Coronado 15 missing traveler

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by tschlink, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. tschlink
    Joined: Nov 2017
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    tschlink Junior Member

    Hi boat friends, new boat owner (of a used) Coronado 15 here.

    I am open to advice for how to restore my boat's original traveler. The current traveler is a pulley and line bolted to the transom. It is clumsy under way, but also not responsive. There's a lag between letting out the sheet and movement on the boom.

    Any suggestions/pictures/advice are welcome. Thanks in advance.

    If there's already a discussion about this, please let me know. I tried searching around, but didn't see anything specific.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    They made thousands of these puppies and the hardware wasn't the good stuff, so it usually gave up pretty quickly. Finding an origional piece from the 1960's would be difficult. The national association would be a good place to look (>coronado15.org<) for ideas on what they now employ, though I've never seen much more than a bridle used.
     
  3. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I have a C15 I'm slowly getting ready to sail.
    Do you have a picture you are talking about?
    I don't recognize the rig you are talking about in any current pictures.

    Many boats have a simple fixed bridle across the transom, above the tiller.
    It has no pullies.

    Actually I remember a discussion about a "Snipe" type adjustable bridle - this may be what you are talking about. Perhaps you could find something on a Snipe site?
    It appears a boat I have used to have had such a rig, but it was gone before I got the boat.

    A picture would help

    Marc
     
  4. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    Here's how it's organized from the factory. I think it looks cool but it takes up valuable space, also the traveler bar and car are heavy. All the best racers say "stern sheeting is faster;" so they convert to stern sheeting.
    traveler1.jpg

    traveler2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2017
  5. Canracer
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    Canracer Senior Member

    I've been looking around for a good picture of proper stern sheeting, but so far no luck. If you're not happy with how it's performing then maybe the blocks and line need replacing. Or maybe it's not rigged correctly. I'll post a picture if I can find one.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2017
  6. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Here is a picture of the typical stern sheeting.
    A bridle is attached to the edge of the deck, just forward of the transom.
    The sheet is attached to the bridle above the tiller, going to a block on the end of the boom.
    One or two blocks are attached above the sheeting point. I wish the picture was larger.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    These are all great replies. Thanks so much everyone. I’ll snap some pictures and post them this evening.

    I’m in the process of re-installing a freshly sealed splash guard, new halyards, mainsheet lines, shrouds, and forestay.

    In Phoenix we sail while the rest of the country dry docks. If you can call it sailing
     
  8. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    I haven't been able to take any pictures yet, but I drew it out according to what I've been doing and the previous owner showed me.

    After the original post, I can see how wrong this is, but I still can't clearly see exactly how the main sheet should be rigged.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I hope this is clear. The first sketch is same as you were drawing. Works good for lighter wind. The second sketch is for heavier wind, but requires more length of the main sheet.
    upload_2017-11-27_18-39-22.png
    upload_2017-11-27_18-40-3.png
     
  10. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

  11. tschlink
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    tschlink Junior Member

    8F901AA3-A96D-4A97-BABE-920A611556D0.jpeg perfectly clear upchurchmr. Your drawing is consistently what I see scouring the web for information. I found a decent picture in sailing anarchy and have posted it below. Does it look like we are on the same page?
     
  12. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Yes, that is the same as the second "sketch". You see the short white connector rope? If you take it out and the upper pulley its attached to that is the first sketch for lighter air.
    Pity this does not show the bridle, where you had the mainsheet going down to the bridle - that would have taken your head off when you tried to tack.
    You might want to plug the old 1" holes for the old style traveler. And the mounting holes directly above. The backup structure for these screw holes is plywood. If you don't seal them with epoxy, the plywood will start to rot and there is not easy way to fix it.
     
  13. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Great, good luck on getting to sailing.
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That image seems a pretty convoluted way to rig a sheet. Two double blocks or a double and fiddle mounted at the mid boom point, with the tail landing on a cam cleat. The line from the bridle runs up to the turning single at the boom end, down to the boom mounted double, then down to the deck mounted double or fiddle, then final through the swiveling cam cleat. Most fiddles include the option of a swiveling cam cleat so even less pieces to play with. The bridle can be rigged as a traveler:
    [​IMG]
    Now this is end of boom sheeting, but it still works on a mid boom sheet. Also for light air work a simple bungee cord can be rigged to hold the assembly off the tiller.

    There's no sense over thinking this and there are many ways to do it, depending on preferences.
     

  15. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    This is a very light boat.
    No need to over think this with such a complicated setup as shown.
    One benefit of having the mainsheet cleat in the midboom position is that you can keep watching where you are going instead of looking where you were.
    Looks like at least 5 extra blocks in this setup

    Using a "traveler" setup at the rear bridle seems valuable, but it seems to be standard in this class to not.

    This seems to be showing the rig for a masthead boat with the other pulley setup for masthead tension adjustment, not needed for a fractional rig as on this boat.
    Good to see the reminder for Port on the traveler adjustment.
     
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