Cooking aboard or outdoors

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    Looks good to me, too.
     
  2. jamesgyore
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Melbourne

    jamesgyore Senior Member

    Thanks for the compliments.

    I does not occur to most that a 12V immersion blender is next to useless (even if you can find a better quality non-communist Chinese one), and a clamp type potato ricer does not work so well either. An old school hand cranked mouli would be great except the S/S ones have not been manufactured in years since they are now made in communist China too.

    I'd have to prise my mothers circa 1970's S/S mouli from her dead hands. The woman has every cutting face attachment and it is in mint condition. They don't make them like they used to, pitty really.

    I've worked all day on preparing the perfect potato wedge. twice cooked before being put aboard for an evening sail around the bay. I intend to torture some friends on another boat by having them ready to serve as we return to the boat ramp.

    I'm not crazy enough to deep fry aboard, so I've put a lot of effort into making the perfect oven/BBQ finished wedges.

    Pic, some time in the am.
     
  3. MoeJoe
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    Location: Stockholm, Sweden

    MoeJoe Junior Member

    I need to shape up my cooking aboard. Altough this was actually quite nice, after a day of sailing, a quick swim, and enjoying the nice scenery in a sheltered inlet..

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Grey Ghost
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Location: california

    Grey Ghost Senior Member

    Scientifically proven - burgers taste much better there :)
     
  5. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    You should put your burgers under the engine cowling, it keeps them warm.

    Which is what this thread started as and not a recipe discussion for restaurants.

    What boat carries fresh bazil and cinamon---Geezus.

    A mans boat has spam in it and a tin of beans and a line an hook.
     
  6. jamesgyore
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Melbourne

    jamesgyore Senior Member

    Reviewing the many great contributions made to the thread, I'd say quite a few.

    Speaking of which, I don't recall you making a contribution to cooking aboard or outdoors.

    Do enjoy your spam.
     
  7. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    any recipe for spam turkey surprise? :)
     
  8. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I seem to remember giving my recipes that you poo pooed as disgusting so I havnt suggested anything else.

    Your recipes are for full blown kitchens without any thought of pre prepared food for night watches or bad weather that could be days.

    Please explain how you do soup at an angle of 45degrees in a storm.

    Thats when the spam should have been opened.

    What about a batchelors stew --do you know that one --its what I lived off when I was young. Thats not the shop type.

    Pre prepaired hot stew and crackers is very welcome in the cold rain as the rain wont hurt it. Stew will last days if it boiled daily and even topped up with a carrot or two with minimal effort, and at the end of the week through some curry init.
     
  9. jamesgyore
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Melbourne

    jamesgyore Senior Member

    I'm glad you asked.

    Every dish I've presented here has been prepared aboard a trailer sailor with a gimballed single non-presurised alcohol cook top and a transom mounted BBQ.

    In the southern hemisphere we have only just entered spring, indicating that most of the dishes have been prepared during a winter season of sailing. Port Philip, for those that know it is a considerable expanse of rather challenging water during our winter.

    That, some of you will recall, was the whole point of the last few months. What could I and what could I not successfully cook on a small boat with limited resources.

    The gimballed cook top (Origo 1500), has worked a treat, yes even soups and stews at a heel. The BBQ on the other hand, has proven more difficult, with quite a few sausages and mini roasts rolling off into the wake of the boat when the hood was lifted. Depressing, but very true. But then again, the BBQ is not of a marine design, just a convenient and cheap product.

    Admittedly, before repairing the gimbals, the cooktop was prone to snap back into its locked position resulting in quite a few meals ending up on the floor. I recall mentioning the 10 second rule in an early post.

    Two skillets, a pressure cooker, a baking tray and a Bessemer stock pot with lid is all I have aboard along with a cooks butane torch and a 60Lt portable cooler which needs to be chilled at home and then wheeled to the boat.

    Few resources and poor weather are no excuse for poor provisioning, poor menu plans or poor eating.

    By far the biggest problem I've had with cooking aboard has been setting up the butchers paper and plate on the cabin top to get the pic to share with you all.

    Others and I have more than proven that fine dining can be had aboard and outdoors. Oh... Perhaps with the exception of the cremated chicken incident.

    Again, do enjoy your spam.
     
  10. jamesgyore
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Melbourne

    jamesgyore Senior Member

    You're kidding right? I think you've lived in a third world toilet too long.

    HACCP might have been invented by the Yankee's for the benefit of the space race, but it is equally fitting on a boat full of people you are responsible for.
     
  11. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I'lle explain with more detail. How do you do soup at 45 degrees while you most urgently need is to vomit. Carrots in tomato soup would be suspicious.

    When you say boat do you mean QE 11 or the smaller parrafin stove type 40 footer that most have here.

    Pre prepaired food is imperative, or its cold beans and crackers and when your hungry that is heaven. Thats Aussie beans with a ring pull can opening,--- a sailors delight.

    And Tuna fish with masaman curry,----with crackers. All edible with boom and tackle threatening your head as the rain runs off your nose. Not a place for houmos and Greek salad. A bit of sea time might change your mind/ menu.
     
  12. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Well thank you very much, your ignorance of the East is equaled by your ability to understand cooking at sea.

    No you would not like it here they have girls.
     
  13. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    Hello all- I salute all who have the good sense to get out of doors and off on your boats for a bit of chow.
    The closest I've done is dine out at a old time Island resort where a local favorite was served up.

    Fish cakes:

    Nellie Myrtle Pridgen’s Fish Cakes
    April 30, 2009 by islandcookbook

    2 or 3 medium blues

    2 or 3 medium potatoes

    1 stick butter, melted

    1 medium onion

    lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce and mustard

    Poach the fish until it flakes. Use the poaching water to boil the potatoes and onions. Deskin and debone the fish. Mash potatoes and onions, and add to the fish with lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, mustard and melted butter. Make into patties or cakes. Put butter and yellow mustard on top before frying.


    Simple tasty fair.
     
  14. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    Can't argue with that; sounds good.

    A country cousin is the 'carp balls' we used to deep-fry when I was a kid, to get around the plenitude of bones they're endowed with. Poaching in water with a little white vinegar softened and dissolved some of the smaller bones, and made it easy to flake the meat off the rest with a spoon. We mixed the meat with mashed potatoes and onion; added salt, pepper, lemon juice and a little butter; rolled everything up into balls about the size of golf balls; then deep-fried them like hush puppies. Sometimes we grated or minced the boiled potatoes, to give a better texture. And sometimes we breaded the balls before frying them.

    Our carp mostly came from water with muddy bottoms, like the drain ditches that covered (and still cover) the valley to keep it from reverting back to marshland. And yes, that affects the flavor. Our cure was to toss the carp into a 55-gallon drum, with a garden hose suspended above to provide a trickle of oxygenated water, feed them corn meal for a week or two, then hang them by their tails and slit their throats -- basically bleeding them out like a pig.

    It got rid of the muddy flavor, and seemed to firm up the flesh too. And yes, I was softhearted or squeamish, depending on your viewpoint; I always tapped the carp with a leaded head knocker before taking a knife to them.

    Strangely enough, a lot of folks we knew wouldn't touch carp; they said it was 'n***** food.' Another reminder that the 'good old days' weren't all that perfect....
     

  15. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    we eat mullet in florida. discard the red band of meat and only eat the white meat, eliminates any mud flavor. I love smoked mullet. Almost as much as a good cigar! :)
     
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