cork for decks

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Vega, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    I am a little confused about a couple of things perhaps one of you pros could explain.

    1) Benefits of cork are:
    Lighter
    Wear
    Insulation
    Traction
    Stain resistant
    Other I missed ?​

    2) What I have not seen is any limitations or negatives of the material. Now it could be that there are in fact none, but I find this hard to accept. There are negatives to every material and the trick is to understand these limitations and design accordingly. So could one of you give us an idea of the downsides to cork as opposed to teak?

    3) What is the rough price breakdown of Cork. First the material cost, then secondly the installed cost including labor. I have no problem with $150 installed cost, but if that is the price for the materials then it is a bit pricy. Also a rough estimate of the installed price of teak decking in your area would be great since it would allow a comparison with labor costs here.
     
  2. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Willallison Senior Member

    I can't comment on the longevity of cork, other than to say that it no doubt varies from one manufacturer to another, just like any other product, and that it has stood up well in commercial applications.
    The only obvious down side is that when laid it doesn't look the same as a real teak deck. Not necessarily inferior...just different.

    In terms of cost, the wholesale cost for Marinedeck 2000 Exterior runs to about AUD $350 per square metre (9mm thick). Interior is about AUD $110 / m^2. The cost of laying it depends a great deal on the complexity of the job and speed and skill of the installer.
     
  3. Deb Cantrell
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    Deb Cantrell New Member

    Replacing Teak Decks with Cork

    We are in the process of replacing the teak decks on our 1986, 36-foot Nauticat Motor Sailor with cork. We spent considerable time researching the pros and cons of numerous options and concluded that cork was by far the best option for all the advantages noted earlier.

    Someone asked if there were any down sides or disadvantages to cork. There is only one: it is not teak! But we knew this going into the project and are not at all disappointed with the cork. In fact, I'm hard-pressed to know why more people are not using cork as an alternative to teak decks: the installation process is straight forward and the cork is so easy to work with.

    We chose cork from Seacork because it contains a higher concentration of cork and does not turn orange as we observed on a vessel that used a competing brand.

    We are chronicling our project with photographs, and will be writing an article shortly that highlights installation tips and techniques. In the meantime I will happily answer any questions anyone might have about the product and the process. As an aside: our dog chewed a bloody bone on the portion of the deck that is complete and we gasped when we saw the mess. A damp paper towel cleaned it up and not a trace remains. Ditto a mishap with red wine. Our old teak was not at all that forgiving.
     
  4. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: glen cove long island new york

    harhhnt Junior Member

    Seacork

    Amazing
    After all I have written about cork, it is rewarding to see something positive written by someone, other than me about the benefits of this wonderful product.
    Harry Hunt
     
  5. singleprop
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    singleprop Junior Member

    fire rating of cork

    I read somewhere that cork is very difficult to get to burn and that it requires a continuous flame source directly onto it to make it burn. Remove the direct source and the fire goes out.

    Any knowledge about this out there?
     
  6. Deb Cantrell
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    Deb Cantrell New Member

  7. Baxter99
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Saratoga Springs NY

    Baxter99 New Member

    Synthetic boat decking

    Check out this boat decking by Infinty Fabrics: http://www.commercialmatsandrubber.com/c57/c84/Infinity-Fabrics-Marine-RV-Flooring-c80.html

    We sell this product and used the Bamboo Collection on my buddies Pontoon 2 years ago and it still looks like new after sitting in the exposed sunlight 2 summers in a row. We've spilled ketchup, wine, fish guts, etc and just hose it off when done without any stains. Its amazinbg stuff if you want something durable and stylish without spending a ton of cash. We installed it (glue down) with cuits and everything in a day!
     
  8. 4speedfunk
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: on the water

    4speedfunk New Member

    Cork vs. Teak

    Considering all the finger-pointing on this thread...I thought I would post up exactly what I discovered about cork decking over the weekend. I don't own a boat. I don't know anything about cork or teak. I don't want to sell anything to anyone. Here's my story...

    My wife and I are searching for a 40-something cruiser and I went to look at an 80s-era Morgan last Saturday (April 2015). The pics I saw online were really stunning and the boat looked great. Upon seeing it in person...the very first thing I noticed was that the teak decks were not teak at all! They were some sort of cork product...I assume a synthetic composite or something. The panels appeared to be very precise and I assume these were cut to fit using a CAD/CAM type of cutter...they didn't look "hand fitted" to the boat but, rather custom cut so they could be stuck-on with some sort of adhesive. The edges were beveled slightly, and there were caulk lines like real teak has. I assume its a similar product to what some members have described on here, probably made from cardboard templates or something...then sent out to be cut...then returned and installed on the boat.

