Coronado 15 Repair Help

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by multivariablespace, Aug 1, 2017.

  1. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    I wanted to keep access to the interior of my hull, so I took the "box in" route. If you choose to install bulkheads and decide to change things up, they can easily be cut out at some point down the line. All it takes is a saw and some sandpaper.

    Back to the topic of "right-ability:" It's possible to capsize a small sailboat dozens of times and it's still all fun and games. Then there's that one capsize that's way more dangerous than fun. The guy in this image took his C15 off the California coast. He tried to make a passage from one harbor to the next. Notice the old style stock centerboard (and the hull probably has all the usual issues.) Here's the scenario; "offshore C15 guy" capsizes and then climbs onto the centerboard. All the righting force he put into the centerboard was absorbed by the hull (and board) like everything was a big block of foam rubber. Have you ever tried to move one of those memory foam mattresses? They're very stubborn because the foam absorbs all your force. I think it's easier to move a piano. Ok, I've gone on for too long about this. The final takeaway is that I had a messy capsize one day, and later read the news report about this "offshore C15 guy." I was sailing in a protected bay, not the open Gulf, however a solid hull and board was deemed to be the right upgrade.

    Rescue helicopter saved his life.
    c15.jpg

    All those little slot gasket screws: For sure they will leak. Back each one off and put epoxy on the threads, then reinstall (and wipe away the excess.) Maybe you already did that.
    gasket3.jpg

    After enough hull flexing a crack will appear (and cause a leak) at the forward radius of the slot. I ground it down to form a dished out area and laid in some cloth patches (five I think.) Topped it off with fairing compound. You'll also want to consider a repair from inside the hull.
    crack2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018
  2. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

    I made some good progress on the rudder, I'll send pictures when the epoxy dries. I think it really looks nice.

    I used that 3M marine sealant on the centerboard gasket screws, hopefully they hold water, we'll find out soon when I put it in the lake. I was thinking I'd throw a bunch of towels in the bottom to try and see where any water comes from. Maybe I can see what's getting wet first if the water doesn't slosh around and figure out where it's coming from.

    That capsized boat is crazy. I do all my sailing on a little lake.
    upload_2018-10-10_20-48-45.png
     
  3. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    What type of sealant did you use? There's so many different types of 3M products. A while back I considered replacing my rudder with one from a catamaran. Those cat folks are always buying new rudders and selling the old ones on ebay. They are designed well and who knows, might work pretty good on a C15.
     
  4. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

  5. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

    I'm puzzled a bit by the rigging. Any pictures you can share?
     
  6. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    The rudder look pretty good. How did you reinforced the top?

    The rig is straight forward. What are you wondering about?
     
  7. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

    My boom has three pulleys attached to it. Two in the middle and one at the end. The Barney post has two pulleys, a double block I think it's called (I'm traveling and don't have a picture). I have a bar for the traveler, but no hardware for it.

    I think the main sheet would go from one's hand, through the cleat on the barney post swivel, around the lower pulley on the barney post, to the more mastward pulley on the boom, back down to the upper pulley on the barney post, to the 2nd mastward pulley on the boom, then tie off on the bar where the traveler used to be? Kind of like the picture in the manual except without the Boom Vaug and with the traveler pulley as the top pulley on the barney post. I can't tell in the manual where the line ties off, and that's why I was thinking of just tying it to the traveler bar, but I'm not sure. Maybe a loose bowline where it ties to the traveler rod so the line can slide.




    upload_2018-10-16_19-23-57.png
    I saw this drawing, which would explain the pulley at the end of the boom, with the extra pulley in the middle just to add another loop for mechanical advantage. My boat has some tie downs but no holes where the mainsheet tails are shown going through the deck at the back of the boat. I don't think the tie downs would support the mainsheet without ripping out, they are held down by like two 1/4" screws. My guess is they are to put a shock cord in place to hold the rudder, but I'm not sure.
    upload_2018-10-16_19-38-0.png

    I'm not sure what the best way to rig it up is.
     
  8. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    I think your boat was set up for stern sheeting. It a good arrangement. This would also explain why you have no traveler hardware. Are those 1/4" screws (for the stern tie downs) really 1/4" bolts? I wonder if maybe those are bolts (and not screws) with nuts fastened under the rub rail. That might be strong enough.

    Do you have a complete boom vang?
     
  9. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

    Yes, they are bolts, with a nut under the rub rail. They looks small, but I guess the line is attached on both sides. No, I don't have any of the boom vang parts.
     
  10. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

    Is it advisable to put a float on the top of the mast to keep it from going upside down if it rolls over?
     
  11. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Not really necessary. It depends on the wind, you can decrease the chances of capsizing by not sailing downwind in heavy air. How much sailing experience do you have?
     
  12. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    If you've had some experience with righting a capsized boat then you should have no problem. What you're talking about is "turtling ." Some boats will turtle easier than others (and I've done it at least a dozen time.) But I wouldn't worry about that in a C15. When I go out sailing the crew is informed that the "no capsize policy" is in effect. An experienced sailor will no what that means and a new sailor won't (but the policy is still in effect.) To avoid capsize just sail smart. Keep an eye on the wind so you're not surprised by a big puff and never relax on a downwind course (if the wind is strong, don't sail directly downwind, and don't jibe.) If you do capsize then act fast and get off the hull, swim to the centerboard. Grab the end of the board right away and always keep leverage on the hull. If you instead swim around to find lost gear like sunscreen, hat and shades, then the boat will get harder and harder to right. Keep gear stowed and get straight to the task of righting the hull. After some practice you could do it in you're sleep.
     
  13. multivariablespace
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Moses Lake

    multivariablespace Junior Member

    I got everything loaded up and drove down to the dock Friday and they had removed the dock for the winter. I'm not sure I'll be able to launch and rig without the dock in place (plus the water is pretty gross and I'd have to swim it off the trailer). It looks like I'll probably be tarping it up till spring. Thanks for all the help.
     

  14. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    I moved this summer from Florida to New York. Snow on the ground here.
     
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