Converting Inboard to Outboard

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by funkyblues76, Feb 21, 2007.

  1. funkyblues76
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Archdale, North Carolina

    funkyblues76 Junior Member

    I have a 19ft fiberglass v-hull boat with no motor. It was set up with inboard motor, but all I have left of that is the "thing" in the transform that hooked the original inboard to the outboard with the hydraulics.
    Question:
    Can I convert to an outboard motor and use a bracket to attach?
    How to replace "thing" in transform with patch/plug?

    The boat still has steering column that moves - should I keep all this stuff?
    or gut it and the wires?

    Thanks for any help. This is my first boat project and looking for some answers, suggestions or solutions. Thanks for your patience.

    FreddyB
     
  2. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    Freddy,

    1. Yes, you can convert from an inboard/outboard to an outboard. Assuming someone with survey and/or hull repair experience has inspected your transom and it is sound (very important) there are aftermarket setback brackets which will bolt to your transom without modification. Here are 2 articles describing the concept advantages and disadvantages, and showing a sample installation.
    http://continuouswave.com/whaler/reference/engineBrackets.html

    http://continuouswave.com/whaler/reference/standardTransomBracket.html

    2. This article shows a good method for glassing in a strong plug to fill the I/O transom opening.

    http://www.capndsboatshed.com/filliohole.htm

    The first article on brackets for outboard mounting discusses steering. If the old steering was hydraulic, it may be possible to use some of the system.

    Naturally, ask yourself if the work and cost is worth it vs selling what you have and buying a used boat with what you want. If you decide to go ahead, be prepared for both massive frustration and occasional moments of pure joy.

    Good luck,

    Charlie
     
  3. funkyblues76
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Archdale, North Carolina

    funkyblues76 Junior Member

    outboard on inboard

    That is a lot of great information. Didn't imagine how much was involved, but it seems like a beautiful process. Am I going the correct route looking to convert to outboard power and patching the current hole in transom? OR have an inboard installed that was close with previous engine? Any idea
    cost comparison and time getting it water ready. Pondering the idea of selling the boat since I got at a steal of $130 w/trailor. Doing alot of research now.
    Thanks for your input...
     

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  4. funkyblues76
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Archdale, North Carolina

    funkyblues76 Junior Member

    What are the possiblities that I can mount a jack plate intead of a bracket?
     
  5. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    More info on this subject, of course, on the other thread on this subject. I don't see any reason why you couldn't use a jack plate instead of a large setback bracket. They are each intended to give some improvement in outboard motor performance vs. just bolting it to the transom for a fixed position mount. I'm not qualified to tell you whether an outboard or a replacement inboard would be better. Part of the answer is your personal definition of "better". Most discussions of similar projects seem to agree that there are performance benefits observed from reducing the boat's weight by 200-300 lbs.
     
  6. funkyblues76
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Archdale, North Carolina

    funkyblues76 Junior Member

    What HP do I need to push my 19ft fiberglass runabout. It will be used primarily for fishing in local lakes in NC. I know much of it is preference, I don't want to buy a motor that won't match my hull size. I don't want too big of a motor because of supporting it with a patched transom. Thanks for the help!
     
  7. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    Quick answer: look at used boat ads on line and off line, see what 19' outboards are. Avoid the highest and lowest HP ratings, focus on the average. I did a quick search and found quite a few in the 90-115 hp range. Makes some sense, I doubt you'd get good performance out of much less power, on the other hand you don't want to overstress your modified transom. More important is extensive reinforcing of your transom plug, to spread the stress over as much of the transom as possible, and, through your braces, carry some of the stress back to the stringers, which were designed to take most of the weight and propulsive force.
     

  8. funkyblues76
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Archdale, North Carolina

    funkyblues76 Junior Member

    What is the best way to support the windshield while I replace the floor and wood on console bottoms suporting the fiberglass hull that holds the windshields. Do I need to just take them off? Will the hull overhang be stable while I'm removing and installing floor.

    Thanks!
     
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