    They felt amazing...very comfortable and cool on bare feet...much nicer than real teak. They actually looked fantastic as well but, the joints needed a lot of attention. I was told they were installed approx. twelve years ago and unfortunately, the grout lines (joints?) were missing some of the caulking. It appeared that water had got into the joints and in many places the cork was inflamed where the caulk was missing. The caulking looked much like the same stuff you see on real teak...sort of a grey-ish rubbery type substance. Anyway, it looked like a huge undertaking to re-do all the caulking on the cork-decks, and I would question if it wold be worth it to re-caulk or simply replace the cork panels altogether.

    Most of all...it got me wondering what was underneath the cork. Did this boat have soft decks? Were they repaired and capped with the cork? Or were they simply left spongy and covered-up with the cork? Assuming the decking was all good at the time the cork was installed...what is currently happening underneath the cork? It was hard to tell if water was getting underneath the cork panels but, I can say that except for the joints...the cork material itself looked brand new. It was not loose or coming off anywhere (yet) but I suspect if the joints are left un-addressed, water will eventually get underneath the cork and cause problems.

    Long story short...if the stuff is able to be repaired, I would be interested in knowing how to do it. No question I would choose it over real teak. Too bad this owner did not put more effort into maintaining the caulking, I can only imagine how nice it looked when it was brand new. I did not buy the boat but, even with the caulking issues...the cork decking impressed me enough to search the internet for info on it...which led to this forum...which led to me registering to boatdesign.net, just to share my experience. FWIW...I never got the impression HH was trying to pitch a product. Thanks for the input...its spot-on.
     
  9. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    Hi this is HH and yes I have been doing cork decks, When I am on line I am not selling anything but what I am always trying to do is help my fellow boaters. Unfortunately too many people are miss trusting and their own worst enemies.

    Its ten years later and finally people are waiking up to what I have known for ten Years. I just wrote a large post cork decks and I cant find. it but it expresses very exactly how I still feel about teak cork and synthetics

    It is to my amazement how the general boating community is still in the dark ages about decking. I read the blogs and when I hear such things as I used Bamboo, I want a wood that doesn't get as hot as teak when there is a world of knowldege out there waiting to be passed on, if one would only listen and learn

    If anyone would like to know what I know, it is now 20 years I have been working with product and I would be glad to help anyone with what I know.
    there is a motive one of achieving fulfillment for me.passing on my knowledge.

    Harry Hunt 516-637 7967 EST My cell Phone.
     
  10. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    OCTOBER 20 2015
    Just want to up date this it still remains an offer if anyone would like to discuss cork decks, decking, altenative decking ete

    Contact me Harry Hunt harhhnt@aol.com

    www.marine-solutions.com
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Can cork be installed over steel or aluminum decks?
     
  12. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: glen cove long island new york

    harhhnt Junior Member

    cork over steel or aluminum decks

    Hi
    Yes cork can be applied over almost any surface. It is glued down using a polyurethane material, such as 5200 by 3m. Depending upon the surface you would like to adhere too. I would suggest you check with your supplier as to which adhesive material would be best. There are also thickened epoxy
    deck adhesives that would work very well in some cases.
    Covering an Aluminum dock or float would make a very welcome addition,
    adding beauty and practicality. Footing would be enhanced, and it would be much cooler under foot. One benefit I have never mentioned, is when the kids take a header there would be no abrasion, cuts, or marks as it is very cushioning against a fall. Dries from water faster than anything you have ever used, cork does not get wet as it is cellular and does not absorb liquids
    of any type.
    Harry Hunt
     
  13. harhhnt
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    UPDATE 10-2015

    Its been 20 years now that I have been working with this product and still no complaints, by the way that's longer than a teak deck will last.

    Harry Hunt
     
  14. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    cork

    Well its 10 years later, still no problems many satisfied customers and many more teak decks that have worn out to be replaced by cork.
    Just thought I would go back in time and respond to some of the older posts.

    Harry Hunt
     

  15. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    cork

    Thanks for the endorsement you are right on about me. I do sell Sea Cork and Marine Deck, and have now 20 years of experience with these products.
    I can tell you I have never had a problem with these products. In the amount of time I have been working with these two products, new teak decks have come and gone. My work has stood the test of time. Cork is truly a remarkable product. As far as that boat you mentioned. Without seeing it I can be confident when I say that the material will out last the boat. I met a contractor in New York City when I was at the Boat Show and he came into my booth. He looked at the cork and said to me,"I know everything about this stuff, you want to know what's wrong with it?" I said yes, and he said, "It lasts too long! We demolish buildings in the city here and the cork floors are still like new 100 years later!" He said it all!
    Harry
     
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