Corinthian Trimaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by waterbird, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. waterbird
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    Location: Australia

    waterbird New Member

    Hi, does anyone out there now anything about corinthian Trimarans?
    Like windward ability, Resin used and so on.
    Would be grateful for any comments.
     
  2. Norswerks
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Aurora, In.

    Norswerks New Member

    Don't know if you still want an answer to this one or not (just found this website), but I used to work for them back in Tarpon Springs, Florida, helped build the last two Tri's before they went to cat' workboats and barges and sold out (sometime around the late '80's).
    The Tri's were really great boats, sweet sailers and strong as hell. I always hoped I'd have the chance to build one for myself. They were designed as ketch rigged, constructed with polyester resin and end-cut balsa core:

    Gel coat
    mat
    omni directional
    uni long.
    uni trans.
    mat
    balsa core
    mat
    uni long.
    uni trans.
    rovin

    It's been a while so I'm not 100% sure, but I THINK that was the pattern. The exact resin formula was constantly changing: The best available at that time was the one used.

    I know there were a few owners put various forms of retractable keels, sideboards or skegs on their boats, depending on what they had in mind for use and abuse, even had a retractable centerboard on one. Keep in mind that every one of these boats was a custom built craft tailored to the buyer, so each was a bit different.

    Hope that's of some use (and not too terribly late). Like I said, it's been a while but I'd be happy to dredge up any other dusty old memories that might be of interest.


    >Hi, does anyone out there now anything about corinthian Trimarans?
    >Like windward ability, Resin used and so on.
    >Would be grateful for any comments.
     
  3. Norswerks
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Aurora, In.

    Norswerks New Member

    Don't know if you still want an answer to this one or not (just found this website), but I used to work for them back in Tarpon Springs, Florida, helped build the last two Tri's before they went to cat' workboats and barges and sold out (sometime around the late '80's).
    The Tri's were really great boats, sweet sailers and strong as hell. I always hoped I'd have the chance to build one for myself. They were designed as ketch rigged, constructed with polyester resin and end-cut balsa core:

    Gel coat
    mat
    omni directional
    uni long.
    uni trans.
    mat
    balsa core
    mat
    uni long.
    uni trans.
    rovin

    It's been a while so I'm not 100% sure, but I THINK that was the pattern. The exact resin formula was constantly changing: The best available at that time was the one used.

    I know there were a few owners put various forms of retractable keels, sideboards or skegs on their boats, depending on what they had in mind for use and abuse, even had a retractable centerboard on one. Keep in mind that every one of these boats was a custom built craft tailored to the buyer, so each was a bit different.

    Hope that's of some use (and not too terribly late). Like I said, it's been a while but I'd be happy to dredge up any other dusty old memories that might be of interest.


    >Hi, does anyone out there now anything about corinthian Trimarans?
    >Like windward ability, Resin used and so on.
    >Would be grateful for any comments.
     
  4. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Welcome to the forums Norswerks.

    I'd say you've been around multihulls since near the beginning. These were quite an old design, and I believe Bill Simons had something to do with them way back when?

    It appears as though you double posted your message. If you click on the 'edit' box of your last posting you can delete one of them if you care to.

    Also if you wish to 'quote' either the whole message or a portion of a previous meesage, just click on the 'quote' button. Alternatively you can place any sentence or word in between these [ QUOTE ] ..... [ /QUOTE ] , but don't put spaces between brackets and letters of QUOTE.

    If I were looking at one of these old Corinthians I'd give a good look at that balsa core. I would suspect it is waterlogged. I'd also give a good look at interbonding lines as polyester resin is bad about bonding to anything including itself.
     
  5. Norswerks
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Aurora, In.

    Norswerks New Member

    Thanks for the welcome.
    Can't say as I'm, quite all that ancient. Even the Corinthian 41' was aging when I was there.

    I caught the double posting (think I may have got a key bounce) but it wouldn't let me delete it. Still trying to figure it out. I can build a computer from scratch (fiberglass waferboard and silkscreen) but I still have trouble using the misbegotten things.

    Always check for core seepage but we were always careful to make ABSOLUTLY sure we had through-and-through saturation of the poly (from the BACK-SIDE, not slopped on top). If we didn't get flow through EVERY segment, we pulled it out and replaced it before continuing. The balsa would be completely encapsulated: no air, no bubbles, no moisture. We were very, very picky about that. Mostly because we hated redoing it a whole lot more than we hated doing it right the first time. Every layer would be completed, begining to end, in one go so it would be uniform throughout which also helped prevent de-lamination and some bonding issues.
    I think a lot of the problems most manufacturers had with not bonding had to do with roll out, surface contamination and/or mix ratio, individually and in combinations. Not to say that we never had de-lam, cause we did, everyone does, but we always found a reason for it and once fixed it stayed fixed. Of course, any work done after it left the yard could be the start of any number of problems but I'd have happily taken one of our hulls around the world without hesitation.
     
