for a couple of years anyway - I'll be going to college and grad school for the next eight years.

    I'll keep in mind what you said about buying boats though, thanks.

    Also, thanks for the suggestion, Maine... that boat looks awesome. I'm going to try and start a boat building organization at the college I go to, so maybe everyone who joins (probably like two or three other people, lol) could work on one boat like that and get it done by the end of the year.
     
  9. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Nice boat

    That is an interesting boat. That is why these forums are great. Ironmetal, I would suggest building a small boat, something under 15 feet to get some experience. You will have something to use while you are in school, and it will help in enticing other prospective boat builders. The first boat seems to be the hardest, after it floats, you just keep looking for the next project.
     
  10. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

  11. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    I am new to the forum and hadn't seen that. Congrats Ironwood. Have you finished it, I didn't see any posts after August? Bruce
     
  12. ironmetal250
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    ironmetal250 Junior Member

    Only about halfway done... still have to fiberglass and paint and add some pieces.
     

  13. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Ironwood, you have done a lot- just stick with it. You have done the hard stuff, already. I wish I could have chimed in before you started, I have built or assisted on several boats. Tack and tape, stitch and glue, what ever you call them, LOOK easy, but take a lot of time, much of it sanding. I hate sanding. "Conventional" construction does require some accurate measurements, but is really much less time consuming for building a small boat. I have built both types- from the same designer (Bolger), and both ways can make a nice boat, but the tack, tape and glass takes at least twice as long and costs more than twice as much. The glassed boat might have an edge on durability, but I am still using a 25 year old Bolger dingy that was built out of cheap materials in less than 20 hours and painted with house paint. Like any work boat, it gets a new coat when it needs one, and it just keeps going. Bruce
     
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