cork for decks

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Vega, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. A Fn Noob
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Westminster,SC

    A Fn Noob Tinkerer

  2. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: glen cove long island new york

    harhhnt Junior Member

    Very Nice!

    My size is 10, can I get a pair? Harry
     
  3. A Fn Noob
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Westminster,SC

    A Fn Noob Tinkerer

    Haha.

    Ive been looking into this cork thing lately. I really want an alternative to carpet for a bassboat project Ive been working on. I think that cork would be ideal for the bassboat market. I want to try it anyway, so I've been reading a little bit about cork, how it is harvested, processed, and so on. I also saw a website recently where the Chinese are getting into the cork harvesting/processing business. I think its good for the environment all around, too. They harvest the cork from cork-oak trees every 9 years, and take the best material for the wine-cork market. The rest is ground up and made into sheets, blocks, etc.

    I think that the waterproof cork products like that shoe are using silicone to bind the cork particles together, but Im not sure. (Anyone want to call Tiva and find out?)

    The bass-boat carpet market is huge. They are replacing carpets every few years. Cork decking would provide added cushioning and soundproofing. I guess the key is to find the right balance of flexibility & durability. And of course cost.

    Im not in the boat business, just a tinkerer.
     
  4. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    How can I be of assistance? I import a product called Seacork. You can go to the website www.seacork.com. We are the distributors for this product in the US. I like your thinking, why not get into the business? We can supply sheets of this material or finished panels made from a patterns supplied by the consumer or mfgr. If you wish you can contact me harhhnt@aol.com
    or my website www.marine-solutions.com Harry Hunt
     
  5. A Fn Noob
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    A Fn Noob Tinkerer

    Yes, send me some samples!
     
  6. joshuadwright
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    joshuadwright New Member

    I'm in the cork biz. www.coolcorc.com There is more cork today than there ever has been. Cork trees are harvested by peeling the bark, not cutting the tree down. The bark grows back. Very sustainable. The wine industry is getting away from it b/c a screw cap is about 10x cheaper than a good cork bottle stopper. It is very good in compression (gaskets). I'm thinking of using a cork deck on my next boat. I want a boat with a little insulation. Why are boats built without insulation??? It would help even if you didn't have A/C.
     
  7. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    In what way is this product superior to a teak deck besides supposedly lasting longer? It is not much cheaper!
     
  8. Raggi_Thor
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    Lighter?
     
  9. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: glen cove long island new york

    harhhnt Junior Member

    Cork Decking

    Cork decking is by far the superior alternative decking material. The application of a cork deck brings to your vessel the benefits of little to no maintenance, below deck insulation, (lowering temperatures below deck) a thirty year life expectancy, (teak only bing 12 years) the best adhesion under foot, 45 degrees before slippage even when wet, and cushioning under foot, and it is even comfortable to sit on, no cushions needed!
    I have written much about this subject and I find it incredible that the banter continues when there is so much imparicle knowledge about this product, yet the nay sayrs continue to be blinded by their own ignorance to learn.
    This product is available in a multitude of thickness 4mm-6mm-8mm-9mm-12mm and 17mm. It looks fantastic on the interior sole as well, but there it should be coated to permit ease of cleaning. More on this if anyone is interested. With the wide selection of thicknesses, all applications can be addressed.
    You want light weight? go thin, you want extreme insulation, go thick etc, etc, The bottom line with this product is is the benefits it brings to a vessel,
    It cannot be stained, easily repaired if damaged, 30 year longevity, based upon the 9mm product, and all the other self evident attributes, ecologically being the least of it! The Marine industry has already taken care of teak, they dont use it anymore!
    By the way, the cork stopper thing! It is not indangered and should be used for wine bottles, the synthetics are not necessery, and not to use cork will put a lot of industries (people) out of work! Just another example of the blind leading the blind. Its a wonder anything new ever gets changed for the better.
    there is a report about this go to www.panda.org/mediterranean and
    Other website sources
    www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_sales.htm
    http://www.agirpourlenvironnement.org/presse/23plastok4.htm
    http://www.cniid.org/healthcare/docs/resume_KEMI.pdf
    http://www.pro-environnement.com/articles/legislation-relative-aux-dioxines-en-milieu-detravail,
    6ftq6jn279gy7.html
    http://www.cniid.org
    http://www.amis-nature.org/sets/setpubliplaq.html
    www.realcork.pt
    www.celiege.org

    HOPE THIS OPENS SOME MINDS!
     
  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    <<<<<HOPE THIS OPENS SOME MINDS!<<<<<

    It would I guess, if not half of the links were outdated and the other half in french.
     
  11. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    harhhnt Junior Member

    If anyone would like a copy of the report I mentioned, please e mail me at
    harhhnt@aol and I will send the report directly to you. Harry Hunt
     
  12. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Location: Duluth, Minnesota

    Steve W Senior Member

    Harry,what type of adhesive do you lay the cork planks in,some kind of contact adhesive? i assume the resistance the plank offers when laying a sprung deck is a lot less than springing around a teak plank around. I have laid many a teak deck in my boatbuilding career and have found that two things limit the useful life to under 20yrs and neither of them has anything to do with the material,just the builder and the owner. A teak deck should easily last 30yrs as long as it a/ is laid with square edges (without a rabbeted edge) using temporary spacers,b/it is temporarily held down through the seams while the glue sets so there are no plugs or screws c/ full depth caulking seams with a bond breaker in the bottom so the caulk only adheres to the planks and not the subdeck d/ and this is a biggie,no over exuberant owners who maintain it to death.A 3/8 inch thick teak deck laid this way will last as long as a 3/4 inch deck laid with rabbeted edges and permenant screws and plugs.That said i really like the cork alternative and would love to try it. I have read this thread through and appreciate your input but what is missing is any real life input from an actual owner of a boat with cork decks with some years behind it. btw,i wear Birkenstock sandles with cork soles and love them and they hold up well but eventually break down.
    Steve.
     
  13. harhhnt
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: glen cove long island new york

    harhhnt Junior Member

    Hi Steve

    We use Saba, Seal One, Fast or slow depending upon the temperature.
    If I can be of any assistance please contact me @ harhhnt@aol.com
    I would also like to suggest you search blogs by harhhnt. There you will be able to read much about this product and it may be informative. By the way, I have been doing this for almost 10 years.
     
  14. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    What is "imparicle knowledge" and how can a salesman's view be regarded as objective? Teak is teak. This stuff on a deck looks like one tried to save money - even if it lasts long and grips well... To each their own tho, as I have an actual board to go cut. Good luck with your presentation!
     

  15. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    I'll give you a non-salesman's opinion, if you want one.
    Teak is light, grippy, easy to work, quick to lay, comfortable under foot and durable.
    After a great deal of research, I had Marinedeck 2000 installed on Graphite ( http://imaginocean.net/index1.html ) both inside and out. I chose it over Seacork as it is compressed to a higher density and so should wear better. I considered every option available and the cork won hands down.
    I would have liked to try Esthec ( http://www.bolidt.nl/esthec/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=19&Itemid=132 ) but in the end it was too heavy and too expensive, which is a pitty as they make it in a fab looking grey that would have complimented Graphite's contemporary look really nicely.
     
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