Coronavirus lessons: Antiviral/antibacterial surfaces being explored?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by JosephT, Mar 10, 2020.

  1. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    With the high number of cruise ship passengers impacted by this virus, I am curious if this industry has explored antiviral and antibacterial surface technologies. Is there a specification for this yet? All too often these days people are trapped on these vessels and taking on various illnesses. The company referenced below produces a "broad spectrum biocide". Sounds promising!

    We now have entire nations in quarantine. Unbelievable!

    Do chime in with any thoughts or suggestions! Cleaning products aside, do any other companies make suitable surface coating products?

    Ref: Broad-Spectrum Biocide and Antiviral Coating | Federal Labs https://federallabs.org/technology/broad-spectrum-biocide-and-antiviral-coating-1
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2020
  2. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    20 years ago I was selling gel coat with an anti microbial ingredient, nothing new about it.

    These ingredients are rather controversial in the same way antibiotics are.

    And saying they would help much is purely speculative.
     
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  3. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

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  4. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

  5. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    I know of some people who believe in the benefits of wearing copper bracelets.
     
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  6. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Too late for that ship docked in Oakland. That NIH study is quite interesting though.

    “...solid-state Cu2O disrupts host cell recognition by denaturing protein structures on viral surfaces, leading to the inactivation of viruses regardless of the presence of a viral envelope.”

    Ships should take a closer look at this Cu2O compound. It might reduce some of the risk and outrageous ongoing cleaning expenses.
     
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  7. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Not to be a killjoy, but...

    The real trouble is too many people on the ships. Airborne bugs have human surfaces to land. Staff on a ship can sneeze and send thousands of droplets onto the dinner of hundreds. HVAC fans also drive airborne pathogens.

    If you could find a way to kill a layer of pathogens measured in many micrometers and not a physical count; you may have something.

    Railings. A serious problem.

    The problem is also cultural. Too many onboard and the ships are too large and hungry for fares.

    Almost everything we are seeing is related to international travel. Imagine a cruise ship that fever screened, for an example of culture change. Of course, that would not help. What if ir cameras were sensitive enough to spot fevered persons? Not saying it would stop things, but it may help.
     
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  8. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    I agree the big ships just have too many people on them. It appears there are smart watches that now track body temperature. Perhaps cruise ships should require pre-screening by a doctor (no fever or other symptoms). Any physician qualified to perform a physical could do it. Makes a lot of sense especially when there is a viral outbreak without a vaccine.
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Fever screenings at boarding would be free and ideal and make people feel safer as a norm.
     
  10. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    This is true, but most come by plane, train or automobile to get to the port...spreading illness along the way. Ideally, a pre-travel health check by a certified professional would ideal. It only takes a single person to wreck the vacation of a lifetime for many passengers. We had a trip planned to southern Italy this June. We had to postpone for another year. No problem. Better safe than sorry. Lots of vacation & business travel upside down right now.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The large cruise ships have up to 9,000 people between passengers and crew. It would take days to screen them all.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    At least some of the cruise lines have suspended operations, they seem wonderful incubators those ships.
     
  13. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Last edited: Mar 16, 2020

  14. The Q
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    The Q Senior Member

    The company I work for has just issued a IR Thermometer to every employee, Well we do make them , this is the cheapest one we do at £100.. We are expected to test ourselves before comeing to work every day..

    The one big antiviral substance is brass and copper handles. Part of the big increase in Hospital born sickeness is over the last 50 years they changed over from brass and copper to plastic and stainless because it was cheaper and needed less cleaning..
     
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