Coronado 15 missing traveler

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by tschlink, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    One thing for sure - the boat won't sail well with the distorted shape.
     
  2. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    I guess that strip is a keelson. Good call. I don't really see anything miss-shaped in that image. Is there a big dent or "buckle" in the bottom of the hull?

    I'm talking about below the water line. Is there a big dent?

    The bow area is accessible and you are planning to do work there anyway. So depending on the nature of the damage, it might be easy to deal with. Post a picture so we can see what happened.
     
  3. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    Good advice PAR. I've seen your comments about hull damage based on trailers. based on trailer damage. My hope is that delaminating fiberglass from heat and sun exposure are the only causes.

    For my little C-15 I'll be rebuilding the bow and hull joint from the keelson up.

    Then I'm going to add bunks to the trailer because there is next to no support on the boat's keel.
     

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  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sailboats are a lot more difficult to "bend" back into shape with heat. This is because you're guessing to the amount of rocker that's suppose to be there. Rapidly boiling water in a bigass tray, under the distorted area will help soften the area, but it's not enough to make the 'glass soft enough to move, even with some force applied. Maybe with some heat gun work on the inside will do it, but it's still a guessing game. How deep is the distortion and how big (length and width)? Less then a couple of inches can be moved with heat, if not too big an area ( a few square feet), as it cools too fast to be effective, unless a few guns are in action at the same time. This can be forced close and filled afterward to fair it up. If it's much deeper, you'd be better advised to cut and push, the distorted areas down so they're close enough, where you don't need 5 gallons of putty it fair it again. The relief cuts can be oriented to make this easier, so take a good look and picture what would happen if you made radial or longitudinal cuts and how these wedges can be pushed into position and held there, while you apply fabrics to hold it, both inside and out. You'll need more laminate thickness than what was originally used, just to hold it, possibly with some additional internal support (centerline rib, etc.) to maintain the rocker.
     
  5. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    The Coronado is a fairly lightly built boat.
    You might jack up the boat by the hull to deck flange and see how much the bend from the bow roller is relaxed.
    I wouldn't expect it to all be taken out, but it might be enough where you could reinforce from the inside, support the boat on better bunks, fill the dip from the outside (with glass - mostly), and then fair out the bottom.
    Something similar to what PAR was saying.
    But all that depends on if you still have the bend while jacked up off the bow roller. It is easy to do by using a 2x4 on the deck to hull flange at the bow (as close as you can get) using an automotive floor jack. The whole boat only weights 360# with mast etc.
    All PAR's tricks with heat could also be used when you find out how much the bend relaxes.

    I had a poor support and the aft crosswise bunk was causing the hull to bulge upward on either side of the keel line.
    Putting in a longitudinal bunk one each side and making sure the bunk supported along it's full length removed the bulge (or dip) to the extent that I can't see it.
    Unfortunately, I would have to cut out the transom to reinforce that area from inside. So that won't happen unless I have to fix the transom.
     
  6. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Now that the hull is suspended, maybe you can put something heavy inside the hull right above the dent. (not too heavy though)
     
  7. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    And if you put a light bulb inside the hull, it will warm things up.
    cat1.jpg
     
  8. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    A 500w halogen can be bought cheap and they get very warm. Think twice before putting one of these halogens inside the hull, but under the hull it's a good set up.
    hull1.jpg

    Throw some blankets or an old carpet over the hull and it will retain more heat. In this picture I'm warming up the bow.
    blanket1.jpg
     
  9. tschlink
    Joined: Nov 2017
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    Location: Tempe, AZ

    tschlink Junior Member

    Hey guys. Just thought I mocked up a crude and not to scale diagram of the Coronado 15 sole.
    Any suggestions for how to remove the keelson? Slow going for me as I am doing it by hand with hammer and chisel.
    Any feedback on the image would be great. Just hoping to make sure everyone is on the same page.

    I doubt that I'll heat the fiberglass. I'm more inclined to use a spreader clamp that applies pressure onto some plywood from within the cuddy. Then epoxy and glass it into place. If I can repair the trailer then it *shouldn't* revert back. Am I on track with this idea or way off the mark?
     

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  10. tschlink
    Joined: Nov 2017
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    tschlink Junior Member

    By the way, I'm sorry this thread took a left turn from discussing the traveler. I really appreciate all the feedback. It's encouraging because I have no idea what I'm doing.
     
  11. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    The glass is not very strong and if you can get the chisel under an edge, it won't be to much trouble (no promises though.) I recall using a grinder for part of the job. The glass extends out past the edge of the plywood, you might be able to peel the whole thing up with the chisel if you're careful.
     
  12. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    You have the right idea here. The spine and mast support could be all one piece. And it would be stronger if it matched that angle on the centerboard trunk. The forward section of the spine (in illustration) has a complicated shape. Maybe that's how the factory piece looked but I wouldn't try to copy that original arrangement.
    C15Sole1.jpg
     
  13. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Here's a look at the space in front of the centerboard trunk. In the original construction, this area was a weak point. If the compression post and spine were one piece, and glassed into the trunk, the hull, and the cockpit sole, the boat would be much stronger (everything tied together.) Don't worry to much about weight, the increase would be something equivalent to having an extra six pack on board. And a strong boat is faster than a lighter weak boat.
    centerstrip3.jpg

    This is the area cleaned and prepared for new epoxy.
    crack3.jpg

    The centerboard imparts large side to side forces. I epoxied into place these "cheek blocks" in order to reinforce the trunk where those lateral forces act on the hull.
    cbtrunk2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2017
  14. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    It might be a good idea to extend those cheek blocks a little further aft, and forward to the bow. This would form an I-beam type reinforcement and your hull would never bend again.
     

  15. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    5monkeys Senior Member

    Tschlink,
    My keelson was so rotted, prying it out wasn't an option, but the grinder made quick work of cleaning out the spongy splinters. When I replaced my " compression post assembly".. I shaped it so that it filled that entire space back to the CB trunk. although not part of my original design, I did end up adding a "cap" to the whole thing which you can see in pic3 below.

    compresson post project design.png IMG_0803.JPG bulkhead glassed.jpg
     
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