  6. darlenegisele
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Bow NH

    darlenegisele New Member

    yes call Bill 207-712-6178
     
  7. DaSailor
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    Location: SW Florida

    DaSailor New Member

    Hello all,

    I have purchased an old, 1968, Corinthian Trimaran and am looking for any kind of documentation, clubs, options on these old vessels. As she is over 40 years I am sure that many changes have made to her in the past, I intend to restore her and sail towards the sunset. I have sold my 1969 Charlie Morgan 38 and an into a very different boat. If you can shed a bit of light on this Tri I would appreciate it. One of my first tasks is to find a small generator and possibly water maker, and all the other stuff. If you know of any Corinthian Trimaran owners groups I would enjoy emailing them also.

    In any cans thank you for your help.
    David
    DASAILOR @ Gmail.com
     
  8. lonabishop
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL

    lonabishop New Member

    Corinthian Trimarans

    I would like to talk to you more about Corinthian Trimarans. lonabishop@hotmail.com
     
  9. Pat Ross
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 53
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    Location: Florida

    Pat Ross Corinthian 41 Tri #12

    The Corinthian 41 was built from 1965 till 1983. I think 27 total were built. The original building company was called Gulf States Research and Development Corporation. In time it became Corinthian Yachts, Inc. This company sold out to the Corinthian Yachts, Inc that currently builds power cats. Here is a link with some ship building history Gulf States R. & D. Corp. http://shipbuildinghistory.com/history/shipyards/5small/inactive/gulfstates.htm

    Originally Symmons Sailing, Inc out of New York, was importing Telstars 26's tris and Iroquois 30 cats from England back in the 60's. This was the only way to get a fiberglass production multihull in the US at the time. Piver, Cross, Brown,Wharram, etc... were selling their plans and there was amateur, build your own multihull boom going on in the U.S.

    "Symmons Sailing" figured there was a need for a larger multihull and they decided to commission a design to be produced here in the U.S. There is some discussion about who did what with this boat. But if you look at her carefully and look at Piver designs you see a great deal of similarity.

    The story goes that C. William Lapworth of Cal Yachts, Inc started the design and at some point Ted Irwin became involved with designing the interior and the sailing rig, originally it had a Sloop setup. She was changed to the Ketch rig she carries now. During the time that Irwin was involved, Morgan consulted with Irwin on the design. It is my understanding that Piver was working for Morgan at the time. It is logical that if this is true Piver talked with Morgan.

    Later I am told that Piver became very unhappy about the Corinthian design. I can imagine why, it looks like his boat. But what is definitely not his and I think a real plus for the design are the asymmetrical amas. I think they will help the boat point higher.

    Irwin was a hands on designer I am told. I believe he wanted close supervision on the builds. Living in Florida, he oversaw the boats built in Tarpon Springs, where Corinthian Yachts, Inc now resides, and the original shop did. To my knowledge this is the only multihull he was associated with. At some point Symmons Sailing discontinued association with the design but she continued on.

    Eventually through at least two companies before being called Corinthian Yachts, Inc, the Corinthian 41 became the first fiberglass production multihull built in the U.S.

    The company was owned by Carl Vossberg.

    I hope this help with some of the information you were looking for.

    Pat Ross
     
  10. lonabishop
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL

    lonabishop New Member

    Norswerks

    I worked with a boat fiberglas builder and he said the most important manufacturing procedure was to complete each layer as soon as possible and no later than 12 hours to assure chemical bonding of each layer to the next. When something happened that the resin had hard dried he was forced to rough the surface to get a less reliable mechanical bond. Did Corinthiam have such a processs?
     
  11. Sand crab
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Montana

    Sand crab Junior Member

  12. lonabishop
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL

    lonabishop New Member

    and i went to see it today. Finish is sub-par, has some issues but pretty solid. Very practical but not "yacht quality." Definetly not worth market for an average Corintian 40.
     

  13. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 476
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Sounds like he was talking about epoxy. Also that only applies if your laying up more than one layer. Corinthians would almost certainly have been polyester not epoxy, and given they were built to a high standard I'd say the layups were fine.

    The post above mentions balsa. If balsa is breached it can be a real nightmare to put right. I wonder if they were solid below the waterline ?

    lonabishop: What would you reckon it is worth ? Is the sub par just below or are there rig issues ? Just curious, wrong country and hemiphere to buy it :)
     
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