Coronado15 Rebuild

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by 5monkeys, Dec 31, 2015.

  1. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    Hi Folks,
    I'm new around here. I bought this c15 on Ebay for $100. It's my first sailboat and my first endeavor into working on boats.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105002&stc=1&d=1451571753

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105003&stc=1&d=1451571364


    It looks like I'm in for some fun as the bulkhead is sheared away from the hull and the compression post that supports the mast step is clearly busted.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105004&stc=1&d=1451571364

    So I guess those need to be replaced. I ended up on this site searching for "help and how to's"and discovered Canracer's boat. Rather than permanently hijack his thread I decided I'd better start my own.

    The next step is to remove the old bulkhead. Oh and did I mention, I have 5 kids between 16 and 6... so this isn't the only thing we have going on, I hope to have her back in the water by late spring... Here's hoping!

    kb
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    After all the demolition, I used a tape measure to get the size of the space where the new post would be installed so it really depends on what kind of space you can make.. The replacement is slightly longer and wider than the old post, but not by much. Factor in about an 8th of an inch, to make space for thickened epoxy (top and bottom.)

    Here is the area at the top of the post. This adhesive is like concrete, and it's probably not necessary to remove completely. You will however, want to have a close look, after the old post is removed, and determine what you have left to work with. If all the punky wood is gone, then you'll want a flat surface for the top of the new post. See what the deal is after removal, and then decide.

    Here is a look at the concrete like adhesive. It took a 6" disk on an an angle grinder and then a hammer and chisel to remove, but that's not absolutely necessary.
    [​IMG]


    Here is the back side of the post and the front side of the centerboard trunk. Important: The post is sitting on top of a strip of plywood and it might be rotten too (see that radius?) It just doesn't make good sense to install a new post on top of that rotten base. Pull it out, is the best advise I got. This whole area could be built up with one solid piece of lumber (the new compression post,) eliminating that flimsy middle part. The end grain of the "strip" is not sealed, so it soaks up water like a sponge and then it rots, everything starts to "work" on the softened base, then the bulkhead rips apart and eventually the compression post breaks in two (just a theory.)
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Here was my rebuilt post in roughly the final shape. It's 6 layers of 3/8th Okume. I tried to use less expensive plywood for an earlier repair, and the stuff completely disintegrated. Finding good lumber for the post is important because lots of other materials will not hold up.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    I've got some 1" oak in the garage, I was considering coating them completely in epoxy and laminating 3 or four pieces together alternating the grain 90 degree's with each...is that crazy? I figure the USS Constitution and the USS Constellation are both made of oak and they're still floating after 200 years...
     
  5. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    If it's white oak, it will be good. Red oak is very very poor.
     
  6. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

  7. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
    Posts: 147
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    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    I put about 10 minutes to good use last night and removed the old bulkhead, I decided to see how effective It would be to just reach in with my bare hands and pull...I'd say 99% of the bulkhead has been removed and it's only in 3 or 4 pieces. It was extremely brittle and easy to pull out. Especially since it was mostly sheared away anyhow.

    Here's the view inside the boat now as seen by an iphone on a selfie stick

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105091&stc=1&d=1452173997
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Congratulations on starting the demolition! It's looking better already. I read that article and PAR likes Douglas fir over any kind of oak. I wonder if you could find some for cheap. Can you pull those flotation blocks out?
     
  9. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    5monkeys Senior Member

    I'll check the local home depot for doug fir, looks like they might at least have 2x4's 2x6's etc.. I can see that working to build a compression post but not the bulkhead...I'll look and see what's there. I haven't tried to move the flotation blocks, I guess I can check and see how easily they move tonight. What do you see as the pro's and con's of taking the foam out?
     
  10. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Canracer Senior Member

    They might be attached, or they might be free. Somehow, I was able to pull mine out but I think I used a ridiculously big hunting knife to cut them in half. This was the only way they would fit out through the hatch. Save that stuff.

    You will need some room to demo and then reinstall the post. If they are in there solidly, maybe just chip away at the ends until you have enough removed. This is a good project for a kid. Clean up all the dust with a shop vac and send in the cheap labor.:)
     
  11. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    The flotation in my boat was "connected" with these strange tabs. I'm not sure if this was the intended purpose of the tabs, because they could have just as easily been intended to secure the stringers to the hull. When mass producing boats, I guess that "stuff happens." Anyway, the blocks pulled right out.
    [​IMG]

    This is what it looked like when I pulled a block. I had a forward bulkhead already installed so that's why I had to cut the block during removal. Yours might be easier.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Here is a look at the new post installed, and that forward bulkhead I mentioned. The bulkhead was made with 3/4 inch pressure treated exterior grade plywood. It's WAY overdone, but it has remained very solid, so it might be a good material for a new post. On the other hand, it's very heavy and very expensive. Maybe the same price as good marine grade ply (and it really never gets wet.)
    [​IMG]
     
  13. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    Thanks Canracer,
    I didn't get much done on the boat, but it was kind of damp inside, not sure how much of that is humidity from the changing temp's we've had or if it's just wet from being out in the rain until about a month ago. Either way I want to get it dried out. So I pulled our dehumidifier out of storage and connected it to the hatch with a garbage bag tunnel. I just hooked it up last night, so we'll see when I get home how much water I've pulled out of her.

    [​IMG]

    Once she's dry, I'll send in the monkey's with the shop vac. :)
     

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  14. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    I see that you got the teak mast partner removed. How did that go?
     

  15. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    5monkeys Senior Member

    It came off without too much of a fight, the wood is in pretty rough shape, and will need a good bit of attention before going back on. I'm pretty sure that was one of the sources for rainwater getting inside. The outside corners of the wood weren't in contact with the fiberglass on the boat, they had pulled away, but given the status of the compression post and the bulkhead, I imagine that the boat pulled away from the wood not the other way around. I'm not sure how exactly I'm gonna get the shape back. Also there are what appear to be some serious cracks in the glazing on the deck under the mast partner, I'll get some pic's and post those too. Maybe tonight when I check the water in the dehumidifier.

    Hey, I found 1/2" marine grade doug- fir locally for about $100..so I'll probably pick up a sheet of that this week sometime..
     
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