Converting Outboard to Inboard?

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by RosesToAshes, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. RosesToAshes
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    RosesToAshes Junior Member

    is that possible? if so how much trouble would it be? Ive been looking for a houseboat and found one for cheap but it has a outboard motor and we really want one with an inboard (car motor preferably) How much cost & time would it be to convert it?

    Thanks
    Adrienne
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A lot of questions can be answered by knowing what make, model and year boat you are thinking about modifying. The bottom of the boat will have some determining factors as will it's general construction type and interior accommodations arrangement. As a rule, you'll probably spend much more converting it, then just buying a new (or used) outboard and hanging it where the other one lives. Even if you found a car engine for free, you still need to make engine beds, engine enclosure, install tankage, plumbing, electrical, hang a shaft, strut or two, a prop, stuffing box, transmission and a rudder with it's related gear, etc., etc., etc. Are you sure you want to do this, compared to just plopping a different outboard on the transom?
     
  3. RosesToAshes
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    RosesToAshes Junior Member

    :eek: oh wow that is ALOT of work!! here is a link to the boat we were looking at http://www.boattrader.com/listing/1981-RIVERSIDE-16x56-Houseboat-95305489 says nothing really about the engine, (other than the tiny picture) but it is so cheap I had to find out more about converting. I guess I should stick with looking for inboard houseboats :p

    Thank you so much for explaining and helping me :)
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Why don't you like outboards. They are much easier to work on.
     
  5. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    And you've got to like directable thrust, no rudder to install or maintain, no stuffing box, no cramped engine room, "tilt-up" protection on bottom strikes, etc., etc.

    -Tom
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The only thing an engine on that beast is used for, is to move it from slip 46B to slip 37A. You aren't expecting to travel around in it are you?
     
  7. RosesToAshes
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    RosesToAshes Junior Member

    LOL thats why I wanted an inboard!!!
     
  8. RosesToAshes
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    RosesToAshes Junior Member

    we've had "normal" boats with inboard and outboard motors, Ive just personally always preferred inboards. quieter for one. and My husband knows his way around inboards better
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You don't get it, that houseboat is designed to remain parked at a slip, not putter around, regardless of engine type. It's a floating Winnebago and shouldn't be confused with a powerboat in any fashion. It's intended to be treated as such and left parked in a berth for 99.9% of it's life.
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The cheapest solution, in my opinion, is to buy a tender with a good size outboard. Use it to tow the houseboat and to play around with.
     
  11. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Perhaps we should first determine: Is this a floathome or a houseboat?

    Floathomes should be towed on sunny, windless days in the middle of summer only for reasons of relocation.

    Houseboats have navigation lights, are fair-weather sailers, can do 5-knots or better and are (to some degree) seaworthy.

    -Tom
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Lets say you've had fun puttering around with that old gal on the local river, the current has become contrary and 4 knots and the wind is picking up in front of a low pressure area moving through, say 15 knots and it's time to go "up hill". So, what kind of tender did you have in mind?
     
  13. RosesToAshes
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    RosesToAshes Junior Member

    That's not a bad Idea really.. never thought of that.
     
  14. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    RosesToAshes,

    Sorry for your loss.

    Is this a floathome or a houseboat we're talking about?

    If you never thought about towing it then it's probably not a good idea as this requires a certain amount of skill gained from experience you likley don't have given your response.

    -Tom
     

  15. RosesToAshes
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    RosesToAshes Junior Member

    Float home? thats like a trailer on a floating platform right? no we want something mobile. a houseboat We "plan" on getting some lakefront property and "beach park it" when we aren't floating around. No I never expected a houseboat to be a speed boat or anything, but to just cruise around the lake would be nice.
     
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