Coronado 15 missing traveler

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by tschlink, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The traveler setup I've shown is for a larger boat, but a simple arrangement.
     
  2. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Tschlink,

    Do you actually want to put back the original traveler as in post #4?
     
  3. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    It all makes sense with the second block. Truthfully, I’m not partial to a method so long as it’s smooth and doesn’t lag on jibes. But that could be more of an equipment failure over a set up failure. I’ll have to get back in the water to decide.
     
  4. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    Just thought I would also share these images as I removed the old mast support. It’s regular pine with a cut channel to straddle the spine. Got a quality piece of teak to craft a replacement and will do so over the next couple weeks. Upchurchmr has some quality images that I’ll imitate.
     

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  5. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    when you put the mast support back in, coat it liberally with epoxy. Possibly even with glass/ epoxy just to make sure you have enough epoxy to protect the wood.
    There is also a plywood piece bonded into the floor just under the mast support and the ply stiffener you can see in the second picture.
    If this is rotted, you will need to grind out the glass covering it and put in a new support.
    Otherwise the mast will just compress the rotten wood, shifting the position of the mast and moving the deck glass around in the same manner that broke the gell coat around the cutout in the first picture.
     
  6. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    It appears to be rotted. More than likely it too will have to be ground out, replaced, and glassed.

    What about the raised spine that sits on the wood? Does that matter?

    Thinking about adding support under the foredeck and just behind the cuddy hatch. Should I figure it out while I have the boat open and disassembled or get some sailing in and work on it when the temps hit 100f?
     
  7. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    What makes you think you need the additional support under the foredeck and just behind the cuddy hatch?

    I assume the raised spine had a purpose so I would replace it. especially since it is easy to get to.
    There has been discussion about adding supports under the deck at the chain plates (the attachment of the shrouds). Since the factory put these in the boat for the later boats I assume it would be a good idea. Also on my boat some of the gell coat right around this area is cracked which shows that the deck in this area is not too stiff. This seems to be a pretty big job - I haven't attempted it.
     
  8. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Here is a link to a thread on the forum. It's a C15 project with many pictures and discussions about all the issues. Unfortunately I was using Photobucket and so many of my pictures are not visible.

    This will start you at the 16th page but read through everything.
    Coronado15 Rebuild https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/coronado15-rebuild.54844/page-16

    I just realized those photos are missing and I'll work at editing the posts.
     
  9. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    And yes, that "raised spline" should be removed if it's rotten. From your image it looks like the bulkhead (on each side of the compression post) has detached from the inside surface of the hull. If you pull out that bulkhead you'll have much more space to work.

    This is what's behind the compression post and in front of the centerboard trunk. That center section is a stiffener. Everything was installed on top of a strip of plywood that was glassed to the bottom of the hull. The wood absorbs water from the exposed end grain and the piece rots. When it gets soft everything starts to move around and slowly pull apart. You might consider pulling out the detached bulkhead and also remove the plywood strip. Build the new compression post on a solid foundation.
    centerstrip3.jpg

    The area in front of the centerboard trunk cleaned and ready to rebuild.
    crack3.jpg

    I removed the plywood and built up the "keel strip" area with solid fiberglass and stringers. It about 7 layers of 10 ounce cloth and maybe a few extra under the post. (long time ago.)
    stringers1.jpg

    Looking aft toward the centerboard trunk.
    stringers2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2017
  10. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    You can see, in the previous image, that a slot was cut into the glass strips so that the reinforcement would continue along the sides of the centerboard trunk. The hull really likes to flex at this point, right in front of the trunk. A crack will start and grow and eventually cause a leak. This image shows the crack at this flex point.
    cbtrunk1.jpg

    The "hinge point crack" had to also be repaired on the bottom of the hull. I sanded down into the hull and a few layers of cloth patch were added and then faired.
    crack1.jpg

    Here's a look at the new compression post installed. The image also shows the bulkhead I installed in the bow section. That's another story though. Maybe these pictures and explanations can help with your project. Another guy on this forum, 5monkeys, has also worked through many of these same repairs. The projects involved hours of thinking and rethinking and then some trial and error, so go ahead and ask anything.
    newstep1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2017
  11. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    Thanks Canracer and Upchurchmr. I read through page 16-21 of the forum. After some deep thoughts on my end-game.

    1. Replace the bulkhead.
    2. Replace plywood from the cabin to the centerboard trunk.
    3. Replace the compression post.
    4. Glass it together in a way that strengthens the entire boat.
    5. Sail.

    After a few months of sailing decide on a full or partial rebuild.

    I’ll keep posting pictures. I really really love the forum. You guys and 5Monkeys are killing it. Somebody needs to turn all y’alls knowledge into a book.
     
  12. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    The pity is that the Coronado 15 association web site does not have all this information - and probably more.
    All three of us are newcomers to the boat.

    The web site "had" a section called maintenence.
    It has some suggestions by a long term sailor and expert.
    Someone took it off the site.

    I asked about that, no one has answered.
     
  13. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

  14. tschlink
    Joined: Nov 2017
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    tschlink Junior Member

    I’ve been working in the sole of the boat. It is slow going, as like all of us, time is limited. But I noticed today that there is major sag in the bow, like a hyperextended joint. The boat is 40 years old, it’s previous owner kept in the sun uncovered for 10 years, and I think the way it sits on the trailer’s roller accentuates the problem. I don’t have the resources to pull the boat off and set it somewhere else or the ability to turn it over. So I strung tie down straps under the bow to correct the issue. Now when I replace keelson and glass it should be in the right position.
     

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  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This is a common problem, though mostly seen on powerboats with poorly fitted trailers. 'Glass has a "memory" if it's subjected to loads continuously over a long time. If the boat is "released" from the load (poorly fitting trailer) it'll remember the imposed shape it was forced into and will not pop back into it's previous position. There are only a couple ways to fix this and none are very enjoyable. The first and least desirable is heat. You can prop, brace, cuss at and convince the boat back into the shape it formerly was and apply heat, with a heat gun and the molecules will realign to the new forced in shape, once allowed to cool. This is a crap shoot, as it's real easy to add too much heat, which can general distortions and other issues. Next and the most commonly method is fill and refair the areas affected by the distortion. This means lot of putty, weight and elbow killing sanding. The distortion will still be there, it's just covered and refaired to mimic what was once more appropriate for the boat.

    A lot depends on what type of distortion is present. Sometimes you can make "relief" cuts to ease the strains on the distorted areas, knowing you'll have to fill and add reinforcement and replacement fabrics in the process. Strapping her down might work, if left this way for a long time or in a outdoor Arizona setting for a few years. You'll have to monitor this effort and move straps as the hull starts to return to shape and it's slow work. You may be able to strap, brace, etc her back into position then lay some additional laminate on the inside to hold this shape, maybe some ribs to help.

    As a rule, on small, low value boats, the effort isn't worth the time or materials.
     
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